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Questions tagged [modifiers]

Questions about modifiers.

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1answer
80 views

What's the difference between adjuncts and modifiers?

All types of adjuncts (my conclusion from wikipedia.org): An adnominal adjunct is an adjunct modifying noun, i.e. it's dependent words in noun phrases (a good boy, the discussion before the game). ...
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1answer
63 views

Would this sentence be considered grammatically correct [closed]

A sci-fi middle-grade suspense novel about a 14-year-old girl who must retrieve the stone, preventing the rise of a human nuclear weapon.
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1answer
48 views

Can an adjective modify the entire sentence?

I came across the following sentence, and I was so curious about “effective next Monday.” Mr. Michael has resigned his position as senior sales manager, effective next Monday. Effective is ...
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1answer
65 views

Which modifies which

He took his son back to school. Does to school modifies back or the other way around?
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4answers
481 views

What is the difference between an adjective and a noun modifier?

"My tire was damaged. I took the damaged tire to the garage." In the above example, the book (summit) refers to the past participles of the transitive verbs as "noun modifiers" and not "adjectives". ...
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35 views

“there exists” or “S exists”

In the formal writing such as a conference/journal paper, which of the following two phrases are correct? there exists noun Noun exists In addition, can we use the following phrases to modify the ...
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1answer
49 views

Should I use a hyphen with a latin phrase that modifies an adjective that modifies a noun?

I understand that Latin phrases are not normally hyphenated. I also understand that adjective-modifying adverbs normally do receive a hyphen (despite this parenthetically invoked exception). So, which ...
3
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1answer
89 views

Do you use a subject pronoun or object pronoun before or in a gerundial modifier?

For example: The Pope became the anointed leader of kings and emperors, they becoming his subjects. -or- The Pope became the anointed leader of kings and emperors, them becoming his ...
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2answers
106 views

Is the word solvent in “solvent mixture” used as a noun or an adjective?

when I say a solvent mixture in chemistry, I found several references that say both "solvents mixture" and "solvent mixture". I wonder if the word solvent is modifying as a noun or an adjective. If ...
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1answer
63 views

What part of speech is “almost” when applied to an adjective? [closed]

If I say that "the box is almost flat" what part of speech is "almost"? I can't say "the box is almost", so it does not appear to be an adjective itself. It seems to be a word that modifies the ...
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0answers
28 views

Hear it used this way? - Complement or Modifier

While writing the following sentence I was curious whether the sentence was correct. But after checking COCA, I came to now that similar expressions are in use. The sentence I wrote is: Have you ...
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1answer
18 views

How would you punctuate this?

I've come across a heading I don't know how to punctuate: 10 Questions for Betty Smith – Author, Chocolate and Money Lover Obviously she is a lover of chocolate and money, but am not sure how/...
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4answers
126 views

A modifier clause after “one of the xxxs” – singular or plural?

I wrote a sentence of the kind "XXX contains one of the most powerful lubricants that prevent rusty gears, the main cause of machine failure." This is too wordy, of course, but never mind. The grammar ...
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0answers
49 views

Why aren't degree modifiers complements?

As far as I've been able to figure out, in the CaGEL* framework, complements are items that are licensed by some other element (generally the head), so that if an item has to be licensed, it is per ...
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1answer
41 views

On using a modifier with a (comma-separated) list

I have a couple of related questions, one of which is a concrete question and the other of which is more general/abstract. My first question is in regards to the following sentence, which was taken ...
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2answers
196 views

What is the nature of, and syntactic distinction between, modifier and complement?

I am struggling to understand the syntactic relevance of the distinction between complement and modifier in theories such as the one presented in the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language by ...
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2answers
67 views

When referring to two people who have passed on, is it necessary to repeat “the late”?

Which one is correct? A. Authors like the late John Smith and John Doe have … B. Authors like the late John Smith and the late John Doe have … Thanks
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0answers
53 views

Can a prepositional phrase modify a noun when there is a verb between the noun and the prepositional phrase?

For example, Forecasts have emerged of heavy rain. A structurally sound argument was presented of the characteristics and implications of economic recessions. Is the prepositional phrase ...
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1answer
67 views

What part of speech is the word hair in 'hair spray'? [duplicate]

Consider the following sentence as an example. I used some hair spray. What part of speech is hair? Intuitively, I want to say it's an adjective modifying spray since hair spray is two separate words ...
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1answer
35 views

“Personal Use Program” or “Personal-Use Program”?

Help me settle a discussion on this topic. Everywhere I look, within my company's internal documents as well as documents from other companies, a "personal use" program is not hyphenated. A colleague ...
2
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1answer
207 views

What's the FUNCTIONAL difference between a supplement and an adjunct/modifier?

I'm trying to understand the difference between supplements and adjuncts/modifiers. In my search for enlightenment, I've come across a number of entries and posts, of which I think this one summarises ...
2
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1answer
112 views

How to tell which word a prepositional phrase is modifying?

Often it is obvious what word is being modified by a prepositional phrase, but sometimes it isn't. When it's not immediately clear, I often ask myself questions like: Does this phrase answer "where ...
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1answer
140 views

Determining licensing in CaGel by means of substitution test

I read a comment on licensing in another post, which made me revisit this concept. Unfortunately I haven't got access to CaGEL – only to its "little brother", Huddleston and Pullum's A Student's ...
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2answers
101 views

Indirect complement or postmodifier in NP

In the sentence [1] He is the most talented artist (that) I know what is (that) I know in terms of function – an indirect complement, licensed by most, or simply a common postmodifier? Why? ...
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2answers
72 views

What's the extended meaning by adding “one” before a noun?

