Questions tagged [adjectives]

Adjectives are just one of several different types of noun modifiers, typically used to premodify or describe a noun. Do not confuse adjectives with nouns used attributively to modify other nouns. Adjectives have comparative and superlative degrees, can be used as predicate adjectives in copulae, and can themselves by modified by intensifiers and adverbs but not by other adjectives. Nouns in attribution fail all those tests.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
1answer
17 views

Which of the following sentences are correct (possessive Adjective)?

I have some doubts regarding Possessive Case of Adjective. Q1. The price of your book is more than (mine/that of mine). Q2. The ideas of your friend are as beneficial as (hers/those of hers). Q3. The ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

Concise way of describing two mathematical variables being increased through differing ranges of values

I increase the value of two parameters in an equation through two (differing) ranges - with the second iterating through the entire range for each value of the first. i.e. If increase the values of ...
2
votes
1answer
19 views

question on adverbs (away, apart)

I wanted to ask a question about the adverbs away and apart. The villages are miles apart. The exam is only two weeks away. It is three days apart. It is five kilometers away/apart. Away and apart ...
1
vote
3answers
88 views

A word for someone who is out of touch

During a recent conversation with one of my friends, whom I had not been regularly speaking to, I asked her whether her sister had applied for a job as I knew she’d graduated some months ago. She told ...
1
vote
1answer
25 views

What this means: “that is very nuanced”

Does "very nuanced" mean "very different" in this sentence? We are marrying the two up in a way that is very nuanced.
0
votes
1answer
50 views

How to categorize the word “schwifty”

In one of the episodes in the TV-Show "Rick and Morty", Rick uses the word "schwifty" when he is singing. Obviously, this is just a made-up word. But my question is how is such a made-up word ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Why is it Endodontic (-ic suffix) but Dental (-al suffix)?

Especially when they both derive from Endodontist and Dentist respectively, so context doesn't vary much. I found many answers on the web explaining that -ic and -ical suffixes don't follow any rule ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Stupid and/or stupidly

As I understand the word 'stupid' is used as a noun, an adjective and as an adverb. However there is also the word 'stupidly' of which I think that's the proper adverb, but it is hardly used. Common ...
2
votes
1answer
36 views

comparative of the adjective “grave”

I had written The effect of traumatic experience may be graver if... and the editor has corrected it to The effect of traumatic experience may be more grave if... Surely grave conforms to ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

Passive voice using the preposition “with” instead of “by”

wiktionary.org offers Verb smite: 6. (figuratively, now only in passive) To strike with love or infatuation. Bob was smitten with Laura from the first time he saw her. I wonder whether ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

“difficult of accomplishment”

(=completion, fulfilment) "difficult of accomplishment". Is it grammatically correct? If so, is it a productive pattern? any other examples? I'd say "of difficult accomplishment" or else "difficult ...
1
vote
1answer
31 views

X vs. X-al adjectives (asymptotic vs asymptotical, etc.)

Right now I am writing a technical report, where I describe asymptotic(al) curves, expansions etc. My understanding after a bit of web browsing is that asymptotic and asymptotical are near-synonymous ...
1
vote
1answer
77 views

Mono is 1, Stereo is 2, what is 3?

Cellphone cameras have moved from a single lens to a dual lens arrangement in recent years and the next iPhone is rumored to have three. There's "Monoscopic" vision, "Stereoscopic" vision, but what's ...
1
vote
0answers
16 views

When to hyphenate adjectives that imply nouns [closed]

In the following sentence, Bill is my best friend and Alice is my second-best friend. I understand that the hyphen is required to make clear that Alice is less of a best friend than Bill. Without ...
1
vote
2answers
45 views

Stunned silence/disbelief [closed]

What meaning of "stunned" applies to the following sentences where stunned modifies abstract nouns forming an adverbial? what is the linguistic term for such a behavior? What other adjectives act in ...
-1
votes
1answer
59 views

Does the adjective “Arabian” refer to the people or to the location? [duplicate]

Arab and Arabian are both related to people: He is an Arab. He is an Arabian. Which is used for the location of a country? Egypt is an Arab country. Egypt is an Arabian country.
1
vote
3answers
72 views

What is the word or idiom for a person who pays attention to small and unimportant things?

