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Questions tagged [adjectives]

Adjectives are just one of several different types of noun modifiers, typically used to premodify or describe a noun. Do not confuse adjectives with nouns used attributively to modify other nouns. Adjectives have comparative and superlative degrees, can be used as predicate adjectives in copulae, and can themselves be modified by intensifiers and adverbs but not by other adjectives. Nouns in attribution fail all those tests.

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An adjective for something peaceful but sad?

I need an adjective for that please, is about the energy of the room feeling both sad but quiet and peaceful. There was a ____ atmosphere in the room.
Lara A.L. Martins's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
72 views

"The tired fireman found the building ablaze", is "ablaze" predicative adjective at there? [duplicate]

I have encountered a question which asks which sentence doesn't include a predicative adjective and according to the question this sentence includes a predicative adjective, The tired fireman found ...
Zehir's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
46 views

Which phrase is being modified in the given sentence?

What is the phrase 'payable in foreign currency' modifying in the following sentence?: The borrowing cost ceiling includes spread over relevant benchmark rate, loan related insurance premium and ...
Usman Ali's user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
71 views

In need of the word or phrase describing studying or educating in a non-formal way or as a hobby

So when I was 14 years old I started an interest in psychology. I've been studying it (legitimate medical research articles, textbooks, clinical guides, etc vs googling) for almost 13 years at this ...
Maddie Kiley's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
58 views

Meaning of joined in marriage [closed]

“I joined in marriage Ben and Nicole”… when the officiant write it in the marriage certificate can it have a double meanings? The first meaning is- I united in marriage Ben and Nicole- meaning I ...
Karen Lisbon's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
133 views

Past participle or adjective?

John is highly educated. John was educated in London. According to traditional grammar, educated is an adjective in the first sentence and a verb in the second sentence (past participle). But ...
Jvlnarasimharao's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
34 views

Using the terms gesture, gestural and gesturality

I am trying to understand the difference between, and I'm not sure how to describe it, something like: agree, agreeable and agreeability; approach, approachable and approachability etc...I'm ...
Ch Mait's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
85 views

Why is the adjectival order "noble eightfold path" on the one hand yet "octadic patrician way" on the other?

I'm a native English speaker. As I understand, English grammar rules specify a particular ordering of types of adjectives. In Buddhism, there is a "noble eightfold path". That is, a path, ...
Claudiu's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
54 views

Stacked adjectives? [duplicate]

If I say adjectives in a row, where the first could apply to the second, such as "cute blonde girl" - does it imply that I think blonde is cute? If it doesn't, why not and how would this be ...
G_A_R_T's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
31 views

Adjectives derived from proper nouns are not always capitalized [duplicate]

I have had a hard time teaching the rule that proper adjectives are capitalized on the Continent (one student even proudly declaimed that proper adjectives just don't exist in England). I taught this ...
LMR's user avatar
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8 votes
8 answers
5k views

A word for something that is, "Bizarre" but, "Beautiful"

Is there a word that describes something that is weird, strange, odd, bizarre, etc. but also beautiful, wonderful, amazing, fantastic, etc.? Example: a word to describe a place that is strangely ...
Cashier-Man's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
63 views

Greatest extent possible vs Greatest possible extent [adjective position]

I know the following sentences basically mean the same thing: We need to reduce pollution to the greatest extent possible. We need to reduce pollution to the greatest possible extent. so my ...
mateleco's user avatar
  • 145
0 votes
2 answers
109 views

What is the passive voice of sentence "When I met you." [closed]

The sentence when did I meet you? Is an interrogative sentence, Its voice would be: when were you met by me? But the given sentence is When I met you. This is not an interrogative sentence. This ...
Jatin 's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
823 views

If ‘provincial’ is the adjective for provinces what is the adjective form of ‘dominions’?

I have two category of territories: Provinces and Dominions. Adjective for everything from provinces is provincial. Like Provincial Government, Provincial Roads, Provincial Courts etc. What is a ...
EMS's user avatar
  • 329
2 votes
2 answers
84 views

Indirect Question Formation with Be

If we look at these direction questions changed into indirect (or more polite) questions: Where is the bathroom? Do you know where the bathroom is? How tall are you? Could you tell me how tall you ...
Lab coat's user avatar
  • 131
1 vote
0 answers
62 views

Adjective about eyes

I'm trying to understand a passage from White Light Nights by O. O. McIntyre : Here an old woman, with chrome-colored face and the enduring eyes of the beaten. What does 'enduring eyes' really mean? ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
46 views

What preposition should I use with "proficuous"?

