Questions tagged [adverbials]

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1answer
36 views

A woman with two children came. Is “with two children” an attribute or an adverbial modifier?

I'm not sure what the phrase “with two children” is doing here. Is it describing "a woman" or "came" or this make sense both way.
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2answers
69 views

How to parse “this is so they can…”

Ligaments connect bones to each other. This is so they can help stabilize the joints and provide structure to the skeletal frame. source Parsing one: "So they can help..." is predicative. Parsing ...
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43 views

Is this tutorial using “to [verb]-ing” the right way? When should I just use “to [verb]”? [duplicate]

That tutorial says Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) is an approach to analyzing datasets to summarize their main characteristics. It is used to understand data, get some context regarding it, ...
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49 views

“in that way” - Which of the following three sentences is more correct to convey the desired meaning?

I'm not asking for a proof reading. And to further clarify, the Context is there to only provide context. I ask you to please ignore any perceived mistakes in the Context (located underneath the ...
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17 views

the + superlative adverbs

The rule I once wrote in my documents from the internet: The article is omitted when comparison is between different levels of performance/execution by the same person or thing: He runs ...
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2answers
102 views

What are AWAY and APART modifying here?

I wanted to ask a question about the adverbs away and apart. The villages are miles apart. The exam is only two weeks away. It is three days apart. It is five kilometers away/apart. Away and apart ...
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1answer
42 views

a relative pronoun/adverb as an adverbial

He collects some cars that are antique. I know the relative pronoun “that” is the subject of “are” here. This is the letter (that) my mother sent me. I know the relative pronoun “that” is the ...
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1answer
90 views

Since and for, where can they be omitted?

I’m well aware of the difference between ‘since’ and ‘for’. However I have a question. Imagine I say ‘I’ve been working on the essay since Saturday’ or ‘I’ve been working on the essay for two days’. ...
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0answers
29 views

Is the phrase 'Going forward' an adverbial phrase? Are there any particular contexts in which it can or cannot be used?

I recently was asked this question by one of my colleagues, if this was an adverb or an adjective. While I figure it cannot be an adjective, I presumed it is an adverbial phrase. Would I be right to ...
2
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1answer
248 views

What's happening in this sentence using “far away”?

"David and Emma live far away in the mountains." What grammatical role do the words "far" and "away" have in that sentence? I realize that "far away" must be an adverbial, that can be both a ...
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2answers
116 views

Putting adverbs such as “on Wednesday” in the beginning and at the end of sentences

What's the difference between the following two sentences: On Wednesday I went shopping I went shopping on Wednesday
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2answers
110 views

Adverbs of location after be verb

We're upstairs. In this sentence, is upstairs a noun or an adverb? I think it's the latter because if it was a noun, the sentence is missing a preposition before upstairs. To my knowledge, in a SVC ...
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1answer
1k views

How to use “same” as an adverb?

I have the following sentence: An uncommitted player reacts to different alliance types the same. I may as well say “...in the same way” but want to keep it short if possible. Is this a correct ...
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2answers
227 views

adverbial phrase inversion

I am teaching English at a high school in South Korea. I am not an American but Korean. Recently, I was teaching adverbial phrase inversion as a grammatical point. My question is which of these ...
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2answers
1k views

What part of speech is “rather than” in the sentence, “Consider swimming rather than hiking.” [closed]

What part of speech is rather than in the sentence Consider swimming rather than hiking. Is it an adverbial phrase, or is than a comparative conjunction and rather an adverb?
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3answers
349 views

Can a noun be an adverb? [duplicate]

This question, which I first posed on the ELL site a few weeks ago, remains effectively unanswered. Although there an answer did finally get posted, it seemed to be more of a parody of an answer than ...
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2answers
61 views

When and why can you omit “when” (or other conjunctions or prepositions) before a gerund clause that’s used adverbially?

