Questions tagged [negation]

Negation is the process that turns an affirmative statement (e.g. "I am American") into its opposite denial (e.g. "I am not American").

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62 views

Is “only” a negative adverb?

The site 'thefreedictionary.com' includes the word 'only' in the group of negative adverbs with hardly, scarcely, barely, seldom, etc. and specially categorizes it as an adverb creating 'conditional ...
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Sophie ate all her strawberries and so didn't Amelia [migrated]

New England speakers often use a negative form such as so didn't where others would use the positive, as in Sophie ate all her strawberries and so didn't Amelia -American Heritage Dictionary What ...
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Agreement negation [migrated]

"I don't agree totally with all you said" Does that mean - I agree for the most part with some disagreement?
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Placement of “anymore” with respect to other complements, as in “not possible anymore to …”

I often see sentences like this from non-native speakers: ?It is not possible anymore to cross the border without a passport. To me, this sounds wrong, and I would write this instead: It is no ...
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Some with negatives

Some with negatives. I don't want some guy coming in here and asking me questions. I don't want any guy coming in here and asking me questions. Number 1, I know I have this before. Number 2 sounds ...
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She can't sing AND/ OR dance

She can't sing or dance. She can't sing and dance. I saw both sentences; I guess that they are whole negation and partial negation respectively. However, I am not sure which of the action verbs is ...
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154 views

In what conditions should the negative of a “ that-clause” move to the main clause?

I don't think they can win. I know they can't win. In the " that-clause", why does the first example use the affirmative, yet the second one use the negative? I guess the verb "can&...
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Can the words “right” and “wrong” be considered to be grammatical affirmatives and negatives? [closed]

Can the words "right" and "wrong" be considered to be grammatical affirmatives and negatives? Consider the sentence "I am not wrong." This can be simplified to "I am ...
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Noun clause in negative form

My question is about noun clause in the negative form. So here is the sentence: But what you can do is don't give up. Can I use the negative form (don't) in the second part of the sentence? And if so, ...
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Can I use 'out of this world' negatively in a sentence

Can I say " their stupidity is out of this world. Its kinda amusing" ? And what are the other ways to say it
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Sentences beginning with “I do not think (that)” vs. “I think (that) + negation”

Among the following sentences (assuming they are all grammatically correct, and hopefully seem natural to native speakers as well): I do not think the overwhelming majority of the countries in the ...
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About the remote “not”

Not a native English speaker. I noticed for a long time now some speakers use a second sentence consisting of a single word, "not", as a way to entirely negate the former sentence and ...
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“would we not” vs. “wouldn't we” in questions

Is there a difference between the following two sentences? Is the second sentence grammatically wrong? Why would we not expect the body to revolt? Why wouldn't we expect the body to revolt? Is it ...
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As -1+1=0 in mathematics, so it does in English? [closed]

For example, there are two following statements together: 'A doesn't play soccer.' (-1) and 'A plays soccer' (1). To sum it up (0), are saying two statements (-1+1=0) same with saying no statements (0)...
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Is “Not that we would have expected anything else, of course” sound?

In the GSMArena article Xiaomi denies any ties to the Chinese military in response to being blacklisted by the US, "would have" is used: Today Xiaomi has issued the following statement on ...
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I don't know how to understand this sentence ' it seems inconceivable that at least one of these planets does not have a life form on it'

the full context is like this: However,when we look at the 100 billion stars in our galaxy(the Milky Way),and 100 billion galaxies in the observable Universe,it seems inconceivable that at least one ...
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What should I respond when someone ends their sentence with ',no?' [duplicate]

How should I respond when someone ends their sentence with ', no?'. I can see this going two ways: No yes: yes to the no. no: no to the no. Example: Q: your day was good, no? A: No, it was good ...
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“I did not go out because it was raining”—how could one disambiguate this sentence? [closed]

"I did not go out because it was raining" is ambiguous, with at least two interpretations. It could simply mean I did not go out because it was raining (and, therefore, a bad time to head ...
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1answer
143 views

Sentences with two verbs with the second verb negative [duplicate]

I have a problem with these sentences. They have two verbs and the second verb is negative. Where should not go? try to not waste food try not to waste food and try to not take it personally try ...
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What does this answer to a negative question mean?

A: So, no party tonight? B: No, there is a lot of discussion. Is B saying there is no party?
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Can I show my opinion in negative interrogative?

I believe It is not safe to let strangers in. How do I ask people and find out if they have the same opinion as me? Is it safe to let strangers in?: It feels like to me that I have no opinion. Isn't ...
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How to say the interrogative form with a base form of a verb ..in English? [duplicate]

In French language, I will say "Comment ne pas être repéré". But I want to translate it into English. Do we say "How to not be spotted" or "How not to be spotted"?
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Meaning of “lack of impunity”

This passage comes from the book Civil–Military Relationships in Developing Countries by Dhirendra K. Vajpeyi: Finally, this chapter will also look at the ensuing problems Indonesian democracy faces ...
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Opposite of disappointed

The opposite of like is dislike. The opposite of assemble is disassemble. So here, “dis” is a prefix that acts as a negation. Why is the opposite of “I’m disappointed in you” not “I’m appointed in you”...
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What is it about this statement?