Proficuous: useful or profitable. But how to use? Cash proved proficuous for/in/at securing the deal.
Ray Woodcock's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
65 views

How to identify adverbs or adjectives correctly in a sentence? [closed]

Everything is explained in the above sentence. Everything is explained in the sentence above. i)which part of speech is "above" in the first sentence? ii)which part of speech is "above&...
Md Anik's user avatar
6 votes
11 answers
3k views

Ways to Say "Forcibly Inducted"

As a combatant, your family's safety is threatened by your captors. "Return to your platoon as a spy for us, and your family's lives will be spared." You accept the terms with steadfast ...
Vepuei's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
63 views

Why does the sequence of some types of adjectives differ?

I was reading a book, and a character calls another character "a gangly, little human". Now, if I were to use another adjective instead of little, say, tiny, I would have to say "a tiny,...
Anushka Kulkarni's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
73 views

Would the Persian equivalent of Anglo/Franco/Russo… be Persico? (from the Latin Persicus) Can I write “Persico-Egyptian”

In my paper I am talking about something which refers to both Egypt and Persia, so to make it short I first thought it should be “Perso-Egyptian” but sometimes it's not as simply as that, like “Luso” ...
Vincent Desrosiers's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
16 views

Debt collection software or debt collections software? [duplicate]

I've found several discussions about the general use of "collection" vs "collections" but not in the context of debt collection, specifically. I'm currently editing a series of ...
spacegarlic's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
62 views

Infinitive phrases modifying adjectives [duplicate]

I'm having a hard time trying to figure out how these infinitive phrases function (if they are infinitive phrases at all) in the following examples. I have learnt that they can act as nouns, ...
fonema Jimena's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
95 views

What is an adjective for a person who is attractive but doesn't like taking care of their appearance?

Like an attractive person but who doesn't wear make up, doesn't comb, and doesn't try to combine his clothes. Attractive in an edgy way, not caring about their look but still looking good. Being ...
Claire Perez's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
60 views

What s, if any, the type of noun modifier for the receiver of a verb

I'm looking to find what it is called when a noun is modified by a prefix/suffix to mean that it is someone who receives x. And also, if there are examples of it in languages that are simple. The best ...
Durakken's user avatar
  • 121
1 vote
0 answers
56 views

Word for the final instance of awarding a perpetual trophy

We have a perpetual trophy that has been awarded for almost four decades. The Award is being retired, and presented to a worthy recipient one last time. How do I refer to this instance of the awarding?...
Jess's user avatar
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0 votes
4 answers
83 views

How to use the word alive as an adjective in a sentence? [closed]

Example: She returned from spiritual retreat "vividly" (OR FULL OF LIFE) Is alive a postpositive adjective? If I want to say: She returned from spiritual retreat "ALIVELY" (...
Castro G's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
61 views

How do you interpret 'high risk eggs' in this context? [closed]

I was watching a documentary about border control at an airport. One woman was carrying prohibited foods. The relevant part of the original sentence is as follows: This woman ... has been caught with ...
SuperDuperMario's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
66 views

Why is 'a' used between smooth and gloss? [duplicate]

I am reading a book (A Promised Land) and there is a sentence that I don't understand: I still like writing things out in longhand, finding that a computer gives even my roughest drafts too smooth a ...
merrona's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
344 views

What do you call an elementary, middle and high schools sharing the same space?

I used to go to a school where the primary (elementary) and secondary (middle+high) schools both share the same area. So basically as a secondary schooler, I could walk to the primary side without ...
Amerul Atiq's user avatar
7 votes
10 answers
3k views

Adjective meaning "once, and eventually to be again"

I am currently on a leave of absence from my PhD. I would like to describe myself as an "[adjective] grad student", where [adjective] means something like "once, and destined to be ...
Max's user avatar
  • 171
2 votes
2 answers
343 views

Does the part of speech of "said" differ between dialects?

Note: This is similar to, but not a duplicate of, an old question on Linguistics SE. Consider these two sentences: One employee accused him of serious crimes, but said employee did not provide any ...
alphabet's user avatar
  • 19.1k
0 votes
1 answer
70 views

What is a single word that describes a person who has a small amount of authority and exercises it heavy handedly with great self importance? [duplicate]

For example, a supermarket cashier who strictly regulates customers’ compliance with their rules for proper check-out protocol, such as use of the order divider bar.
user495163's user avatar
4 votes
4 answers
1k views

Why doesn't "The Screwtape Letters" have the Saxon genitive in its title?