I had a bad experience working there. Is that sentence correct, or must I write: I had a bad experience when working there. I had a bad experience while working there. or even: ...
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0answers
19 views

Indefinite article forming an adverbial or adjectival phrase

Consider the sentence "She's a little crazy", taken from Disney's Aladdin. The copula verb has been attached to an adjective (the other common thing it combines with is an object), in this case the ...
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4answers
316 views

“Inside her” or “inside of her” [closed]

Lit a fire "inside her" or "inside of her" Which is correct in this case? Is "inside" a preposition here? I read the similar questions to mine, in particular this one - “Inside of a house” versus “...
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1answer
195 views

Where is it best to put the “when” of a sentence?

John yesterday went to the store to buy eggs. John went to the store yesterday to buy eggs. John went to the store to buy eggs yesterday.
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1answer
183 views

Adverbial modifier with the insertion of comma

I was studying about participles and one site a guy asked the following question: How would the meaning of the following sentences differ from each other? 1. The beach, located on the far side of ...
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43 views

Clause analysis of “He was red in the face”

I'm wondering if anyone could tell me how to analyse a clause such as "He was red in the face" – what is "in his face" here? Is it an adverbial, or a complement of "red"? Thank you!
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1answer
102 views

What is the function of “for more productivity” on this sentence?

rapid population increases drive the search for more productivity. What is the function of "for more productivity"? is it a complement or an adverbial? Thank you!
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0answers
67 views

Second “To Be” with Irrealis/Past Subjunctive

Assuming that I'm a person who uses irrealis subjunctive, and every part of the example situation is hypothetical, which of the following is more correct? Option 1: If I were ever in a store where I ...
4
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2answers
230 views

Why does “An Advanced English Syntax” say the infinitive in these sentences is adverbial?

In sentences like the following the Infinitive is probably Adverbial, and therefore the italicized part will be put in the Adjunct column. You seem to be ill. He is known to be reliable. ...
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0answers
74 views

Several dependent clauses connected with “or”

my problem sentence is the following: After completion, or due to termination, the car picks up the crew members and flies them back to the moon. I would like to make those commas as I put them ...
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1answer
108 views

Misplaced modifier?

I was wondering whether an adverbial prepositional phrase can come after the object without it modifying the verb/object in the sentence. For example, The storm pelted hail with great ...
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1answer
406 views

Is this an adverbial complement? “They led me _to believe that there was no danger_.”

I'm a novice who realised the existence of this site today. The following picture is from Idiomatic and Syntactic English Dictionary by A.S. Hornby: Pattern 10 Verbs marked P 10 may be ...
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1answer
834 views

continue [through] to

I'm wondering what contribution the word "through" makes to the following sentence: The trend continued [through] to April. How does the above differ from the following? The trend continued to ...
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1answer
38 views

Does putting a how before an independent clause make it dependent?

I'm wondering if putting a "how" before an independent clause somehow makes it dependent. Example: John questioned societal norms, and how those norms affected the students. or Example: John ...
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2answers
1k views

Preposition of manner

What is the way to place these sentences below? Are they fine or are there some rules? "Mayra is very happy in her life with Harry." "Mayra is very happy with Harry in her life."
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1answer
146 views

Confusion between two clauses

Could this clause be interpreted in both Adverbial clause and noun clause? Maria will tell you when David gets home - In this one, Maria says that she will tell someone when David gets home. ...
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0answers
69 views

May an adverbial qualifier suffice to free the word “free” of its ambiguity?

Free is an ambiguous word. For the purpose of this question I'll skip any meaning the word may bear as a verb, and I'll also overlook the "free from/of" variant. In fact, I'll just focus on the two ...
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1answer
88 views

Wrong use of adverbial (prepositional) phrase?

While other members of the judiciary regularly attract the ire of victims and their families for a lenient approach to what can seem the most brutal and callous of crimes... The above clause ...
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2answers
257 views

Is there an adverb meaning “by volunteering”?

