Questions tagged [gerunds-vs-participles]

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"Employees, including young ones who profess to caring about DEI…" Why "caring"?

Employees, including young ones who profess to caring about DEI, may also put material concerns ahead of moral ones if the job market tightens. Why is caring used, instead of care or be caring? is ...
user330039's user avatar
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Taking long strides, he covered the distance in short time ( gerund or participle)

Taking long strides, he covered the distance in short time. Taking long strides is a gerund or participle? Explain please.
Saima Abid's user avatar
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-ing word as modifier of a noun: Verb or attributive/deverbal Noun?

Note: I sat on this question for quite some time, but after wracking my brain on it for quite a while, I finally caved and decided to ask it as a question. When I say “dining room,” most people, I ...
Taylor B.'s user avatar
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Can a gerund immediately follow a present participle? [duplicate]

For example: “Academic integrity violations include any action involving distributing course materials to others.” I understand “involving” to be a present participle, because it functions as an ...
Immanuel Kant's user avatar
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1 answer
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Possessive pronoun + gerund confusion

I am confused over whether the following sentence contains a gerund and, therefore, whether I can precede that gerund with a possessive pronoun: "I can't prevent your being offended." Is &...
JJ_Doogal's user avatar
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Does the term USING in the sentence act as gerund or participle? [closed]

Whether they are good or bad, we can draw a comparison using their behaviour! Is using a gerund/present participle in this sentence?
user461833's user avatar
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1 answer
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Ambiguity between present participle, ing-adjectives, and gerund

"It is exciting." Is context the only way to classify exciting in one of these grammatical terms (present participle, ing-adjectives, and gerund)?
Gabriel Caldas's user avatar
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What is this grammar formation called and how is it used ' to + verb + ing ' [duplicate]

A student gave me this example: ...doesn't have an objection in principle to using the Consulting Agreement dated... She wanted to know how to use this construction (to + verb + ing) and what it is ...
Sam's user avatar
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3 answers
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In modern grammar, why are gerunds and participles grouped?

As I have delved deeper into the world of modern grammar, I have noticed frequent references to 'gerund-participial' clauses. Most resources would divide gerunds and participles (past and present) ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
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Why was gerund not using in this sentence as parallel balance?

In the following sentence, why the author uses 'stole' and 'stood' instead of 'stealing' and 'standing', since the author use 'seeing' the gerund at the second clause. An elderly seaman came to the ...
conan's user avatar
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Is “using” a gerund in this sentence?

“He was saved using advanced medical technology.” I think “using” would be a gerund if you said “He was saved by using advanced medical technology,” where the gerund is the object of the preposition “...
Mark's user avatar
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I was happy playing the piano (gerund or participle?)

In the sentence, “I was happy playing the piano,” is the phrase “playing the piano” a participial (Playing the piano, I was happy) or a gerund with an elided, or assumed, preposition (I was happy [...
David Marlowe's user avatar
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5 answers
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In "experience teaching this material over a number of years convinced me that", is "experience" a noun adjunct?

In an MIT textbook from 2007 the author, Robert G. Gallager, writes in the preface: My original purpose was to write an undergraduate text on digital communication, but experience teaching this ...
Norbert's user avatar
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2 answers
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Dangling Participle and Gerund

" Inspiring, informing and celebrating teachers since 1988". Is this sentence right? I'm confuse whether all -ing verbs in this sentence act as a gerund as a noun or a present participial as an ...
Fikri's user avatar
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Can a gerund be used to start a question title? [duplicate]

For the sake of using less characters in a title I often change a question like: How do I learn to ride a bike? to: Learning to ride a bike? I know these two constructs are not identical in ...
PolyGeo's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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An article before gerunds

I wonder how to distinguish words with a verb base and the -ing suffix. I have found that they fall into the following 3 classes: 1) gerundial noun (he had witnessed the killing of the birds), 2) ...
Through The Wonders's user avatar
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1 answer
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Is the word "moving" here a gerund or a present participle? [closed]

Is the word moving as used here in these two sentences gerund or a present participle? The five stages of moving to a brand new place. One of the most exciting parts of moving to a new place.
Jonathan's user avatar
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1 answer
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Possessive-gerund/ sentence structure

Here's an alternative/clearer version of my original question: Consider the following sentence: Instead of his being stationed on a plank, I want him on a pedestal. This shows the possessive ...
learning's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
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What is the grammatical construction behind the word "climbing" in the phrase "climbing wall" or the word "running" in the phrase "running" shoes?

I am curious about the grammar behind the word "climbing" in the phrase "climbing wall" (or the word "running" in the phrase "running shoes," etc). I first thought it was an adjective describing the ...
Matthew S.'s user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
2k views

In "Nobody was surprised at John being absent", is "being" a present participle modifying "John" or a gerund whose subject is "John"?

Some time ago I learned the difference between a present participle and a gerund, so today I decided to pass any online test to make sure I understand it. I passed it having made only one mistake, ...
user151486's user avatar
12 votes
4 answers
16k views

What is a gerund? A noun or a verb? 'His smoking upset me’

I've been studying the Huddleston and Pullum book for four months now. So far only one thing confuses me: the identity of gerund. Is it a noun or a verb? His constant smoking upset me. smoking ...
The Beefer Fan's user avatar