We were reading a text in my English class and One of my students Lost the line. I pointed to the line we were reading and instead of following the text she said teacher you have beautiful nails. Now ...
0
votes
0answers
48 views

What is the name of this type of adjective?

Okay, I've been wondering this for a while. There's a specific type of adjective, and it seems to me that it should have a name, but I'm not sure if it does. It's the class of adjectives that can be ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

ED endings: Adjective or Past Participle in Perfect Tenses, Passive Voice and after To Be? [duplicate]

I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around this. In the passive voice, we could see sentences like these:    "The car is heated."    "His spirits are lifted."    ...
1
vote
8answers
56 views

Attribute to describe about doing something smartly with clear direction [closed]

When I research about wolves, I found that they have a very interesting attribute: they always do things (hunting, "trekking", caring...) with a well-planned & clear direction/strategy and do ...
2
votes
1answer
37 views

Most concise way to describe people of multiple nationalities, not family origins

A problem I'm having is finding a concise way to differentiate between when people are a citizen of one country but have family origins in another, and dual citizens. For example, is there an easy way ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

“Torpedo remote detonator” vs “remote torpedo detonator”?

This question is for game I am working on. I read about adjective order and I tried google something similar but still not sure which version is correct or is there any difference at all. Thanks!
0
votes
2answers
32 views

Is there a word that describes someone with a light footprint? [duplicate]

I need a word to describe someone who lives a happy, purposeful life without needing a lot of resources. The words "light footprint" and "low maintenance" come to mind, but I'd like a word/adjectival ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

an adjective after a noun [duplicate]

I have faced the following sentence: "The work leverages features unique to a particular platform." As far as I know an adjective is used before a noun but how can we say "features unique"? I think ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Can the word “stale” be used on data or information? [closed]

I know the word "stale" has one meaning as (of a check or legal claim) invalid because out of date. However, I need a word indicating that some information or data is invalid because out of data. ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

instead of “you're in my hair”, someone said “you're on my hair”, is that right? or different meaning?

https://www.instagram.com/p/B0SVsbHJN5Z/ It seemed a hilarious one, but I just don't get it. If it wanted to say same as "I love you but you're annoying a little bit", why did it use "on my hair", or ...
1
vote
3answers
82 views

“Make strong paper” or “Make paper strong?” Are these sentences both correct?

thank you for taking the time to take a look at my question! I am currently a teacher of English and an ex-in-company translator in startups. Now I am having a question about the correctness of a ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Categorial grammar, Is 'leg' an adjective in 'skipping leg days'

I am working on CCG (combinatory categorial grammar), which assigns categories to words. So I was wondering if 'leg' is adjective, or just another noun in the phrase "skipping leg days". Or is "leg ...
0
votes
2answers
41 views

Where should “inherent” be in these sentences?

This sentence is from the Cambridge dictionary: "There are risks inherent in almost every sport." inherent is an adjective, and it describes risks at there so as a second alternative "There are ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

my bank just sent a statement titled: Banking Done Different [duplicate]

Is it ever correct to write Banking Done Different? I am surprised to find this printed at the top of my savings account statement
0
votes
0answers
13 views

which is the more adjectove

Delaney sits, switches on and logs in. Password; GENIUS. ‘It’s not me,’ he replies. The late weekend reporter shift on The Evening Kernel is completely pointless. By early afternoon the paper is ...
0
votes
0answers
5 views

Is there any difference in meaning between “how” and “what” when each is used to start a subordinate clause? [migrated]

Is there any difference between how and what in the following sentence? Anny was just telling Wendy how she liked to eat the ice cream at the shop. Anny was just telling Wendy what she liked to eat ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Adjective of quality problem

