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Questions tagged [noun-phrases]

Phrases which, as a unit, act as a noun; and whose heads are nouns or pronouns. English noun phrases can include (among many other possibilities) articles or determiners such as "the" and "a" and one or more adjectives or other nouns used attributively followed by the head noun itself.

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"That NP is Ving" as a noun phrase: different degrees of acceptability for different nesting?

I am confused that a use that is seemingly grammatical doesn't sound right. That our cattle are ailing is worrying. I find that our cattle are ailing worrying.* Has anyone said of that our cattle are ...
capyman1701's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
65 views

"a shirt in (a) (size) small"

To me, these versions sound natural and idiomatic: I'd like this/a shirt in a small. I'd like this/a shirt in a size small. I'd like this/a shirt in a size 7. Do you have this dress in a 9? She wears ...
desmo's user avatar
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1 answer
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"She was a curious mixture, part grand lady, part wild child." — Is "part grand lady, part wild child" an appositive, supplement and adjunct?

oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: (1) She was a curious mixture, part grand lady, part wild child. my parse: "Part grand lady" is a noun phrase. "Part wild child" is a noun phrase. &...
Loviii's user avatar
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Is 'the' a determiner or a part of the proper noun head? [duplicate]

Is the in eg. The Gambia, The Guardian, The ICJ, The United States,... considered a determiner or is it a part of the proper noun?
serendipity's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
111 views

"to" + infinitive vs. "for" + gerund after noun

In technical writing, we often need to describe things that have a certain purpose: the menu item whose purpose it is to save a file, the code whose purpose it is to send a message, and so on. A ...
Daniel Wolf's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
64 views

Is there premodification in this noun phrase "too many victims"

I have to analyze the noun phrase "too many victims" but I somehow can't figure out whether "too many" is a determiner or premodification. Given the fact too is an adverb and many ...
Alex's user avatar
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2 answers
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How do you parse the noun phrase 'Even the manager herself'?

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Pages 438-9) has these subsections under §13 Peripheral modifiers: (e) Reflexive pronouns [7] [The manager h̲e̲r̲s̲e̲l̲f̲] had approved the proposal.In ...
JK2's user avatar
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Is the highlighted phrase an absolute phrase modifying the main clause or simply an non restrictive appositive?

But no one in Brega had a clear idea of what was happening on the battlefield, not even the few fighters fidgeting by a new barricade outside the refinery’s front gate Source-: https://www.newyorker....
rahul sehrawat's user avatar
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1 answer
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The impediment generates that in relation to which it is an impediment . <-- analysis?

Can someone help me analyze the grammar of the following sentence? In a paradoxical logic, the impediment generates that in relation to which it is an impediment. I'm very confused by "that in ...
bww z's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
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Is the noun phrase "all the way" modifying the prepositional phrase in "all the way around the corner"?

The line stretched all the way around the corner. Is the NP "all the way" modifying the PP "around the corner"?
cookie234's user avatar
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Is the noun modifier "among them a portable anti-tank rocket and a wheel-mounted recoilless rifle" an appositive or absolute phrase?

Higgins was looking at videos coming out of the Daraya region when he noticed several weapons that he had not yet documented in Syria, among them a portable anti-tank rocket and a wheel-mounted ...
rahul sehrawat's user avatar
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1 answer
58 views

What is the grammatical term for a noun after a gerund/infinitive

For instance, there are the sentences "Reading books is good" and "To be a hero is your duty." Could I say that books and "hero" are objects of the verbs reading and To ...
The_Soul_Eater's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
1k views

Can I front an adverbial phrase like "high among the clouds"?

While writing a fantasy narration I created this sentence: High among the clouds a castle floated. My American friend tells me it sounds bad to a native ear. I think he sees a problem with the ...
Atom's user avatar
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Human Asset Development or Human Assets Development

Human Assets Development or Human Asset Development The second one has no "s" at the end of asset. Which is more natural, and is there a rule for this (for example, use a singular noun (...
Steven's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
364 views

Do Temporal Adjuncts Function as External Adjuncts in a Noun Phrase, or Is This Another Grammatical Construct?

