Questions tagged [whiz-deletion]

A phenomenon where the relative pronoun and the verb "to be" are removed from certain relative clauses.

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Adjective use after nouns: with and without that-clause [closed]

Let us take a look at these adjectives: able, similar, capable, ready, etc. We are free to stick them to the back of any noun thus avoiding using that/who-clause, like in these examples: Presumably, ...
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Noun + Gerund Structure Differences [closed]

Just need your insights on the sentences that really boggle my mind. The first sentence below is an excerpt taken from the following article: The effect of smoking on bone healing It is difficult to ...
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The usage of "WHO" as a conjunction [closed]

I've just started reading the Booker Prize-winning novel "The Sellout". I don't know the narrator has omitted " who" here or he is talking about himself when he says "...
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Question about the word order [duplicate]

I know these two sentences are correct: Europeans consider climate change to be the most serious problem facing the world. Perhaps the most serious problem facing the environment is global warming. ...
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Use of which in a sentence

In the following sentences, is it necessary to use which? SRH, a recombination model, is used for direct bandgap materials. SRH, which is a recombination model, is used for direct bandgap ...
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Past participle as adjective without verb 'to be' [duplicate]

Looking at the clause "... to talk to two separate people or groups involved in a disagreement" is the word 'involved' an adjective here? If it is, shouldn't it be 'that are involved'?
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How can an adjective follow and modify an adverb in “somewhere new”? