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Questions tagged [adjectives]

Adjectives are just one of several different types of noun modifiers, typically used to premodify or describe a noun. Do not confuse adjectives with nouns used attributively to modify other nouns. Adjectives have comparative and superlative degrees, can be used as predicate adjectives in copulae, and can themselves by modified by intensifiers and adverbs but not by other adjectives. Nouns in attribution fail all those tests.

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Since 'few' is used for countable nouns and 'less' is for uncountable nouns

Since 'few' is used for countable things and 'Less' is for uncountable things then why do we say; I have less than 2 days/months/years. ? Yes, time is an uncountable concept but we sure can count ...
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What's the best adjective for a person who can endure an extreme pain? [duplicate]

I'm trying to write about a person, but I can't think of an adjective to describe his character. Is there a good adjective to describe a person who can endure an extreme pain?
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adjective order: “long boring report” or “boring long report”?

A long boring annual report A boring long annual report which of the above is right? I learnt the adjective order of DOSA SCOMP, which means the adjective order should be as below: ...
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Can “no-fault” be used as a noun?

All outputs from Cambridge Dictionary, Merriem Webster Dictionary and others like oxforddictionaries state it as an adjective. My question is can it be used as a noun? If yes, could you provide ...
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How to find out if an adjective is cumulative?

Being not a native speaker, I find it hard to differentiate coordinate adjectives from cumulative ones, especially when punctuating a sentence. For example, let's look at this sample "effective, ...
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What is an idiom to describe someone who takes sides with both of two opposing sides?

What is an idiom (or an adjective) to describe someone who considers and takes sides with both of two opposing sides? I mean someone who, for example, says that both of contrasting sides in an ...
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“Extendable” vs “Extendible” vs “Extensible” vs “Expandable” vs “Expendable”

I am really confused about what is the exact difference between these 5 words. Extendable, Extendible, Extensible, Expandable, and Expendable. I did saw some posts on this website itself but could not ...
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Looking for a specific synonym of “selfish”

A word or phrase that describes best a specific type of person or their behavior. The type of person that would not act upon a threat if said threat is not affecting their personal well-being directly....
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Graded/ungraded adjectives and grading/non-grading adverbs

I saw in the Farlex Grammar Book an explanation of gradable adjectives and graded adverbs. It lists the following words as examples of each category: Gradable adjectives small cold hot difficult sad ...
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Adjective for a person who enjoys taking care of their appearance

After a brief search over StackExchange I've decided to ask my own question. I'm looking for a word to describe someone who enjoys grooming themselves or taking care of their appearance, but without ...
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Is there a mandatory (particular) adjective order when describing something with more than one adjective [duplicate]

When describing something with 3 or more adjectives how should I arrange them?
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Is there an adjective for “at the same level”?

Much like equidistant is a suitable adjective for “at the same distance”, is there an adjective for ”at the same level” or “at the same scale”? When talking about level or scale, you can imagine two ...
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Could you analyse parts of speech of “$100 is as high as I'll go” & “I'll go as high as $100”?

See this short conversation B: How much are you talking? A: $100 is as high as I'll go. / I'll go as high as $100 .... In the dictionary, go [intransitive]: to be willing to pay a certain ...
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“Personal Use Program” or “Personal-Use Program”?

Help me settle a discussion on this topic. Everywhere I look, within my company's internal documents as well as documents from other companies, a "personal use" program is not hyphenated. A colleague ...
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Word between rare and common

I'm searching for an adjective that is between rare and common - e.g. something that is everyday, or ordinary, or not remarkable. Can anyone help suggest some words I might try? Thank you,
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Is it grammatically correct to use ''Newly wedded'' versus ''Newly wed''?

I have a question. Is it grammatically correct to use ''Newly wedded'' versus ''Newly wed''? From what I know is that 'Newly'' is an adverb and you can't use it describe 'wedded' as an adjective. ...
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What’s an antonym for ‘an honest liar’?

‘Liar’ doesn’t have an antonym NOUN, and ‘honest’ doesn’t have an antonym ADJECTIVE. The best antonym I could find is ‘a cheating honesty’. Is this correct?
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A word for a professor teaching in multiple universities

I have this feeling that I've seen and then forgotten a word which specifically describes a professor / lecturer who teaches in multiple universities. (Not just a visiting professor) "I hear Mallory ...
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Can “prior” be synonymous with “former” in this context?

Earlier this week someone I was talking to insisted that it's acceptable to use "prior" interchangeably with "former" in the context of "former vs. latter," i.e. to mean the first item of two things ...
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How is the suffix “-some” used after adjectives?

I want to understand how the word some is used after adjectives. Example: That's a cruel story. That's a cruelsome story. I believe both of these sentences have the same meaning but how does ...
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I need a word like “confound,” or “confuse” but with an important nuance

The word needs to mean confound or confuse, but with ignorance on the part of the confused that they are indeed, confused. We as spectators can tell they are coming to wrong conclusions based on ...
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Is there a list of all adjectives and adverbs in the English language?

I am working on a project to identify and remove the adjectives and adverbs in a document to determine if it is an opinion or a report of the facts. I understand the challenges: in determining if a ...
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Brave or bravely?

I am translating a text from English to my own language. This is the context, my question is about the sentence in bold. My question is about the interpretation of a word. If we did not find ...
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1answer
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How to tell which word a prepositional phrase is modifying?

