Questions tagged [noun-phrases]

Phrases which, as a unit, act as a noun; and whose heads are nouns or pronouns. English noun phrases can include (among many other possibilities) articles or determiners such as "the" and "a" and one or more adjectives or other nouns used attributively followed by the head noun itself.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
5
votes
1answer
175 views

The traditional grammar term for 'nominals'

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 329) has a section titled 'Nominals': Intermediate between the noun and the NP we recognise a category of nominals: [3] a. the old man ...
4
votes
2answers
265 views

Is 'president' in 'run for president' a bare role NP?

A Student's Introduction to English Grammar says: A bare role NP is a singular NP that is ‘bare’ in the sense of lacking the determiner which would elsewhere be required, and that denotes some kind ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

The way which you should hold them

The Cambridge Grammar of the english Language, page 224, reads Complements are most often NPs, and conversely NPs are usually complements. Some NPs can occur with adjunct function, but they tend ...
1
vote
1answer
77 views

A small sliver of moon rock

In the following sentences, does 'small' function as an adverb or an adjective? Visitors will be astounded at the amazing exhibits; one of these is a small sliver of moon rock that visitors are ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Noun phrases + Colons + SemiColons

Given: John was causing obstruction: the act of preventing passage or progress. or The doctor said: "you need medical attention". What do the constituents of these phrases look like? Given that ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Noun phrases and which/where

does a noun phrase followed by a 'which' or 'where' clause form another noun phrase? example 1: *The fast car which fly's In this case, does 'The fast car which fly's' form a noun phase? My ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Prepositions and Noun Phrases

does a noun phrase followed by a prepositional phrase form another noun phrase? Example: The road to hell 'The road' and 'hell' form two separate noun phrases. Does, 'The road to hell' ...
-1
votes
2answers
37 views

Tricky Noun Phrase Extraction [closed]

a woman who I liked and was dating Given this sentence I think the noun phrases should be a woman who I and a woman is this correct, or should the 'who' and 'I' pronouns also be considered a ...
-4
votes
1answer
74 views

Is it really correct to say that some nouns are countable and others are uncountable?

It is generally accepted practice in linguistics that common nouns are classified into count nouns (aka, countable nouns) and non-count nouns (aka, uncountable nouns or mass nouns). For example, in ...
7
votes
2answers
411 views

You two are shallow. [fused-head NP?]

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 410) defines "Fused-head NPs" as follows: Fused-head NPs are those where the head is combined with a dependent function that in ordinary NPs is ...
-2
votes
2answers
87 views

When does a fused-head NP require a definite determiner?

In section 9.3 Fusion of internal modifier and head, The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 417) says: (d) Modifiers denoting colour, provenance, and composition [25] i Henrietta ...
4
votes
1answer
271 views

'Us students' - Does this apposition need a comma?

Can a pronoun be used in apposition without comma? A few of us students have participated in the match. This sentence looks quite awkward at first glance. Is this sentence gramatically correct? I ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

How to analyze “dearly beloved”?

I'm curious about the phrase “dearly beloved”. – It looks to me to be a phrase consisting of an adverb (dearly) modifying a noun (beloved). But I thought adverbs could only modify verbs or adjectives? ...
0
votes
2answers
72 views

Categorial grammar, Is 'leg' an adjective in 'skipping leg days'

I am working on CCG (combinatory categorial grammar), which assigns categories to words. So I was wondering if 'leg' is adjective, or just another noun in the phrase "skipping leg days". Or is "leg ...
3
votes
1answer
134 views

How the west was won - Is this a noun phrase?

I'm trying to determine what the following types of phrases (in bold within the sentences below) would be called. I want to say they're noun phrases, but I may be wrong. To me, these resolve to ...
2
votes
2answers
127 views

‘Dog issue’: a compound or a noun phrase?

I’m so confused of the following expression: ‘the hot dog issue’. The dialogue is following: A: Have you heard of the hot dog issue? B: Yes, I have. These days, the dog’s euthanasia problem is very ...
3
votes
2answers
105 views

Noun clause (singular all the time?)