Example: Elaine: "You know those label makers make great gifts, I just gave one for Tim Whatley for Christmas." Jerry: "!@#$" Elaine: "Who gave you that?" Jerry: "One Tim Whatley." What does the ...
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3answers
8k views

“I'll let you know once I have any” vs. “once I have some”

I have no questions so far but I will let you know once I have any. Is this grammatical, or should it be "... once I have some" instead?
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2answers
353 views

Problems of Use of Participle in Academic Writing: “When considering” VS “When considered”

I have questions about the participle phrase in academic writing which are related to the dangling modifiers of 3 cases. Could you explain me more the appropriate use of sentences with the participle ...
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1answer
478 views

What does “if known” refer to at the end of a sentence?

What does the "if known" refer to in this sentence? : The Notice to Suspend shall specify the reason for suspension, which part of the Works shall be suspended, the effective date of the suspension ...
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1answer
5k views

“Reasons for…” or “Reasons that…”

While taking a PSAT practice test, I was told by the answer key that the underlined sentence below is grammatically correct and does not need to be changed. In my experience "reasons," when used in ...
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2answers
73 views

What kind of phrase is “…better at finding patterns of burglary than of, say, murder”?

Predictive-policing systems are imperfect, better at finding patterns of burglary than of, say, murder. I know that "better at finding patterns of burglary than of, say, murder." is describing ...
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1answer
277 views

Why is it “five-barred gate” not “five-bar gate”?

Is the "bar" here a past participle? Why it needs to be added an "-ed"? Another example I recently encountered is "pink-haired girl". "Hair" is a noun, why add "-ed"? And we always say "5-year-old ...
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1answer
57 views

Misplaced Modifier

He kept a black book of all the girls he had dated in the past in his desk. Is "in his desk" a misplaced modifier, or is the sentence grammatically correct? Kindly elaborate.
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1answer
193 views

misplaced modifiers in a sentence

I have these two sentences: The family of Johnsons in 1980 are heartbroken. They, like all families around them, appear to have given up. When I read it, a lot of things are wrong and awkward ...
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1answer
138 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct? Adverb clause

When I got back my test recently, I oddly found that my English teacher thinks that there is an error in the usage of adverbial clauses in "It seems that moving the body while learning, which ...
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1answer
8k views

Non-existing or nonexisting [closed]

What is correct in English, non-existing or nonexisting? Searching sources on Google doesn't help much as both variants are widely present there. Onelook Dictionary Search doesn't show much about ...
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1answer
389 views

Uncountable followed by countable nouns - “is” or “are”? [duplicate]

I have a question about the following sentence: The only artwork in evidence is/are some Greek vases and terracotta objects. Is it "artwork" that selects the verb-form (therefore "is"), or "Greek ...
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4answers
2k views

Is “crucially important” redundant?

I've come across the phrase crucially important many times. More than 100,000 hits on Google Scholar, and it even appears in some of the answers on this site. However, crucial already means "...
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1answer
271 views

Is the definite/indefinite article a complement or a modifier of a noun?

The definite/indefinite article -- the/a(n) -- always comes before a noun and can never be used without a noun. Is the definite/indefinite article a complement or a modifier of a noun?
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0answers
81 views

a verb phrase acting as a complement of a noun

In a noun phrase (NP), a verb phrase (VP) can act as a complement of a noun as follows: OPEC's decision to cut production by more than 1.5m barrels a day the option to replace you with your ...
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2answers
119 views

What is the term for multiple-long phrases in a single sentence?

The bark of the tree had progressively gained pallor and, like some town under siege, thanks to the repeated assaults of snowstorms and subzero temperatures, it was hard to imagine how this tree ...
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2answers
239 views

Intelligent-intensive or Intelligence-intensive?

Which of the titular phrases is the most appropriate and correct to express a work or task that mainly relies on the intelligence of an entity? Stats of matches from Google Books: Intelligent-...
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0answers
49 views

What gets modified? Confusions with “only” (basic categorical logic)

While learning basic categorical logic, I came across the following sentences: "All kitchens are places for eating" "All kitchens are only places for eating" "All kitchens are places only for eating" ...
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64 views

complicated / complex and possible modifiers

A text I wrote (well, translated actually) contained the phrase: "the question is highly complex". After more than a year (!) it's been returned to me with some corrections, and the phrase above ...
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2answers
635 views

Should “gerund + objective” be modified by adjectives or adverbs?

I read from TheFreeDictionary http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Gerunds.htm the examples "Studying too hastily will result in a poor grade." and "Working from home allows me to spend more time with my ...
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1answer
181 views

Adverbial modifier with the insertion of comma

I was studying about participles and one site a guy asked the following question: How would the meaning of the following sentences differ from each other? 1. The beach, located on the far side of ...
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0answers
423 views

Modifiers used to modify whole clauses/sentences - Any additional examples?

I've been interested recently in modifiers that modify not a specific grammatical unit--e.g., nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, or phrases of each--but an entire sentence or clause. For example, see ...
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3answers
596 views

A weird case : “The kitchen’s window” vs “The kitchen window”

I just came across this article (noun modifiers), and I'm surprised that these two nouns mean different things: The kitchen’s window The kitchen window The Ngram shows zero usage of the first ...
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1answer
205 views

Adverb modifier in action

What does the adverb ever modify in the sentence? “They experienced the coldest weather ever.”
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38 views

How is Mark Nichol using the term “free modifier”?

In 8 types of parenthetical phrases, he includes Free modifier: A free modifier is an unspecialized interruption of additional information: “I stood up and, brushing off my pants, continued ...
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1answer
42 views

Removing modifier error

The modifier error in the sentence below creates ambiguity regarding who is on the way home - John or the huge man. John saw a huge man on his way home What are the different ways to fix this? ...