Often it is obvious what word is being modified by a prepositional phrase, but sometimes it isn't. When it's not immediately clear, I often ask myself questions like: Does this phrase answer "where ...
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two different kinds of adjectives?

There seem to be two different kinds of adjectives, those that are used as prefixes and those that are used as predicates. Is there a name or terminology for this difference? For example, The dogs ...
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What's an adjective for “financially motivated”? [closed]

I need an adjective for the term "financially motivated." The word I'm looking for isn't exactly greedy or rapacious. Although it can have connotations like that, the word needs to directly mean ...
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Is there an adjective for someone who looks like a vampire? [closed]

I'm describing what an opiate addict looks like before recovery. Instead of saying "he looked like a vampire," I'd like to say something like "he looked [vampiric]." I actually just found out ...
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Commas in list of adjectives of math words

I have the following: Let C be a closed, bounded, convex, nonempty set. Let C be a closed bounded convex nonempty set. Let C be a closed, bounded, convex, and nonempty set. Let C be a closed, ...
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What kind of adjective is long?

I have been wondering what type of adjective long is, quantity or quality?
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Why is the position of reduced adjective clauses inconsistent? E.g. “the broken window” vs. “the man responsible”

The rule is that if the adjective clause has only a single adjective, we should replace it before the noun e.g.: "the window that is broken was fixed by Tom" is reduced to "the broken window was fixed ...
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I’m looking for an adjective that describes a person in my experience that at the time I would have obeyed without question or regard [closed]

A general in war or later after developing a relationship of leadership for whom one would obey instantly and without question or reference to one’s personal feelings of discomfort related to safety ...
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Is it correct to end a sentence listing various things with just “and similar” and nothing more after?

Take the example sentence: Our offering includes widgets, gadgets, gizmos, and similar. Would this be a correct way of ending that sentence, or do we need to add something more like: Our ...
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Is there an adjective for “double standard”

"double standard" is a noun-phrase that means a set of principles that applies differently and usually more rigorously to one group of people or circumstances than to another ... I see an ...
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Can a PP be analysed as a complex adjective?

In the sentence They are more familiar with this, the predicative complement more familiar with this is an AdjP, with the adjective head familiar. But what about a sentence such as They are more at ...
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Adjective for something that can continue to grow versus being terminal

I am looking for a single word that can describe something that is continuing to grow. The only term that comes to mind is viral but I am looking for something different. For an example, an ...
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10 Year Challenge

The hashtag 10yearchallenge is very trendy now, but the use of the compond adjective (10-year) makes it look like it's a challenge that spanned 10 years, however, it's the name of the challenge not an ...
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Good morning beautiful

For quite some time I have greeted foreign/english girlfriends with "good morning, beautiful" in the morning - I'm from Germany, so English is not my first language, hence the question: Today I ...
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What's a word for the contents of a book are different and more helpful than the cover depicts

The book's cover is "People Can't Drive You Crazy If You Don't Give Them The Keys" but the content of the book is more about changing yourself and your perceptions and attitude and more. TOC snapshot, ...
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Which is correct here, “your” or “yours”? [closed]

You and she have finished {your/yours} work?
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Why not “alkaline metal” rather than “alkali metal”? cf. “alkaline earth metal”

The word "alkaline" is described as the adjectival form of the noun "alkali". For example, Group 2 in the Periodic Table is named "alkaline earth metal". But then why is Group 1 named "alkali metal" ...
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Why do we say “acid rain” and not “acidic rain”?

The term "acid rain" refers to rainwater that are more acidic than regular rainwater. So if acidity is a property of the water, why do we say 'acid' and not 'acidic'?
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Adjective to something that can be redone [closed]

What adjective could I use to refer to something that can be redone. i.e: for something that can be removed, it would be 'removable', so what would fit to something that can be redone?
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The origin of the terms ' Attributive and Predicative Adjectives'

At present l am reviewing classification of adjectives: attributives and predicatives. I want to know who coined them, and when grammarians began using them. By the way, l have searched in vain for ...
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…be very loved!

I am just wondering why the following construction would not be acceptable for a lot of speakers of the English language: Fiona was very loved among her classmates. Also, I am wondering if the ...
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2answers
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Adjective for “being made mandatory” [closed]

I'm looking for a word like "mandatorised" (except it should be a real word) to describe something that's been transitioned from optional to mandatory. Edit: We're using this word to name a class in ...
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2answers
70 views

Word for 'landscape covered in green' [closed]

I am looking for a word to describe a natural landscape covered in natural green (trees etc). Like looking at a massive forest viewed from above. Two rivers forked in a _______ landscape/scenery ...
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1answer
76 views

Is there a term that describes an always-newbie person?

I'm trying to find a term which describes a person that, although he/she is constantly learning through life, is aware of his/her own ignorance the more the person knows. Does it exist? Example ...
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Opposite of “granular”

What is the opposite of "granular" in the following usage? granularity The level of detail considered in a model or decision making process. The greater the granularity, the deeper the ...
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Is there a term for a person who loves to adventure but thrives in routine?

Is there a word or term or phrase (in any language) that describes a person who has a lot of grand ideas for their life but doesn't actually do any of them? Something like a daydreamer, or a dreamer, ...
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When two adjectives need two different indefinite articles

What do you do when two adjectives require different indefinite articles? Is this sentence correct: "Here is an easy and fun way to accomplish the task." Normally, "fun" would take the article "a" ...