Questions tagged [adverbials]

An adverbial is any syntactic constituent able to take the place of an adverb, including adverbial phrases and adverbial clauses. These can serve as complements or as modifiers.

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What is the reason for skipping the preposition “on”? [duplicate]

In Goggle Ngram Viewer I found these sentences: How are you enabled to say it was Monday that you saw him? It was Monday that I was sworn as a witness. It was on Monday that he called at my house. ...
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Adverbial adjectives [duplicate]

Continuing from this question about a cloze reading test, in the construction If a conversation starts angry, it will almost certainly continue angry. or the song lyrics Start angry... end mad... ...
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Double fronted adverbials with the same meaning

For me, double fronted adverbials make sense and sound fine when they have different meanings or tones, for example: Slowly, without enthusiasm, he picked up the board and... But in some texts I've ...
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Sentence adverbs and the user's attitude

According to Disjunct_(linguistics) [S]entence adverbs convey the mood, attitude or sentiments of the speaker. Yet, Sentence adverbs form a completely standard aspect of English grammar, but there ...
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When can we reduce “while clause” as in “don't eat lying down” and “don't talk facing the fan”?

It seems like native speakers say "don't eat lying down" and "don't talk facing the fan" when they mean "don't eat while lying down" and "don't talk while facing the ...
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“Statues carved in a row”

Overseas ESL students were asked to transform a sentence into passive voice. One gave an unexpected answer, and their teacher consulted with me. Original: The people of Rapa Nui carved huge statues ...
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Difference between “besides”, “apart from” and “except for”. Prepositions vs adverbials

I am studying discourse markers and ended up checking online (in crownacademyenglish) about the difference between these expressions. Firstly, this website affirms that they are prepositions, which I ...
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Are adverbial modifiers in decline?

Words such as rather and quite are characteristically used in English to modify meaning, According to Paul Baker in Lancaster University: complex and understated forms of speech are in decline. ...
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Is “by…” an adverbial phrase?

Adverbial phrases are known to answer questions related to how, when or where something was done. Is this considered as an adverbial phrase? By pressing the button, she opened the door and left the ...
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Should a two-word noun that modifies be hyphenated?

I came across the sentence "He is Fibonacci spiral attractive," and my first thought was that "Fibonacci spiral" should be hyphenated. I consulted my sister, and she thought it ...
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Was it common in Shakespeare's time for adverbial phrases and objects to precede the verb in spoken English?

I'm trying to come up with a list of differences between Shakespeare's manner of writing and modern English, and one of the big differences I've noticed is that Shakespeare often seems to put ...
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Does “So as long as” mean the same as “Just as long as” in this sentence?

I have a question regarding a sentence in this Meta post: Votes reversed by the detection script can be re-cast by the user at a later time, so long as the user does not again engage in serial voting ...
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Why is “for six years” not the adverbial complement in this sentence?

Identify the adverbial complement in the following sentence: I have been living in Ireland for six years. a) I haveb) been livingc) in Ireland (correct answer)d) for six years (your answer) Why is &...
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Dropping “when” in an adverbial clause renders this sentence ungrammatical?

Please consider these sentences side by side: When walking in a dark alley, you should be cautious. When walking in a dark alley, be cautious. Walking in a dark alley, be cautious. Walking in a dark ...
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Is “for sure” an adverbial phrase? [closed]

"Of course" is regarded as an adverbial phrase, even though the components of it appear to be a preposition and a noun. So what about the phrase "for sure" (when used to mean for ...
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Participle Phrases as Adverbs

I'm teaching my daughter some grammar lessons and ended up a bit confused about how to analyze participle phrases such as "removing his coat" in the following sentence: Removing his coat, ...
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Can 'where' introduce a specific manner without an antecedent?

I came across this sentence when reading Eclipse, where Sam (werewolf) was the leader of the pack: “ Sam approached Carlisle where he stood in the front, the huge pack right on his tail.” I've known ...
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“When” and “Where” when we talk about hypothetical situations

When you need something between a comma and period, use a semicolon. Where you need something between a comma and period, use a semicolon. From a logical point of view, both sentences are correct, ...
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Using “between” to introduce a set of traits or circumstances

I was wondering if this construction using "between" to introduce a set of traits/circumstances was correct. (I'm also interested in alternative phrases that may be more appropriate): ...
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“International themed” or “internationally themed”?

Would you say “an international themed party” or “an internationally themed party”?
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Gerund after as though, please, help to clarify

They looked at Mary in surprise as though... her story. A) not believing B) not having believed C) not believed D) believed
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Which verb does the adverbial phrase “for many days” modify in this sentence: “People remember most of what they have studied for many days.”

Context: This is a comprehension check question for a text which basically says that people are quick to forget information unless they study/review it several times. We have to answer whether the ...
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Origin and usage of “day of”

There is an expression I have heard used many times in conversational U.S. English but cannot recall ever seeing in writing: day of as an adverb, omitting the object of the preposition. Examples: &...
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Should I Use a Comma or a Semicolon at the End of a Series of Complex Introductory Phrases or Dependent Clauses?

In my writing, I begin several sentences with a series of two or three -- or more -- adverbial (or prepositional) phrases (or dependent clauses), some of which contain commas. Seeking clarity, in ...
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Complement of the object?

I'm reading Verbs of Incomplete Prediction in my grammar. It says that certain Transitive verbs take, beside an object, a complement to complete their predication. I have understood almost everything ...
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How interchangeable are the adjectives in the comparative “the closer/nearer, the …”?