I have asked one grammarian about this and she ended up being unsure of her answer. Question: is there a possibility that a noun clause is used in a plural manner? For instance: - Her eyes and nose ...
0
votes
1answer
81 views

Can a sentence have no verb except in what would otherwise be its noun phrase?

Can a sentence have no verb except in what would otherwise be its noun phrase? e.g. The car in the street I walk down. I'm guessing that "the street I walk down" would be the noun phrase, and it ...
0
votes
2answers
237 views

“Making music” and “music making” as a noun

I have always been wondering if one of these forms is more correct in formal writing: The verb-ing + noun form and the noun + verb-ing form. For example: Making music is a skill anyone can learn. ...
3
votes
1answer
40 views

Some types of nouns feel ungrammatical in “His every [noun]”?

Abstract nouns, specifically nouns related to feelings, feel natural: Set A: His every {whim, desire, need, wish} should be satisfied by the council. However, concrete nouns feel wrong. Set B:...
2
votes
1answer
125 views

For the linguists among us: I like loud singing vs I like singing loudly

Can you explain why using "loud" as either an adjective or an adverb changes the meaning of the sentence. Is it just an English convention, or is there something deeper going on? I like loud singing =...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Function of fractions in NPs + form of subsequent verb

I have two questions about the clause two thirds of the book deals with WWII: i) how do we analyse the subject of this clause from a syntactic point of view? I'd analyse it as a NP, with the ...
0
votes
2answers
5k views

Grammatical name and function of “the end of the day” [closed]

What's the grammatical name of the end of the day here, and what is its grammatical function? The sentence is this: There was always a huge quantity of food left over at the end of the day.
2
votes
1answer
70 views

NPs - pre-/postmodifiers

Would you consider "both" in the following NPs rather as a predeterminer or a conjunction? If it's a predeterminer, it would determine both NPs, right? The swimming pool is both a great place to ...
2
votes
2answers
64 views

Which of these nouns does the relative clause go with?

I have this sentence: John inadvertently broke the window of Mary's car, which was bought just two weeks ago. Which meaning should I understand between "Mary's car was bought two weeks ago" and "...
3
votes
2answers
75 views

Please put it on the rack above yourself

Why do we say Could you please put it on the rack above you? In other words, why is there no reflexive needed here? Can we also say "above yourself”, that is, use a reflexive pronoun?
2
votes
3answers
78 views

Should 'be' or 'is' follow 'that'

Which is correct and why? 'a proposal that the resolution be adopted' or 'a proposal that the resolution is adopted'
5
votes
2answers
447 views

What is the grammatical function of the NP (or clause?) in this sentence?

I just came across this sentence in a newspaper: The mill ceased production in 1982, an early warning of another revolution on a global scale. I know it is a perfectly grammatical sentence and I'...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

Publish Settings

In a software I am building, there is a section of the user interface for setting preferences regarding how the content will be published. I see a lot of software applications using the phrase "...
-1
votes
1answer
489 views

In “A plethora of”, should I use “A” always? [closed]

A plethora of problems Plethora of problems Are both ok? Because in many articles, "A" is not written.
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Which one is correct to say 3 in 1 celebration or 3 in 1 celebrations

I'm making one tarpaulin for my mom, dad and brother and we don’t know which one is correct to say: three-in-one celebrations a three-in-one celebration In other words, is three-in-one celebration(...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

How to use “same” as an adverb?