I am looking for an idiomatic expression (something similar to "by choice" or by "one's volition") that would mean 'by volunteering.' Sentence: Meeting in cafes (or sometimes in private ...
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3answers
222 views

Usage of at in a question

I have recently read the following quote from a famous vegan activist: How would you feel if the moment you were born someone else had already planned the day of your execution? However, I think ...
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299 views

Comma usage: Sentence starting with “But”, sentential adverb, and followed by “when”

I have a sentence structured as follows in a scientific text. But, in particular, when doing A, the system cannot do B. I think all commas are formally required. However, for "But" in particular, ...
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2answers
817 views

Can a noun function as an adverbial?

As we know, some noun phrases can function as adverbials (especially temporal noun phrases). Here is an example taken from Wikipedia: James answered this morning. Can a single noun function as an ...
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1answer
963 views

Adverbial clauses or Gerunds! Which one is this?

In my King James Bible, I have found some words which look like Gerunds but they really are not, or at least they don't make sense when they get turned into nouns. Take a look at these examples: ...
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1answer
32 views

Some Sentence and Comma [closed]

Whatever the degree of integration, teaching autistic children effectively will require more funding, to train both specialist and mainstream teachers. Why do we need comma after "funding" and ...
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3answers
119 views

Can we reduce this adverb clause? “In winter, the Magdalen Islands are almost as isolated as when they were first discovered by Cartier.”

Can we change it to "...as when first discovered by Cartier"? Is " when they were first discovered by Cartier" an adverb clause? Or does the adverb clause start with "as isolated as..."? Is either ...
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2answers
449 views

What is and isn't a constituent, and how (whether?) can one argue that something is or isn't grammatical

Background In CGEL on p. 1317, we find the following analysis of the sentence [1] [Beauty] [as well as love] is redemptive. They note that the singular is signifies that as well as is here not a ...
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2answers
21k views

“has long been” or “has been for a long time”

As far as I know, '(for) a long time' is preffered to 'long' in affirmative sentences unless 'long' is matched up with too, enough, as, so, before, after, and etc. I read the following sentence on ...
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2answers
7k views

Commas with multiple prepositional (adverbial) phrases at the end of the sentence on the ground of restrictive/non-restrictive modifier

Do we put commas between 2 or more prepositional phrases that immediately follow each other at the end of the main clause if all of them modify/restrict the main predicate differently (e.g. one ...
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1answer
160 views

How is the distinction made between adverbs and nouns in adverbs which are representative of the thing of whose adverbial quality they also represent?

Adverbs of place, among other adverbs of the nature mentioned in the question, confuse me. Saying that "wherever" is an adverb when "wherever" functions both as the representation of the place and ...
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2answers
163 views

Does this sentence exemplify an adverbial clause?

On the Wikipedia page for 'Dependent clause,' on the subject of 'Dependent words,' there is provided an example which supposedly presents an adverbial clause, viz., "Wherever she goes, she leaves an ...
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1answer
95 views

Is putting “for a moment” between subject and verb grammatical?

I'm not a native speaker of English. When I was reading The Da Vinci Code, I encountered the following sentence. He for a moment looked as if he'd seen a ghost. I heard that a sentence can be ...
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1answer
129 views

Starting a sentence with “and”-connected adverbs or adverbials

I want compare one thing with two other things, discussing their differences as follows. Balls are better than dice, since they provide better rollability. Moreover and in contrast to eggs, balls ...
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1answer
178 views

past progressive with dependent clause — dependent clause types in the face of ambiguity

I'm trying to explain how to contrast the following two sentences in a meaningful - detailed - way. I was eating when a bee stung me. I was eating when I was on a break. The intention is to ...
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3answers
766 views

adverb phrases modifying each other

Here comes a very stupid question. I always wondered what type of grammatical phenomenon allows adverb phrases to be placed right next to each other repeatedly. So something like this. I ate a bag ...