In certain pieces often written by journalists and others in the publishing profession, I have come across phrases like the one below (my own example): Tinker Hatfield, today a legend of the Nike ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
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3 answers
183 views

Possessive case with who(m)ever in an object noun phrase

Disclaimer The question put forward as the pretext for mine's closure does not answer my question at all—that question contains “who(m)ever” in a clause acting as an object, which I have no trouble ...
lil' barbussy's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
454 views

Understanding something vs. understanding 'of' something? [duplicate]

"Understanding something" or "understanding of something"? Is there a general rule? Or does it depend on the context? If it is context dependent, what about this sentence: ...
Tomas's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
163 views

How to use adverbial phrases with season/year?

Time adverbial phrases seem very confusing. Google doesn’t show any past questions on this. I’d like to ask how I should write a sentence with a temporal phrase indicating season and year: [subject] [...
desmo's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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Modifiers denoting colour, provenance, and composition in a fused-head noun phrases

In section 9.3 Fusion of internal modifier and head, The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 417) says: (d) Modifiers denoting colour, provenance, and composition [25] i Henrietta likes ...
JK2's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
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I met a man the other day who says he knows you

(1) I met a man the other day who says he knows you. H&P's CGEL (Page 1066) shows this sentence in a subsection called Postposing of relative clause, which starts like this: It is also possible, ...
JK2's user avatar
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0 answers
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What is the more precise name for the noun-phrase 'The Native' / 'The American'? [duplicate]

Been having a nightmare with this: in a phrase such as 'The native knows all this, and laughs to himself every time he spots an allusion to the animal world in the other's words' (Franz Fanon), or '...
LPEnglish's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
74 views

A Specific Instance of Me (object) vs. I (subject)

I was just crafting an email. The sentence was similar to this: You are hereby invited to the Pristine Medal Ceremony, an event which will result in Anthony and me becoming knighted, and receiving ...
bubbleking's user avatar
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0 answers
28 views

Correct form of this sentence

What would be the correct form of the verb in this sentence? They all have a noun clause a the subject followed by to be. What you can do is playing with them. What you can do is to play with them. ...
Shahroq's user avatar
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2 answers
174 views

What word or phrase do you use for not doing something that you intended to do because subconsciously you did not want to do it?

What noun or noun phrase do you use for not doing something that you intended to do because subconsciously you did not want to do it? In speech it is called 'a Freudian slip'. (Merriam Webster online ...
user58319's user avatar
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2 answers
72 views

“The difficulty is we need” vs. “The difficulty is ᴛʜᴀᴛ we need”

Is there a right or wrong answer in the following construction? Am I missing a more elegant way to say this? The main difficulty in the hiring process is we need a fluent French speaker that also ...
fourierwho's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
135 views

She ended up (being??) a rich woman

Somehow they all ended up at my house. ("end up" + prepositional phrase) Well, grades ended up to be unimportant after all as my first job after graduating ended up in a private school with ...
Mr. X's user avatar
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1 answer
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‘to start’ and ‘to starting’, prefaced by ‘key’

I have the following two example sentences: X is the key to starting their communication. X is the key to start their communication. E.g. Patience is the key to starting their communication. Which is ...
1687737's user avatar
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Plural in connection with an "and" and "a mess": "This pull request and merge is a mess" [duplicate]

I wonder if the sentence "This pull request and merge is a mess" has a correct grammar. "pull request and merge" are two words so the verb should possibly be in plural for "...
Finn Årup Nielsen's user avatar
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1 answer
181 views

Quantifiers realised by a noun?

Let's consider the following sentence: He drank [a glass of hot milk]. Here the brackated element is a Noun Phrase (NP). The head noun is glass. My question is can it be classified as a quantifier?
Man_From_India's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
172 views

Multi-layer prepositional phrase

I am having trouble picturing the structure of this preposition phrase from the point of view of generative syntax (PP) My attempt to run it down goes like this: from (preposition) + the point of ...
Eddie Kal's user avatar
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1 answer
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Should it be "Late policy" or "lateness policy"?

I am writing a paper that discusses different policies for accepting assignments after the nominal deadlines. Should I refer to it as a "late policy" or "lateness policy"? Here is ...
Ellen Spertus's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
66 views

Are the maximal noun phrases found by this code incorrect?

