Questions tagged [infinitive-constructions]

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16
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5answers
3k views

Is there such a thing as a future infinitive in English?

I am currently working on the English idiomatic phrase "Someone is said (to do/to be doing/to have done) something," and, try as I might, I cannot find any worthwhile piece of information ...
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0answers
28 views

A Specific Case of Infinitive as Adjective

To see him, you would have supposed he had been doing this for years. Having first thought that to see him was an adverb, I then noticed it wasn’t exactly doing the work of an adverb and might just as ...
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2answers
59 views

You can have 'it is important to do X'; can you have 'it is urgent to do X'?

I'm proofreading an academic text, and I came across 'It is urgent to develop new theories for...' Intuitively this use of 'urgent' seems non-standard to me, and while I've resolved (or I suppose ...
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3answers
53 views

Active perfect infinitive

I was happy to have finished everything early I was watching a video on active and passive infinitive and this example was in the video. I don't understand why the present perfect is used "to ...
2
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1answer
61 views

Should this verb be in the third-person singular form, the infinitive form, or the present participle form? [duplicate]

Watching a game review, I've noticed a phrase whose meaning confused me. The reason why I got confused is that the author used a base form of the verb "to explore" in pair with the singular ...
0
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0answers
15 views

infinitival relative clause

I'd like to know whether an infinitival relative clause such as "with which to V" needs an expicitly identified antecedent for the semantic subject of "to V." If not, could you ...
1
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1answer
66 views

omission of semantic subject

Toni Morrison began writing when she was in college, but she did not produce anything good enough to publish for many years. Her troubled marriage, divorce, and life as a single mother made it even ...
2
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0answers
64 views

Re: Subject + verb (“intended”) + infinitive phrase. Could the phrase function as an adverb (vs. direct object)?

First, to save time and effort, I do understand simple explanations such as this (owl.purdue.edu): We intended to leave early. The infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of the verb ...
0
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0answers
77 views

Is the verb have in the infinitive “to have breakfast” an auxiliary verb?

Is the verb "have" in the infinitive above an auxiliary smilar to the auxiliary verb "have" used to form the perfect tense?
0
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1answer
80 views

Is there any 'for + NP + to-infinitive' where the NP is not the semantic subject of the infinitive?

In (a), for example, you is the semantic subject of apologize: a. I've been waiting for you to apologize. Is there any for + NP + to-infinitive where the NP is not the semantic subject of the ...
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0answers
24 views

when should “to” be preposition or be part of infinitive? [duplicate]

When "to" is a preposition: I look forward to receiving your letter. When "to" is part of the infinitive: I expect you to come over. My question is, how could I know whether "to" is a preposition or ...
2
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1answer
55 views

Matrix clause or infinitival clause?

What is the function of “the doctor” in the following sentences? Is it a constituent of the matrix clause or of the infinitival clause? I wanted the doctor to examine my daughter. I persuaded the ...
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0answers
45 views

Is 'to' a part of infinitive when using 'to + verb' and 'to' has the same meaning as 'in order to'

Please, take a look at the examples below. I started to cry. I opened my eyes to see them. ('to' = 'in order to') In the first example the 'to cry' part is sure an infinitive. It corresponds to ...
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2answers
155 views

“Love to see this happen?” or 'Love to see this happens?" What's the grammar rule behind this? [closed]

It confuses me sometimes. It looks likes the former is far more common. But what's the logic behind that?
0
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1answer
42 views

To use a clause, an infinitive or a participle?

What's the difference between the three expressions, and how to correctly use each of them? He is the only one who meets our criteria. He is the only one to meet our criteria. He is the only one ...
0
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0answers
36 views

require for sombody to do something Vs. require somebody to do something [duplicate]

Is it correct to say 'That required for someone to stay with him all the time'? I want to know if this sentence is grammartically right or wrong.
0
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1answer
60 views

It is not + noun + to infinitive

I do know an adjective (without a noun) in this construction can be followed by a to-infinitive, as in: It is not acceptable to kill a goat in that way. It is not good to kill him here. But, is it ...
1
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1answer
129 views

What is the subject in a passive infinitive sentence saying “to be considered for a promotion”

Once the employees have completed the company's largest project successfully, they will be offered an opportunity to be considered for a promotion. I found that sentence in my English book and ...
2
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2answers
595 views

Usage of infinitive or gerund

For him to sail back is unthinkable For him sailing back is unthinkable. Why is the second sentence considered as wrong? Can the first sentence be paraphrased as (1) It is unthinkable that he could ...
2
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2answers
291 views

“To hunt is my favorite pastime.” What part of speech is “to hunt” in this sentence?