This phrase "came to me" when I awoke from a dream (there's a reason why, based on the dream, but it's not relevant): Not catching a ball is not a crime. A rather simple sentence, and easy ...
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Help conjugating

A funny guy on twitter made this post: "waaah society doesnt make sense" As opposed to what? foraging? "euhheuuhuh we are not hard wired for city life" a neighboring chieftain just ...
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Term for this type of negation: “Not for X I don't”

You got any more pot? Not for $9 an hour I don't. What is this type of negation called? These are the lines from a movie script. I've come across this sentence structure quite a few times but I know ...
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Is it grammatically right? [duplicate]

If I don't love him because he is tall, is he tall or not, according to context?
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Preposition change like “depend on” -> “independent of”

I'd like to know if, in English, there are more cases when the preposition changes for the negation (or eventually with some other change of gramatical context), the same or similar to "on" -...
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When do I answer negative questions (e.g. “Aren't you…?”) with “yes” or “no”? [duplicate]

I want to know how to answer negative questions. For example, take the following example: Q: "Aren't you supposed to be there at 7? You don't have time." A: "No, I can make it on time.&...
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The meaning of Let us not or Do not let us

As far as I know, the negatives of Let us are Let us not and Do not let us. And Let us has two different meaning: one is a suggestion and the other is an imperative. Then doesn't Let us not or Do not ...
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“neither… nor”

Is this sentence correct? You will not be allowed to do neither the non-graded nor the graded assignment of week one unless you complete this activity.
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Is there a term for an past-tense adjective that implies transformation (e.g., “melted ice”)?

Recently, someone objected to my use of the terms "melted ice" and "condensed steam," saying that those materials are no longer ice and steam, respectively. I agreed and said that ...
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Inversion is not used after “not far/long”

Page 271 of Practical English Usage reads Inversion is not used after "not far/long" so we say Not far from here you can see foxes, or Not long after that she got married Why don't these ...
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“Not to watch” vs “Not to have watched” as subject of a sentence [duplicate]

E.g. 1 Not to watch Kobe Bryant's matches when he was alive is my biggest regret. £.g. 2 Not to have watched Kobe Bryant's matches when he was alive is my biggest regret. Am I right that e.g. 1 is not ...
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I will call somebody else, not neither him nor you

I have a sentence I will call neither you nor him I guess it means I won't call neither you nor him Out of it it's not clear whether I will call anyone at all but I want to say that I will call but ...
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784 views

When is it more correct to say 'did not' and when 'didn't'?

I noticed multiple times, when writing in Microsoft Word that the program suggests a correction, from either form to the other. I can't seem to follow the logic. When is it better to say did not, ...
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Punctuating lists containing negative elements

I came across some sentences similar to these: I would like my burger with no mustard, jalapeños, lettuce, and pickles. I would like my burger with mustard, no jalapeños, lettuce, and pickles. I can'...
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Can't have drunk VS Isn't able to have drunk VS Wasn't able to have drunk

I found a good sentence: She can't have drunk that much coffee It seems to be correct. Why isn't the next thing correct then if "can" and "be able" can mean the same thing? She isn't able to have ...
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“these functions are strictly non-decreasing, whereas the others ARE”, or “these functions are strictly non-decreasing, whereas the others DO”?

Should I say "these functions are strictly non-decreasing, whereas the others ARE.", - or - "these functions are strictly non-decreasing, whereas the others DO." ? Related, but not similar: ...
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How to interpret the use of adverbs with conjugate clauses?

I wanted to clarify how an adverb (usually preceding) affects the clauses connected by a conjunction. Consider the dictionary meaning of the word oblique. The New Oxford Dictionary of American ...
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1answer
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Can you ask questions ending with “are you/do you/did you etc.”?

Tired, are you? Cold outside, is it? Seen him around, have you? See her, did you? These sentences might not be grammatical, but I'd like to know if they would be frowned upon.
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What is the technical difference between “Don't” and “Do not” and “Aren't” and “Are not” in a question? [duplicate]

When asking a question in English, it's common to use the contraction "don't" or "aren't." At the same time, though, you can also use "do not" and "are not" For example, you can say "Aren't you ...
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Uncommon subjunctive inversion in a negative clause in the pluperfect: “had not millions been swept away”

Voters in 2008 would have seen he didn’t measure up then, had not millions been swept away with emotion and wish-fulfillment. (source) This line reads odd even jarring to me with a weird inversion ...
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Effect of negative statement after the conjuction 'and'

I just read the following statement, 100% Administrator Trust Administrators have and will never have access to any unencrypted data. I am sure that author wanted to imply that (1) Administrators ...
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“he has almost nothing” or “he hasn't almost anything”?

So, I'm helping a friend of mine who has just started learning English. He wants to say "He has almost nothing to eat in his cupboards" using the negative form. Is "he hasn't almost anything to eat ...
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51 views

“no license is defined …” or “no licenses are defined …”

Should I say "no license is defined for ..." or "no licenses are defined for ..."? If both are correct, which are preferable? A quick internet search shows the former is used more frequently. Yet, ...
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2answers
259 views

How to use don't mind + negative

I am really confused about how to use don't mind in negative sentences. Which one is correct? I can understand you, if you don't mind not speaking so fast. I can understand you, if you don't mind ...
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1answer
2k views

How to answer the inquiry: “Please confirm that you are not working for another company”

I got the following prompt. Please confirm that you are currently not working for another company in this field. If I am not working for any other company, should I choose "Yes" or "...
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Can I omit the “neither” in a neither/nor construction? [duplicate]

Considering this sentence: Something was awry but neither Alice nor Bob knew what. Can I omit the neither here? Something was awry but Alice nor Bob knew what. It sounds reasonable, but I ...

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