I was recently asked a question regarding the book "The Screwtape Letters" by C.S. Lewis, and I am not sure about the answer. The title of the novel does not contain the Saxon genitive "...
andreasagninese's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
168 views

Is there a term like "antonym" but for words of opposite sentiment?

I like to play a game where I take a descriptive word with an emotional bias (i.e. describing something "good" or "bad") and I try to think of a word with roughly the same meaning ...
Zekko's user avatar
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-1 votes
4 answers
234 views

What words describe the feeling of proving someone wrong?

I am looking for words to describe the feeling of when you prove someone wrong. For example Person A says person B can't do something. Out of spite Person B does said thing. Person B then feels____. ...
FarAwayCookie's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
103 views

Does "happy" function as a predicate adjective in "He seems to be happy"?

He seems happy. He seems to be happy. In the first sentence, "happy" is the predicate adjective. What is going on in the second sentence? Does the infinitive with "happy" still ...
cookie234's user avatar
  • 259
0 votes
1 answer
59 views

Is "hopscotch" also an adjective? [closed]

I've grown up using hopscotch as an adjective and I'm wondering if anyone else also has? For example, "Stop being hopscotch with the shoveling," or "Stop doing hopscotch work," ...
Rontron's user avatar
  • 109
-1 votes
1 answer
97 views

Is there an elegant way of refering to this scenario?

I simulated cometary activity in three different scenarios: local (confined to a certain region on the nucleus), global (encompassing the entire nucleus), and global except local. While it is simple ...
mapf's user avatar
  • 119
1 vote
1 answer
44 views

Adjective for "being added an ellipsis"

This is a related question to Adjective for "containing an ellipsis" with a distinction for the act of becoming, instead of the state of being. The provided answer suggests elliptic: ...
Konrad Viltersten's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
34 views

How would you use commas to separate adjectives of equal rights? [duplicate]

I am very confused about these separate adjectives of equal rights. The example I got was The Colt's strong, swift defense enabled them to win.
Livizsmart4ELA's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
16 views

Continuous form of verb or Present participle? [duplicate]

Expanded version: Nobody likes to talk with the man who is sitting on the rock alone. Reduced version: Nobody likes to talk with the man sitting on the rock alone. How is it possible that in the ...
raj rajput's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
78 views

When do you use hyphens with compound adjectives?

I understand there are numerous questions related to this question but nothing truly clarifies my problem. I have been trying to understand when I should use hyphens in compound adjectives and I seem ...
Benji's user avatar
  • 21
0 votes
0 answers
35 views

A/an + adj. + weather [duplicate]

We can say, "I had a delicious breakfast" because of the adjective, as opposed to "I had breakfast", where we don't use an indefinite article. As in this former case we have ...
Leroy's user avatar
  • 294
0 votes
0 answers
22 views

Correct/correctly [duplicate]

Congratulations for spelling all your words correct. I would use “correctly” rather than “correct”. Can anyone explain why they use an adjective (correct) instead of an adverb (correctly) in this ...
Cristina's user avatar
-2 votes
2 answers
140 views

Is there an adjective for intensity/force ending in "-al"?

Is there an adjective of intensity (or similar term related to force) that ends in "-al"? like: space > spatial, time > temporal, etc. Intensity is meant as the physical attribute/...
Oliver Amundsen's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
95 views

Single word for "ignoring the fine details to only consider the big picture" as a counterpoint to "pedantic"?

Is there a single word to describe someone who disregards the fine details of something and only focuses on what they believe is the bigger picture? I'm looking for a pejorative connotation similar to ...
SketchMan3's user avatar
-2 votes
3 answers
125 views

There is a brand of ale in the United Kingdom called Farmers Ale, with no apostrophe on farmers. Is this correct? [duplicate]

There is a brand of ale called Farmers Ale. Should there be an apostrophe on farmers? Or is farmers acting as an adjective like "sports" cars?
entropy's user avatar
  • 97
0 votes
0 answers
138 views

Why do we use “more ADJECTIVE” and “less ADJECTIVE” with adjectives of more than one syllable? [duplicate]

I've asked this question in Quora and the answers I got were: First answer: Using "more" and "less" helps maintain clarity and consistency in comparative forms. It provides a ...
Stim Roe's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
60 views

Prepositional phrases next to adjectives

-The boy akin to an impassioned bard recited his stories -The girl similar to him stood still. These adjectives (italicized) and others similar are always placed next to a prepositional phrase (bolded)...
anu's user avatar
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