The function of infinitives seems to be up for grabs at the last post I commented at. I either need to be schooled or my interlocutors do. May your answers bring some clarity. These are your choices....
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0answers
87 views

What is the trail of logic in the sentence

Consider the sentence You don't need to patronize me. To patronize is an infinitive. But I can't understand why use of me is right. Is it the object of the infinitive or of the need verb? Can an ...
1
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1answer
488 views

Changing the passive infinitive into the active voice

This problem has been bothering me for almost a week. I was hoping for that lightbulb moment but it's still dark in the attic, so here I am. In the English coursebook, MyGrammarLab Advanced C1/C2, ...
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2answers
56 views

Is the sentence “We see this problem be unsolvable.” grammatically correct? [closed]

This is supposed to be the correct answer to one of the exercises from a B2 textbook written by a non-native author. It struck me as odd, but my teacher (also a non-native speaker) told me that such ...
2
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2answers
159 views

Grammatical term for a noun coming after an infinitive?

I didn't come to offer help. As far as I can tell, this is how I would analyze this sentence from a grammatical perspective. I = pronoun didn't = aux. verb with "not" for negation. come = zero ...
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1answer
870 views

Which one is true: try to not repeat it or try not to repeat it? [closed]

Which one is true: try to not repeat it or try not to repeat it? English is my favorite lesson😁😁😁
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4answers
1k views

Question marks in titles, in particular those beginning 'How to …'

I found the following blog title without a question mark from The Hindu site: How to ease Afghanistan’s progress in cricket Is it grammatical, if we don't put question mark in questions of titles? ...
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0answers
271 views

Bare infinitive with exceptions

Reading the sentence: "We were still talking about what we should do when we heard the children shouting". in the above sentence, why don't we write "heard the children shout", as the verb 'hear' ...
8
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2answers
684 views

Pseudo-cleft sentences with the verbs of perception

I know we must use bare infinitives with these verbs in the Active. e.g. I saw a lady cross the street. There are other verbs with which we are supposed to use a bare infinitive in the Active. e.g. ...
0
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1answer
106 views

Answers about please, please

I'm pretty sure that an infinitive can be split with "please" in stated requests, maybe for emphasis. For example, "I'm asking you to please study harder"; "I implore you to please shut up". A ...
1
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1answer
151 views

(The goal of) his visit is to spend time

A Washington Times news article starts as follows: The White House said residents of the Oregon town where a gunman killed nine people at a community college have “nothing to fear” from President ...
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3answers
167 views

How to explain “contributions that the private sector can make to enhancing…”? Is the “to” a preposition here?

Recognizing and encouraging the contribution that the private sector can make to enhancing cultural diversity and facilitating,... My question specifically is about "make to". Why is to followed ...
4
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3answers
202 views

That lawn will be a bear to maintain. - what types of construction is this?

That lawn will be a bear to maintain. I am interested in the infinitival clause at the end there and how it relates grammatically to the rest of the sentence. Is is a complement or a modifier? Also ...
-1
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2answers
182 views

Is “make me to go” grammatical? [closed]

Is this sentence grammatically correct? You can’t make me to go with you. Is the word to required there or not, and why?
9
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4answers
20k views

When should I use “to do” and “to doing”

folks Here are two sentences that I find difficult to understand the grammar during my reading. Last year, two of her ministers suggested that convicted tycoons be pardoned if they could contribute ...
0
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2answers
797 views

absence makes the heart grow fonder [closed]

Why does the idiom: absence makes the heart grow fonder have the form of grow and not grows?
1
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1answer
313 views

Bare infinitive after “can see”/ “can hear” [duplicate]

After can see/hear, can the bare infinitive be used? e.g., I could see John get on the bus. We can say "I could see John getting on the bus," but is it possible to say "I could see John get ...
0
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3answers
922 views

What kinds of verbal complement does the verb “request” accept and require? [duplicate]

This verb has me a bit confused. I cannot submit my report personally and therefore have to resort to sending it by post. Now I need a polite way to ask to do this. I request that I send my report ...