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Questions tagged [noun-phrases]

Phrases which, as a unit, act as a noun; and whose heads are nouns or pronouns. English noun phrases can include (among many other possibilities) articles or determiners such as "the" and "a" and one or more adjectives or other nouns used attributively followed by the head noun itself.

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53 views

‘Dog issue’: a compound or a noun phrase?

I’m so confused of the following expression: ‘the hot dog issue’. The dialogue is following: A: Have you heard of the hot dog issue? B: Yes, I have. These days, the dog’s euthanasia problem is very ...
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0answers
25 views

What are the nominal forms of the verb phrases “to wear”/“to put on”?

I'm curious if there are nominal forms for the verbs phrases given in the title. Knowing the definition of "nominal/nominalization", how would you nominalize the phrases "to wear/to put on", such as ...
3
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2answers
71 views

Noun clause (singular all the time?)

I have asked one grammarian about this and she ended up being unsure of her answer. Question: is there a possibility that a noun clause is used in a plural manner? For instance: - Her eyes and nose ...
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1answer
63 views

Can a sentence have no verb except in what would otherwise be its noun phrase?

Can a sentence have no verb except in what would otherwise be its noun phrase? e.g. The car in the street I walk down. I'm guessing that "the street I walk down" would be the noun phrase, and it ...
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2answers
28 views

“Making music” and “music making” as a noun

I have always been wondering if one of these forms is more correct in formal writing: The verb-ing + noun form and the noun + verb-ing form. For example: Making music is a skill anyone can learn. ...
3
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1answer
33 views

Some types of nouns feel ungrammatical in “His every [noun]”?

Abstract nouns, specifically nouns related to feelings, feel natural: Set A: His every {whim, desire, need, wish} should be satisfied by the council. However, concrete nouns feel wrong. Set B:...
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1answer
87 views

For the linguists among us: I like loud singing vs I like singing loudly

Can you explain why using "loud" as either an adjective or an adverb changes the meaning of the sentence. Is it just an English convention, or is there something deeper going on? I like loud singing =...
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1answer
56 views

Function of fractions in NPs + form of subsequent verb

I have two questions about the clause two thirds of the book deals with WWII: i) how do we analyse the subject of this clause from a syntactic point of view? I'd analyse it as a NP, with the ...
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2answers
1k views

Grammatical name and function of “the end of the day” [closed]

What's the grammatical name of the end of the day here, and what is its grammatical function? The sentence is this: There was always a huge quantity of food left over at the end of the day.
2
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1answer
40 views

NPs - pre-/postmodifiers

Would you consider "both" in the following NPs rather as a predeterminer or a conjunction? If it's a predeterminer, it would determine both NPs, right? The swimming pool is both a great place to ...
2
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2answers
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Which of these nouns does the relative clause go with?

I have this sentence: John inadvertently broke the window of Mary's car, which was bought just two weeks ago. Which meaning should I understand between "Mary's car was bought two weeks ago" and "...
3
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2answers
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Please put it on the rack above yourself

Why do we say Could you please put it on the rack above you? In other words, why is there no reflexive needed here? Can we also say "above yourself”, that is, use a reflexive pronoun?
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3answers
74 views

Should 'be' or 'is' follow 'that'

Which is correct and why? 'a proposal that the resolution be adopted' or 'a proposal that the resolution is adopted'
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2answers
318 views

What is the grammatical function of the NP (or clause?) in this sentence?

I just came across this sentence in a newspaper: The mill ceased production in 1982, an early warning of another revolution on a global scale. I know it is a perfectly grammatical sentence and I'...
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1answer
20 views

Publish Settings

In a software I am building, there is a section of the user interface for setting preferences regarding how the content will be published. I see a lot of software applications using the phrase "...
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1answer
301 views

In “A plethora of”, should I use “A” always? [closed]

A plethora of problems Plethora of problems Are both ok? Because in many articles, "A" is not written.
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2answers
454 views

Which one is correct to say 3 in 1 celebration or 3 in 1 celebrations

I'm making one tarpaulin for my mom, dad and brother and we don’t know which one is correct to say: three-in-one celebrations a three-in-one celebration In other words, is three-in-one celebration(...
2
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1answer
550 views

How to use “same” as an adverb?

