Questions tagged [adjectives]

Adjectives are just one of several different types of noun modifiers, typically used to premodify or describe a noun. Do not confuse adjectives with nouns used attributively to modify other nouns. Adjectives have comparative and superlative degrees, can be used as predicate adjectives in copulae, and can themselves be modified by intensifiers and adverbs but not by other adjectives. Nouns in attribution fail all those tests.

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Is "before" also an adjective?

I searched "define before" in Google and found out "before" is not listed as an adjective in most dictionaries. Google's built-in dictionary, which is one of the Oxford ...
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“Upset”: different stress pattern for attributive and predicative use

Today I came across an English adjective which has one stress pattern when used predicatively: her cat died: she's very up‵set, and the other when used attributively: he won't be coming: he has an ‵...
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What is the meaning of "pale and cold"? noun or adjective? [closed]

...Soon the sharpened features, and sunken eye, and fallen jaw, pale and cold, bearing the manifest impress of death's signet, began to glow with returning animation.... The source: Leith in the time ...
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The differences between the word "contradictory" and "ambivalent"? [closed]

Correct me if wrong, I think both of the words are adjectives describing having two opposite characteristics at the same time. To my understanding, while ambivalent is more of a psychological term or ...
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One-syllable word/adjective for 'receives little attention' [closed]

I want to find a one-syllable adjective that means 'receives little attention' / 'receives less attention'. For example, the sentence 'Paralympics usually receives less attention than the Olympics.' ...
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Can "due" meaning "owed" be used without "to" in AmE? e.g. "the recognition which was due her"

Encountered the following in a text I'm proofreading. ...tries to salvage the dignity due the situation My instinct is to correct this to ...tries to salvage the dignity due to the situation but ...
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Gerunds or adjective clauses [migrated]

Can someone explain this to me? I am confused by these gerund or adjective clauses. Lionel messi attending the party. Dolphins jumping at marineland in California. Mafia selling drugs. Bertrand ...
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Adjective for the Weather [duplicate]

I'm looking for a word which functions as an adjective for weather. So I want to say something like "He had weather concerns as he went on holiday", but with a specific adjective term in ...
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What is the adjective for “drama queen” as in a person/place overreacting to a minor action based on petty/unnecessary rules?

I'm looking for an adjective that can express the meaning of “drama queen”, but I’m not limited to that option. drama queen n. Informal. a person who often has exaggerated or overly emotional ...
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Adjective similar to "in-depth" or "slow-paced"

I need to know whether there's an adjective that could work in this sentence: I will provide ___ help so you can solve problems independently. I hope that the answer could be similar to "in-...
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What is the best adjective to describe when a flag is flying perpendicularly like in this image?

It is Flag Day, and the US flag is on my brain. I can think of erect, unfurled, and at attention to describe a flag flying perpendicularly to the ground in a strong wind, but I feel like I’ve heard ...
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Time series: hyphenated or not?

I am facing a consistency issue when proofreading a paper regarding the use of the term 'time series'. When used as a standalone noun, it seems to be written as 'time series', with the two words being ...
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Usage of the word "ineffective"

Is it possible to use the word “ineffective” referring to people as is written in the following sentence? (Many thanks for the primary responses to this question, particularly MarcInManhattan. I ...
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Does it make sense to use 'untenable' in this context?'

I'm writing about a character who is facing an arranged marriage. Does it make sense to say that, in a situation such as this, developing feelings for someone else is 'untenable'? Are there any other ...
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What is the term for phrases that are compound adjectives, similar to "come-hither look", "high-school-teaching voice"? [duplicate]

I know the etymology, and although it's listed as a noun, merriam-webster tells me the definition, but I want to know the name of this sort of adjective. Wiktionary has it grouped as English ...
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Ambiguity between present participle, ing-adjectives, and gerund

"It is exciting." Is context the only way to classify exciting in one of these grammatical terms (present participle, ing-adjectives, and gerund)?
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[noun]+of+[noun] vs. [noun]+[noun] [duplicate]

What's the difference between these two structures? For example, take a look at this sentence: "The flow of fuel in an old machine like mine is regulated by a carburetor, which draws fuel into ...
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Specialized or Specialist [closed]

There is a large hospital in my city whose name is King Fahd Specialist Hospital. I argued with a doctor working there about the name of the hospital. I said that it needs to be changed into King Fahd ...
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Is it correct to place the adjective before 'is/was'?

For example: "Shut were his blinds." vs "His blinds were shut." Is there any meaningful difference between these two? Is the former even grammatically correct?
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Is using "complete" as a gradable adjective ok in some situations?

So in writing, I want to express various degrees of completion. Originally, I used "in a more complete implementation". A reviewer remarked that this was wrong, as complete is not gradable. ...
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Benfica badge or Benfica's badge [duplicate]

Should I say: I kissed Benfica badge or I kissed Benfica's badge. How are football teams' names used as adjectives?
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What could possibly cause the stress shift in adverbs ending in -arily compared to adjectives ending in -ary?

While adjectives ending in -ary (British English /əri/, American English /eri/) never have stress on the second last syllable (the /e/ in AmE, and obviously the /ə/ in BrE), their derivative adverbs ...
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What is the difference between these adjectives: Ketoic vs. Ketotic

From Wikitonary Ketoic: Relating to ketosis or ketoacidosis Ketotic: Of, pertaining to, or afflicted with ketosis So, do you think these adjectives are synonymous, with ketotic being reserved to ...
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Are "close" and "open" verbs or adjectives? [closed]

I'm really hard stuck trying to comprehend whether these two words simultaneously have two natures. I read: The door is open The door is opened Difference? The door is close The door is closed ...
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Possible to tell the difference between the comparative adjective and the adverbial phrase here?