I have the following sentence: An uncommitted player reacts to different alliance types the same. I may as well say “...in the same way” but want to keep it short if possible. Is this a correct ...
1
vote
1answer
100 views

English word or phrase that is a more general version of “forge” or “foundry” [closed]

I have been google searching and racking my brain trying to think of a word or phrase that captures the essence of "a place the specializes in making things". I like both the term forge and foundry, ...
5
votes
3answers
406 views

Can a noun be an adverb? [duplicate]

This question, which I first posed on the ELL site a few weeks ago, remains effectively unanswered. Although there an answer did finally get posted, it seemed to be more of a parody of an answer than ...
6
votes
2answers
413 views

Similar adjectives to “worth”

This laptop is worth $140. Here worth does not need a following preposition. However, when I say, for example: I am curious about his motivation behind his decision. The word curious is an ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

superlative + relative clause

An earlier question (Relative clauses: “I did the best I could.”) asks about the antecedent of the relative clause, and there are two answers there: The one (by @Man_From_India) accepted as the best ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

Disambiguating the noun phrase “a pretty egg box”

Does "a pretty egg box" always mean "a pretty box of eggs" rather than "a box of pretty eggs"? More precisely, is "adjective adjunct-noun head-noun" always interpreted as "adjective (adjunct-noun ...
6
votes
5answers
453 views

Why is “I see a few trees” correct but “I see a many trees” not?

Why is "I see a few trees" grammatically correct but "I see a many trees" not? I notice that "I see few trees" and "I see many trees" are both grammatically correct, since "few" and "many" are both ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

Near or Nearly, when used with 10% of

If we consider the two sentences: On Mondays, near 10% of the workforce report sick; On Mondays, nearly 10% of the workforce report sick; I am inclined to think that the latter is correct. ...
2
votes
0answers
282 views

Is there such a thing as the “indirect complement” of a noun?

CaGEL* explains the concept of "indirect complements" on page 443 as follows: If it's the complement of a noun, be it direct or indirect, it's part of a noun phrase (NP) headed by the noun, right? So,...
4
votes
1answer
224 views

What is the correct way to say “It was this week that Justin and my lives changed forever”?

What is the correct way to indicate "Justin and I" as being possessive of our individual lives in this sentence? Is there a way to do this without restructuring the sentence? A friend of mine posted ...
6
votes
2answers
410 views

How to determine if a pre-head dependent of a noun is a complement or a modifier

These examples are from CGEL*. a linguistics student a first-year student CGEL says 'linguistics' is a complement of the noun 'student', whereas 'first-year' is a modifier of the noun '...
1
vote
0answers
84 views

a verb phrase acting as a complement of a noun

In a noun phrase (NP), a verb phrase (VP) can act as a complement of a noun as follows: OPEC's decision to cut production by more than 1.5m barrels a day the option to replace you with your ...
2
votes
1answer
476 views

What’s the correct use of “last/late/latter/latter” in time expressions?

I always get these adjectives and determiners confused as regards their use and shades of meaning. Let's take a structure meaning “in the last few years”. Would it be right to use any of the following ...
1
vote
1answer
510 views

Usage of 'a' before two nouns

Is it valid to use 'a' to describe two nouns? For example: "I am going to town to get a burger and chips" or "they do a nice burger and chips" The concern I have is I am not sure if it is valid to ...
5
votes
1answer
3k views

Can an adverb modify a noun?

Is it right to say: the scientifically literate? The reason I ask is that "The literate" is a noun. And the adverb scientifically modifies it. But as far as I know, adverbs cannot modifies noun. ...
26
votes
6answers
6k views

Why is it that in English we put the colour before the object but in many other European languages they put the colour after the object?

I have noticed that in English we put the colour before the object. For instance we, would say White House but in Spanish it would be Casa Blanca (House White) or in French they would say for ...
0
votes
1answer
180 views

Clarifying phrases that could be apposition

I have a question around apposition, and would like to ensure I’m not overlooking anything. I’m editing an article where there are multiple instances of phrases that I would usually cordon off with a ...
4
votes
2answers
21k views

A friend of John's / John's friend

The question: Suppose John is my friend, and I am introducing myself to his brother, should I say "I am a friend of John's" or "I am John's friend" ?? I would use the former, but some ...
2
votes
1answer
118 views

How do you parse the sentence “What is it about cheetahs that make them so fast”

I have been working through a grammar book, and I have learned a lot. However, I have trouble when it comes to question type sentences. My best guess is that "What is it about cheetahs" is a noun ...