Why is He is cowardly not correct as cowardly is acting as an adjective of quality? While He is intelligent is correct.
1
vote
1answer
46 views

Which one should I use? “OF IT” or “OF WHICH” [closed]

I bought a watermelon from the market, half ---- was rotten, so I threw it away and bought a new one. It seems to me both of them are correct.
-1
votes
1answer
43 views

'Too much' with countable noun [closed]

He has too much friend. Is this correct? If so, what is rule for using much for countable noun or should I use many instead? Please clarify.
-1
votes
2answers
26 views

Should I use “Most of which” or “Some of them”?

Afghanistan is estimated to have 73 million tons of coal reserves, ... are located in the northern part of the country.
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Adjective after noun?

I come across a sentence: The many problems inherent in the setup are deep and disturbing. Does the adjective inherent modify the problems? and what does deep and disturbing mean in the sentence?...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

Should I use WHICH or BY WHICH?

"Photosynthesis is the process ---- green plants and certain other organisms use the energy of light to convert carbon dioxide and water into the simple glucose." It seems "which" is more correct. ...
-1
votes
0answers
31 views

Why “Present Continuous” is not called “Continuous Present”?

I'm not talking about the tense itself but the position of the words. In one hand we have "Simple Present" which is completly clear to me since the word "Simple" acts as an adjuctive and comes before "...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Are both “6-month follow-up” and “6-months follow-up” correct? [duplicate]

After a quick search it seems that most people would prefer "6-month follow-up". I just wonder if one is correct and one incorrect or if both usage can be justified. I try to understand the logic ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

What part of speech is “almost” when applied to an adjective? [closed]

If I say that "the box is almost flat" what part of speech is "almost"? I can't say "the box is almost", so it does not appear to be an adjective itself. It seems to be a word that modifies the ...
1
vote
3answers
44 views

Word for an idea or concept that cannot be summarised?

I came across an adjective describing ideas or notions (particularly relevant to a body of work such as literature or a philosophical system) that is unable to be summarised without losing the purpose ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

The meaning and usage of 'Dinner is served'

In the Disney animation 'UP', there's this line starting at 12 seconds into this video: MUNTZ: Well, dinner is served! Right this way. (You may want to see the video at least until 22 seconds.) ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Is “U.S.” in “U.S.-China trade” a noun or adjective?

In the work I am writing, I am using “United States” for noun and “U.S.” for adjective. I was a bit confused whether the U.S. in the phrase U.S.-China trade is a noun or adjective. I didn’t get ...
0
votes
2answers
79 views

Is there an adverb for “ungodly”?

All dictionaries listed ungodly only as an adjective. Ungodlily was listed on Word Hippo, but I'm not so sure if it's reliable. So, is there an adverb for ungodly, and if so, what is it? Ungodlily ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

Part of speech of “little or no” [closed]

What part of speech is the word "no" in "There is little or no magic about them"
0
votes
2answers
44 views

Looking for a Very Specific Adjective

Is there a word to describe a person who is both of the following? a) insidious - in the traditional sense...that they have a tendency to use or harm people in such a way that the victim does not ...
2
votes
2answers
106 views

What's a word used for someone who criticizes his country but doesn't let any foreigner criticize his country?

I noticed some people attack foreigners who say anything negative about their country, yet they themselves criticize their same country and are being negative. What's a word that describes them? ...
0
votes
2answers
38 views

Looking for an adjective for an elected but not yet in charge person

I'm looking for an adjective for an elected but not yet in charge person. I remember that there was a synonym for "soon to be" and "President-elect" but that's not the word I'm looking for. As far as ...
1
vote
2answers
34 views

Another Term for “Long-Thought”

So I was doing a bit of writing and ended up using the phrase "long-thought" (as in, "a technique long-thought forgotten" or "people long-thought incapable of using magic"). I ended up using it quite ...