I have the following sentence: An uncommitted player reacts to different alliance types the same. I may as well say “...in the same way” but want to keep it short if possible. Is this a correct ...
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1answer
88 views

English word or phrase that is a more general version of “forge” or “foundry” [closed]

I have been google searching and racking my brain trying to think of a word or phrase that captures the essence of "a place the specializes in making things". I like both the term forge and foundry, ...
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3answers
213 views

Can a noun be an adverb? [duplicate]

This question, which I first posed on the ELL site a few weeks ago, remains effectively unanswered. Although there an answer did finally get posted, it seemed to be more of a parody of an answer than ...
6
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2answers
349 views

Similar adjectives to “worth”

This laptop is worth $140. Here worth does not need a following preposition. However, when I say, for example: I am curious about his motivation behind his decision. The word curious is an ...
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1answer
685 views

superlative + relative clause

An earlier question (Relative clauses: “I did the best I could.”) asks about the antecedent of the relative clause, and there are two answers there: The one (by @Man_From_India) accepted as the best ...
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1answer
74 views

Disambiguating the noun phrase “a pretty egg box”

Does "a pretty egg box" always mean "a pretty box of eggs" rather than "a box of pretty eggs"? More precisely, is "adjective adjunct-noun head-noun" always interpreted as "adjective (adjunct-noun ...
6
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5answers
291 views

Why is “I see a few trees” correct but “I see a many trees” not?

Why is "I see a few trees" grammatically correct but "I see a many trees" not? I notice that "I see few trees" and "I see many trees" are both grammatically correct, since "few" and "many" are both ...
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1answer
1k views

Near or Nearly, when used with 10% of

If we consider the two sentences: On Mondays, near 10% of the workforce report sick; On Mondays, nearly 10% of the workforce report sick; I am inclined to think that the latter is correct. ...
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0answers
174 views

Is there such a thing as the “indirect complement” of a noun?

CaGEL* explains the concept of "indirect complements" on page 443 as follows: If it's the complement of a noun, be it direct or indirect, it's part of a noun phrase (NP) headed by the noun, right? So,...
4
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1answer
127 views

What is the correct way to say “It was this week that Justin and my lives changed forever”?

What is the correct way to indicate "Justin and I" as being possessive of our individual lives in this sentence? Is there a way to do this without restructuring the sentence? A friend of mine posted ...
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2answers
296 views

How to determine if a pre-head dependent of a noun is a complement or a modifier

These examples are from CGEL*. a linguistics student a first-year student CGEL says 'linguistics' is a complement of the noun 'student', whereas 'first-year' is a modifier of the noun '...
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0answers
74 views

a verb phrase acting as a complement of a noun

In a noun phrase (NP), a verb phrase (VP) can act as a complement of a noun as follows: OPEC's decision to cut production by more than 1.5m barrels a day the option to replace you with your ...
2
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1answer
250 views

What’s the correct use of “last/late/latter/latter” in time expressions?

I always get these adjectives and determiners confused as regards their use and shades of meaning. Let's take a structure meaning “in the last few years”. Would it be right to use any of the following ...
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0answers
39 views

“guide you to make…” What part of speech is to-infinitive “to make..”?

You can use his or her experiences to guide you to make the best decisions in your life. In this sentence, I wonder what part of speech "to make the best decisions in your life" is. Is it NP? or ...
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1answer
311 views

Usage of 'a' before two nouns

Is it valid to use 'a' to describe two nouns? For example: "I am going to town to get a burger and chips" or "they do a nice burger and chips" The concern I have is I am not sure if it is valid to ...
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0answers
23 views

Is the phrase 'have started a 12-day trip to Asia on Sunday' a noun-phrase?

In the sentence: Trump has reiterated his rhetoric of North Korea on its nuclear and missile programs since have started a 12-day trip to Asia on Sunday. The phrase following the word 'since' should ...
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1answer
2k views

Can an adverb modify a noun?