This sentence is from an interview I am proofreading: I sometimes believe that a person outside of me can see my aesthetic easier than I can see my own. My first instinct was of course to suggest ...
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Comparative Adjective vs Noun; cleaner vs cleaner [duplicate]

I am curious if there is any reason that English converged to using similar suffix for both comparative adjective, and for noun. For example, as shown in the title, "cleaner" could mean both ...
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An informal term used for someone who has an affinity for American culture?

I came across the term in an online article, and it wasn't "Americanophile" : a person who greatly admires or favors America or things from American culture Merriam-Webster online Is ...
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"X is less effective than y in treating the disease" or "X is less effective in treating the disease than y"?

Should it be, "PT with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)is less effective than CT in treating anxiety" or, "PT with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is less ...
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Attributive nouns in science [duplicate]

I see more and more articles in scientific journals, where attributive nouns use plural. To me they sound really strange and non-intuitive. 'materials science' 'materials design' To me they should be '...
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Is "rid" a noun in "I want rid of him"?

The Oxford Dictionary regards rid as a verb only. However, is rid a noun in I want rid of him? If rid is a past participle, then, can it be followed by want?
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adjective - role

The boy felt guilty because he knew what he had done. in this sentence the word guilty being an adjective is modifying the verb felt. Please update if my understanding is correct
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Audio version of "Vision"

If 'vision' is the detection of visual information, is there another similar word for the detection of audio..? Obviously 'hearing', although that just doesn't seem appropriate. 'Auditory sensation' ...
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What are adjectives for "a group that grows fast", and "a group that is comparatively static"?

The context is: I have an app where there are entries, sorted in tables. Think "Employees" and "Sales": The "Employees" table is mostly static. It might go up or down a ...
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Is the word "lured" an adjective or verb in the sentence "I feel lured by the chance to start over again." [closed]

While I understand the verb "feel" is often followed by -ed adjectives when talking about emotional states, "lured" itself is not an adjective. So I am not sure what to make of the ...
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Can Idea + s after Endless (adj.)? [closed]

Can Idea + s come after endless (adj.)? = Endless Ideas? Is that correct? Because I wonder endless should be uncountable.
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Should there be a comma between a noun and its adjective? [closed]

Can "A white paper" be written as "A paper, white"? Can "The nine planets" be written as "The planets, nine"?
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What word could I use to describe singular defects of a surface?

My master's thesis topic is about automatically detecting defects on wood surfaces. Whereas most research in the field is concerned about "regular" defects created by processes (such as ...
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What is the word for extra, unneeded descriptive words describing something in a sentence? [duplicate]

What’s the term for extra, synonymous unneeded adjectives describing a noun or verb in a sentence?
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Is there a word to describe a person who is so interested in the detail of everything? Especially a word with a positive meaning [duplicate]

I am wondering if there is a word to describe a person who is so enthusiastic about the details of a particular subject. I know the word geek. But I am wondering if there are more words to describe a ...
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Does "300-odd pages" mean "about 300 pages" or "somewhat more than 300 pages"?

I've always understood the adjective -odd used in combination to mean about, as in "She read 300-odd pages and then stopped." After reading a comment by Edwin Ashworth in another question (&...
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The word "ornamental" : is it an opinion adjective, a purpose adjective, or part of a compound noun here?

Upon reviewing my notes on the order of adjectives, I saw that "ornamental" was listed as an opinion adjective. However, wouldn't ornamental be a "purpose" or "type" ...
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Using the definite article before adjectives [closed]

It is usual to use the definite article "the" before an adjective referring to a certain group of people. My question is: can we rewrite the following sentence without "the"? The ...
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Why is "brick" in "a brick house" a noun, whereas "plastic" in "a plastic bucket" is an adjective?

Taking these classifications from Oxford's Lexico: plastic brick
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Do l need a comma in this sentence?

To me, the following sentence is fine. But my colleague insists that l use a comma after the word "ancient". Archeologists discovered a unique, long, broken, ancient (?) Egyptian bronze ...
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Can I say "the US people"?

Is it fine to describe people of the USA as "US people"? For instance: "the US people display different cultures and traditions." What I want to ask is that can I use the word &...
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A word for creepiness without reason? [duplicate]

What would be one word for a deep-rooted, unsettling fear at a creepy place without any particular reason, just an unfounded, instinctive and unnatural feeling that something is not right, something ...
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A word for a feeling of instinctive and unfounded fear to the observer has no foresight into? [duplicate]

What would be one word for a deep-rooted, unsettling fear at a creepy place without any particular reason, just an unfounded, instinctive and unnatural feeling that something is not right, something ...
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Is it redundant to say something "must be necessarily..."?

Is the combined use of must be and necessarily here redundant? Your appearance must be necessarily maintained. I want this statement to be sardonic, so simply "Your appearance must be ...
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Why does English use the adjective structure "noun-doing" instead of "doing-noun"?

A similar question is Using the structure "noun-adjective" as a noun (e.g. "innovation-inclined"). The structure "noun-done" ("innovation-inclined") makes sense ...
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A recently acquired object vs a recently-acquired object [duplicate]

If someone recently acquired a certain artwork, would it therefore be correct to refer to it as their "most recently-acquired artwork"?
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