Linked Questions

1
vote
3answers
513 views

gerund or participle [duplicate]

Literature is inevitably a distorting--not a neutral--medium. Writers interpose their vision between the reader and reality. In the above sentence, is the word distorting a gerund or a participle ? ...
1
vote
2answers
66 views

What part of speech is “baking” in “baking is fun”? [duplicate]

In the sentence "baking is fun," what part of speech is "baking"?
17
votes
12answers
5k views

How many parts of speech can a word be at the same time?

ᴛʟᴅʀ: Is it ever possible for a sentence to have a word in it that is simultaneously more than one single part of speech in that sentence under the same parse and meaning? (For example, a few ...
15
votes
6answers
5k views

Using “so” and “very” for ungradable adjectives

We generally use modifiers such as "so" and "very" for gradable/normal adjectives (water can be quite/so/very HOT, but not quite/so/very BOILING (an ungradable/extreme adjective). Yet would you say ...
15
votes
4answers
7k views

How productive is the verb prefix “un-”?

Is it possible to use un- with new words such as sit, sleep, sad? I'm currently seeing many words (in programming) which use un- in the meaning of undoing something. For example, is it possible to ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

Is “Let's get started” passive voice or not?

Is the idiomatic expression 'get started' (as in "Let's get started") a passive construction? Or is 'started' here an adjective? EDIT As John Lawler has suggested in his answer, let's not get ...
6
votes
1answer
13k views

Should I modify a gerund using an adjective or an adverb?

I know that a gerund is a noun, so it should be modified by an adjective. However, it is also a verb form. Can I modify it by using an adverb?
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Adjectives that do not have predicative position

I've read somewhere that some adjectives cannot be used in the predicative position; for example "this is a major problem" is acceptable, but "the problem is major" is not acceptable. I'm wondering ...
5
votes
2answers
586 views

Should “gerund + objective” be modified by adjectives or adverbs?

I read from TheFreeDictionary http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Gerunds.htm the examples "Studying too hastily will result in a poor grade." and "Working from home allows me to spend more time with my ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Difference between gerund and present participle [duplicate]

What is the difference between a gerund and present participle? When should we use a gerund and when should we use a present participle ?
1
vote
1answer
361 views

Polysemous prefix 'un-'

The prefix 'un-' is polysemous. Its meaning depends on the word class of the root/stem it is being attached to: for verbs the meaning has a "reversible" effect and for adjectives it has a "negated" or ...
2
votes
1answer
168 views

Verb, Adjective, noun?

A case refers to a "binding" or authoritative decision made by the court. Binding is a verb, noun or an adjective?
2
votes
1answer
146 views

Is “rumored” a verb or an adjective (a participle adjective)?

According to a dictionary, rumor can function as a noun or a verb. I can see rumor being a noun, but am having difficulty accepting it as a verb. The dictionary gives the example sentence, John is ...
2
votes
1answer
105 views

For the linguists among us: I like loud singing vs I like singing loudly

Can you explain why using "loud" as either an adjective or an adverb changes the meaning of the sentence. Is it just an English convention, or is there something deeper going on? I like loud singing =...