Is it right to say: the scientifically literate? The reason I ask is that "The literate" is a noun. And the adverb scientifically modifies it. But as far as I know, adverbs cannot modifies noun. ...
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6answers
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Why is it that in English we put the colour before the object but in many other European languages they put the colour after the object?

I have noticed that in English we put the colour before the object. For instance we, would say White House but in Spanish it would be Casa Blanca (House White) or in French they would say for ...
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1answer
170 views

Clarifying phrases that could be apposition

I have a question around apposition, and would like to ensure I’m not overlooking anything. I’m editing an article where there are multiple instances of phrases that I would usually cordon off with a ...
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2answers
13k views

A friend of John's / John's friend

The question: Suppose John is my friend, and I am introducing myself to his brother, should I say "I am a friend of John's" or "I am John's friend" ?? I would use the former, but some ...
2
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1answer
106 views

How do you parse the sentence “What is it about cheetahs that make them so fast”

I have been working through a grammar book, and I have learned a lot. However, I have trouble when it comes to question type sentences. My best guess is that "What is it about cheetahs" is a noun ...
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1answer
893 views

What is the head noun in a noun 'and' noun phrase?

In a phrase like 'each has a different style and attitude' which is the head noun? Is it right that the head noun can only ever be one word, so I couldn't say it was 'style and attitude'?
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2answers
161 views

Should a foreign phrase that modifies an English noun go before or after that noun in English?

I’m thinking of the placement of the Latin phrase, ad hominem as it is used in English, not as it is used in Latin. Should it precede or follow its noun? In other words, are both of these two ...
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2answers
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What is the origin of “Pointed Question”?

From the definition of pointed, we know that "pointed question" is something like: "A "sharp", piercing, or directed question". And "pointed question" has been in English since, roughly, the American ...
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3answers
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Is “my hardest” a direct object in “I will try my hardest”?

I will try my hardest. I am confusing myself by trying to figure out the grammatical relations in this sentence. It is not clear to me whether my hardest is a direct object here. If it is not, what ...
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0answers
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Go + to + noun phrase [duplicate]

Does the construct "Go + to + noun phrase" always express going somewhere, a specific physical location? For example: Go to school Go to the movies Go to the nearest store They went to Paris We will ...
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2answers
180 views

2.0 technology or technology 2.0? [closed]

When I'm using 2.0 as an adjective, does it sound smoother to place it before the noun or after? Context: I'm talking about a magic trick involving an iPad. As it involves new technology, this magic ...
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2answers
186 views

Is << noun + “for” + gerund >> a valid noun phrase construction to indicate purpose of the head noun in a normal sentence (i.e. not in a title)?

The following two sentences are patentese (written in language used in a patent): A display apparatus includes a display device for displaying an image. The display apparatus may include an ...
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1answer
974 views

What’s the reason for the zero article after a preposition and countable noun in “a change of X” and in “a switch from X to Y”?

I am a non-native speaker of English and therefore need your help. The question is: why do we use the zero article in the phrases “a change of X” and “a switch from X to Y”? For instance: a change ...
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1answer
294 views

Should it be “demand” or “the demand”?

Demand for new cars in the U.S. increased in 2016. We expect demand for new cars to increase in 2017. Demand for new cars in the U.S. increased in 2016. We expect the demand for new cars to increase ...
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Can an infinitive noun phrase be used as the subject of a question?

It is fine to say: To get the details is very important But is it OK to say: Is to get the details very important?
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2answers
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noun phrases vs. prepositional phrases

What is the relationship between a noun phrase and a prepositional phrase? I have found out that both work as complements to each other, and that prepositional phrases work as noun phrases.
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2answers
197 views

Blind, compulsive adherence to the rules, regardless of circumstance [duplicate]

I'm looking for a word, term, or phrase that refers to a type of behaviour; somewhat similar to what's commonly known as "Malicious Compliance"; but without the necessary implication of malice ...