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Questions tagged [adjectives]

Adjectives are just one of several different types of noun modifiers, typically used to premodify or describe a noun. Do not confuse adjectives with nouns used attributively to modify other nouns. Adjectives have comparative and superlative degrees, can be used as predicate adjectives in copulae, and can themselves by modified by intensifiers and adverbs but not by other adjectives. Nouns in attribution fail all those tests.

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What's a word for the contents of a book are different and more helpful than the cover depicts

The book's cover is "People Can't Drive You Crazy If You Don't Give Them The Keys" but the content of the book is more about changing yourself and your perceptions and attitude and more. TOC snapshot, ...
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23 views

Usage of the word loquacious [on hold]

Can the word "loquacious" be used to describe excessive writing as well as talking, in the same way that I can use the word "verbose" or can it only be applied to verbal communication? Thank you in ...
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43 views

Which is correct here, “your” or “yours”? [on hold]

You and she have finished {your/yours} work?
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Why not “alkaline metal” rather than “alkali metal”? cf. “alkaline earth metal”

The word "alkaline" is described as the adjectival form of the noun "alkali". For example, Group 2 in the Periodic Table is named "alkaline earth metal". But then why is Group 1 named "alkali metal" ...
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Are these adjectives coordinate or cumulative [migrated]

I'm designing a board game and I've run into an issue regarding a string of adjectives that come up frequently in the game. Sadly, I'm a non-native speaker, so I thought it best to reach out and be ...
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Why do we say “acid rain” and not “acidic rain”?

The term "acid rain" refers to rainwater that are more acidic than regular rainwater. So if acidity is a property of the water, why do we say 'acid' and not 'acidic'?
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single word request for “someone who tries to please others” [closed]

i need an adjective for someone who fears to be juged so much he hides his true identity to please everyone else. please and thank you!
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Articles before nouns described by adjectives [on hold]

I'm not sure if I should use an article when describing a particular place with an adjective, like: a tram at the modern "qwerty" tram stop doesn't sound natural. I could say just a tram at the ...
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Adjective to something that can be redone [closed]

What adjective could I use to refer to something that can be redone. i.e: for something that can be removed, it would be 'removable', so what would fit to something that can be redone?
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The origin of the terms ' Attributive and Predicative Adjectives'

At present l am reviewing classification of adjectives: attributives and predicatives. I want to know who coined them, and when grammarians began using them. By the way, l have searched in vain for ...
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English ( United states) [closed]

I'm looking for an adjective that describes a person who never gives present? Help me out😅
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The lion is the king of the jungle. - is 'king if the jungle' an adjective? [closed]

Also if i say he is a man us man an adjective and why? Thanks in advance
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Culture aspects vs Cultural aspects

Hello I wanted to say that I read this book because it has cultural aspects Then, I got confused when to use “culture aspects” and “cultural aspects” Thanks in advance
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…be very loved!

I am just wondering why the following construction would not be acceptable for a lot of speakers of the English language: Fiona was very loved among her classmates. Also, I am wondering if the ...
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2answers
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Adjective for “being made mandatory” [closed]

I'm looking for a word like "mandatorised" (except it should be a real word) to describe something that's been transitioned from optional to mandatory. Edit: We're using this word to name a class in ...
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2answers
59 views

Word for 'landscape covered in green' [closed]

I am looking for a word to describe a natural landscape covered in natural green (trees etc). Like looking at a massive forest viewed from above. Two rivers forked in a _______ landscape/scenery ...
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1answer
74 views

Is there a term that describes an always-newbie person?

I'm trying to find a term which describes a person that, although he/she is constantly learning through life, is aware of his/her own ignorance the more the person knows. Does it exist? Example ...
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3answers
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Opposite of “granular”

What is the opposite of "granular" in the following usage? granularity The level of detail considered in a model or decision making process. The greater the granularity, the deeper the ...
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Is there a term for a person who loves to adventure but thrives in routine?

Is there a word or term or phrase (in any language) that describes a person who has a lot of grand ideas for their life but doesn't actually do any of them? Something like a daydreamer, or a dreamer, ...
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1answer
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When two adjectives need two different indefinite articles

What do you do when two adjectives require different indefinite articles? Is this sentence correct: "Here is an easy and fun way to accomplish the task." Normally, "fun" would take the article "a" ...
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1answer
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The order of adjectives: opinion and length

I have studied in most grammar books that adjectives that express opinion, such as wonderful, attractive and lovely come before other descriptive adjectives. But in the following construction, you ...
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5answers
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What is an adjective to describe something that burns at a hot temperature?

I am looking for a phrase or a single word that describes something that burns at a high temperature, like in this sentence: His temper was volatile and {hot-burning}, like acetone. "Hot-burning" ...
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1answer
27 views

Do we hyphenate adjectives including numbers?

What is the correct way of saying this: I have completed three years of a six years course. I have completed three years of a six-years course? And also, should it be 'six year' or 'six ...
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Can I say brute-forceable?