I was reading the accepted answer to this question on natural language processing In there an english sentence is given: "Natural language processing (NLP) is a field of computer science, ...
Sidharth Ghoshal's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
85 views

Noun phrases with prepositions and appositions

In this sentence : Later on, experience the otherworldly feel of one of the “Most Beautiful Villages in France”, Riquewihr. Is there a relation between the 2 noun phrases the “Most Beautiful ...
Stephane's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
49 views

A noun phrase vs a question (what vs how)

Let's consider two phrases: What makes work efficient How to say 'Hello' in Chinese The first one can either be a noun phrase (What makes work efficient is careful preparation) or a question (What ...
Daniel's user avatar
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1 vote
4 answers
1k views

Can we ever use "that" and "who" right next to each other?

I’ve learned that we can use that to provide more information for abstract nouns, such as problem, belief, etc. I don’t quite understand what that means, though, so let me try it out. For example, ...
gra's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
27 views

'People living overseas' 'People who live overseas'

In the two noun phrases, 'People living overseas' 'People who live overseas', is there any difference in meaning?
Woodland's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
107 views

Are nominal adjectives and fused-head noun phrases just two different explanations for the same thing?

Are nominal adjectives and fused-head noun phrase (e.g. "the poor") just two different ways of describing the same thing, or is one considered a subset of the other, or are they different ...
tangosquared's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
206 views

When a noun phrase can act as the post-modifier?

According to Oxford Learner's Grammar by John Eastwood [ISBN:0-19-437-597-8], page 187; it is possible for a noun phrase to act as a postmodifier of the head noun. Example: The weather that day was ...
Marat Pussurmanov's user avatar
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0 answers
70 views

Make sure you invite Jill herself(,) <too> [The syntactic function of 'too' and usage of comma]

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Pages 438-9) has this: An NP may contain more than one peripheral modifier, with multiple layers of embedding: [8] i Make sure you invite [Jill herself ...
JK2's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
93 views

Why does "to keep someone posted" mean "to keep someone updated"?

What's the logic behind the meaning of the above phrase?
Harshit's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
73 views

Noun phrase involving "of", plural or singular

I feel that the singular form should be correct, but I'm not sure: "The thickness of papers IS .." "The thickness of papers ARE .." By the way, will it change the result, if we use another noun ...
Emrah Kaya's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
67 views

What does 'spook credentials' mean?

I've encountered this expression on the book "UNIX: A History and a Memoir". One day I was scheduled to do a demo for William Colby, who at the time was the director of the Central Intelligence ...
Felipe1979's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
102 views

the company failure to comply vs the company's failure

I got into an argument with a British native speaker over the following phrase: 'the company failure to comply with its contractual obligations' I'm a non-native speaker, therefore I can't be quite ...
QriS's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
298 views

Identifying the antecedent of an integrated(restrictive) relative clause

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language has this (Page 1061): In [11], CGEL doesn't analyze the determiner no as part of the antecedent of the relative clause. Let's compare [11] with [11a] and ...
JK2's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
231 views

Confusion determining the type of phrase

According to CLIFFS Toefl preparation guide written by Pyle and Page.. A noun phrase is a group of words that ends with a noun. According to this definition the highlighted phrase in the ...
Russell's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
153 views

What are the criteria for allowing repeated bare NPs in coordinate structures?

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Pages 409-410): 8.5 Restricted non-referential interpretations of bare NPs [...] This time, however, our concern is with bare NPs. We confine our ...
JK2's user avatar
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6 votes
0 answers
348 views

Is there an alternative modern approach to the fused-head noun phrase?

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 410) defines "Fused-head NPs" as follows: Fused-head NPs (noun phrases) are those where the head is combined with a dependent function ...
JK2's user avatar
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9 votes
2 answers
576 views

The traditional grammar term for 'nominals'

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 329) has a section titled 'Nominals': Intermediate between the noun and the NP we recognise a category of nominals: [3] a. the old man b. that book ...
JK2's user avatar
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4 votes
3 answers
532 views

Is 'president' in 'run for president' a bare role noun phrase?

A Student's Introduction to English Grammar says: A bare role NP is a singular NP that is ‘bare’ in the sense of lacking the determiner which would elsewhere be required, and that denotes some kind ...
listeneva's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
80 views

The way which you should hold them

The Cambridge Grammar of the english Language, page 224, reads Complements are most often NPs, and conversely NPs are usually complements. Some NPs can occur with adjunct function, but they tend ...
GJC's user avatar
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