In an allusion to Dave Starr’s magnificent¹ cover art, I had the opportunity to use its title idiomatically, and said: “The closer the bone, the sweeter the meat.” … and was promptly corrected: “...
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reduced causal adverbial clauses in the second part of a sentence

I should acknowledge that I asked this question in learner's site but I haven't got any helpful response; furthermore, I hold that this is a complex grammatical matter, so that is why I'm repeating ...
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They grew up in the Sudan; hence their interest in Nubian art

thefreedictionary.com: They grew up in the Sudan; hence their interest in Nubian art. Am I right that?: "Hence" is an adverb. "Hence" is the head of the adverbial phrase "Hence their interest in ...
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How to determine what part of the sentence a gerund phrase is modifying?

Most of us fall between the two extremes of Psalm 22 and the anti-psalm of the man facing Nazi oppression. Welch, Edward T.. Side by Side (p. 39). Crossway. Kindle Edition. Take this sentence ...
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Have you been influenced all you can ever be influenced? [How are the preceding and the following clauses connected?]

How would you rephrase 'all you can ever be influenced'? (In) all (that) or (in) all (where)? To me this 'all' seems like a relative adverb but no old school grammar book has 'all' explained as a ...
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Can the word “that” be substituted for in which?

Have you filled out the details in the paper that the date wasn't mentioned. Is this a correct sentence? Here I used "that" because I read in a grammar book "that" is sometimes used as an adverbial ...
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What does “summer and winter” mean?

I’d like to ask about the sentence from Lion’s Mane by Conan Doyle. Summer and winter he went for his swim, and, as I am a swimmer myself, I have often joined him. This “he” is Mr. McPherson, ...
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Adverb as a modifier

We have a sentence given below: I'll see you sometime in the afternoon. In the above sentence, 'sometime' is an adverb, modifying the PP: 'in the afternoon.' The adverb 'sometime' can be expanded ...
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A woman with two children came. Is “with two children” an attribute or an adverbial modifier?

I'm not sure what the phrase “with two children” is doing here. Is it describing "a woman" or "came" or this make sense both way.
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How to parse “this is so they can…”

Ligaments connect bones to each other. This is so they can help stabilize the joints and provide structure to the skeletal frame. source Parsing one: "So they can help..." is predicative. Parsing ...
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Is this tutorial using “to [verb]-ing” the right way? When should I just use “to [verb]”? [duplicate]

That tutorial says Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) is an approach to analyzing datasets to summarize their main characteristics. It is used to understand data, get some context regarding it, ...
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“in that way” - Which of the following three sentences is more correct to convey the desired meaning?

I'm not asking for a proof reading. And to further clarify, the Context is there to only provide context. I ask you to please ignore any perceived mistakes in the Context (located underneath the ...
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What are AWAY and APART modifying here?

I wanted to ask a question about the adverbs away and apart. The villages are miles apart. The exam is only two weeks away. It is three days apart. It is five kilometers away/apart. Away and apart ...
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a relative pronoun/adverb as an adverbial

He collects some cars that are antique. I know the relative pronoun “that” is the subject of “are” here. This is the letter (that) my mother sent me. I know the relative pronoun “that” is the ...
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Since and for, where can they be omitted?

I’m well aware of the difference between ‘since’ and ‘for’. However I have a question. Imagine I say ‘I’ve been working on the essay since Saturday’ or ‘I’ve been working on the essay for two days’. ...
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Is the phrase 'Going forward' an adverbial phrase? Are there any particular contexts in which it can or cannot be used?

I recently was asked this question by one of my colleagues, if this was an adverb or an adjective. While I figure it cannot be an adjective, I presumed it is an adverbial phrase. Would I be right to ...
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What's happening in this sentence using “far away”?

"David and Emma live far away in the mountains." What grammatical role do the words "far" and "away" have in that sentence? I realize that "far away" must be an adverbial, that can be both a ...
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Putting adverbs such as “on Wednesday” in the beginning and at the end of sentences

What's the difference between the following two sentences: On Wednesday I went shopping I went shopping on Wednesday
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Adverbs of location after be verb

We're upstairs. In this sentence, is upstairs a noun or an adverb? I think it's the latter because if it was a noun, the sentence is missing a preposition before upstairs. To my knowledge, in a SVC ...
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How to use “same” as an adverb?

I have the following sentence: An uncommitted player reacts to different alliance types the same. I may as well say “...in the same way” but want to keep it short if possible. Is this a correct ...
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adverbial phrase inversion

I am teaching English at a high school in South Korea. I am not an American but Korean. Recently, I was teaching adverbial phrase inversion as a grammatical point. My question is which of these ...
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What part of speech is “rather than” in the sentence, “Consider swimming rather than hiking.” [closed]

What part of speech is rather than in the sentence Consider swimming rather than hiking. Is it an adverbial phrase, or is than a comparative conjunction and rather an adverb?
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Can a noun be an adverb? [duplicate]

This question, which I first posed on the ELL site a few weeks ago, remains effectively unanswered. Although there an answer did finally get posted, it seemed to be more of a parody of an answer than ...
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When and why can you omit “when” (or other conjunctions or prepositions) before a gerund clause that’s used adverbially?

I had a bad experience working there. Is that sentence correct, or must I write: I had a bad experience when working there. I had a bad experience while working there. or even: ...
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Indefinite article forming an adverbial or adjectival phrase

Consider the sentence "She's a little crazy", taken from Disney's Aladdin. The copula verb has been attached to an adjective (the other common thing it combines with is an object), in this case the ...