I was thinking about using the word brute-forceable to describe something that is able to be brute-forced. I know that brute-force is a verb, and that certain verbs, such as bear or break can be ...
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What is the comparative degree of the word “last”

please help me in this regard, I have searched a lot on Google but did not able to find the answer. Your help will be highly appreciated.
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What is the type of an adjective “fed up”

Recently, I stumbled upon a phrase "fed up" in one sentence. On the first glance, I was thinking it should be a phrasal verb but it didn't correlate with the sentence meaning. I found out that it is ...
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Adjective and conjunction which has higher priority?

I have a question about priority. For example: "elder brother and sister" means: "elder (brother and sister)" or "(elder brother) and sister"? Another example: "old men and women" means: "old (...
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38 views

Can we use 'inquisitive questions'?

Inquisitive means curious or questioning. So would using 'inquisitive' as an adjective for questions be redundant?
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41 views

Levels of an object's luminosity

Is there a concise list somewhere of terms used to describe a range of "brightness" or "luminosity"? Say from dim to blinding as an example. I tried Googling it and searching Wikipedia, but all I got ...
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due to vs because of

I know the 'due to vs because of' issue has been tackled here before, but I hope anybody can help me with this specific issue: Should it be: 'The tournament was cancelled due to disappointing ...
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Which adjective is correct here? “He is the oldest/eldest child.” [duplicate]

Which word is correct in the sentence: He is the oldest (or the eldest) child in the family. If I am not mistaken the word "eldest" goes with the noun. I would use it here.
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4answers
111 views

What is a single-word adjective for relating /pertaining to physical addictiveness?

I need an adjective which means roughly 'of a tendency to cause physical dependence' that can be applied to drugs. 'Addictive' or the like won't work because it doesn't distinguish between physical ...
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1answer
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“Incumbent” as “current”. Usage and its etymology

Empirical research on neighborhood change, however, has produced no conclusive evidence that incumbent residents are in fact displaced under circumstances of gentrification. (source) This is ...
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How is this structure formed? A case of 'inverted adjective'?

Here are the structures in question: Is there a region in the United States of America that has a pronunciation similar, .... Tuscany)? compare with: ... that has a similar pronunciation, .......
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Never pre-positive adjectives and intransitive prepositions

The accepted response to an earlier question concerning words like alone, asleep and alive places such words in the category of adjectives that simply don't occur in front of the nouns or noun phrases ...
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Comparative or superlative adjective?

I think it is best not to be impolite. Is the above sentence fine, or should it have better instead of best in it?
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is ‘fine’ in the sense ‘of very good quality’ gradable? [closed]

Fine in the sense of very good quality seems to be an absolute adjective, and since absolute adjectives are not gradable, so I am wondering if this principle applies to fine in the sense ‘of very good ...
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Adjective or verb

Is: The girl looked angrily to us Or The girl looked angry to us Which one is true? I think say that the second one to me is true but i have been told that the first one is true Thanks for the help
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Can “darling” be used as an adjective in the sentence “You look so darling”? [closed]

I've never heard of the word "darling" being used this way until yesterday, and a discussion came up about whether this would be correct use or not. Edit: Some additional info I wrote in reply to an ...
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Can the word “backhanded” be easily misunderstood by a young kid?

In a recent question at Spanish Language it has been asked about the translation of "backhanded" into Spanish as "treacherous". I answered that that is an adaptation more than a translation because of ...
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When did “awkwarde” mean “backhanded”?

In an old tale about Robin Hood and Guy of Gisborne this can be read: Robin thought on Our Lady deere, And soone leapt vp againe, And thus he came with an awkwarde stroke; Good Sir Guy hee ...
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Proper way to adjectivize the word “deity”

Having looked it up, no dictionary I can find lists a definition for "deitous," so I was wondering if perhaps I added the the wrong suffix to "deity" to turn it into adjective? This is more of a ...
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Why isn't the definite article used before “closest” in “Who are you closest to”?

Why is there no definite article before "closest" in the question "Who are you closest to in your family?" My only assumption is that "to be close to someone" is a set phrase and it is used without an ...
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1answer
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suspicious, suspectful, or suspected [closed]

I want some example sentences with each of the words (used as adjectives) to better understand how I can use them! The sentence I want to write is: The actual culprit is portrayed as a well-...
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2answers
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Does the adjective 'ridiculous' always mean something bad?

I have heard this word a lot in British English and I'm wondering if it can be used to describe good situations. Thanks in advance,
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“More Bored” Vs “Boreder”

I have a question about comparative adjectives. I read that if an adjective has only one syllable we write its comparative form as: adjective + er, e.g. bigger and if an adjective has more than two ...
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Word-initial or -initially?

Quoting from OUP blog (+): As noted above, sure and sugar are such conspicuous monsters because word initially su– designates sh only in those two words. According to oxforddictionaries.com ...
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A word/phrase for something that does not do justice to something?

This system of evaluation is not doing justice to the employees' work. Those who are good are getting fewer scores, and those who are not good are getting higher scores. The system does not reveal ...
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Can “like-this” be considered as an adjective? [closed]

I'm just asking whether "like-this" can be considered as an adjective ? example : we don’t see like-this opportunities all the time is this correct, if not, why ? and what to say instead ? and ...
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What happened to the adjectival forms of Belize and Singapore in their currencies?

It's been researched that every country has their adjectival form (exception is a demonym, which denotes nouns), such as the adjectival form of Mexico is Mexican, the adjectival form of Russia is ...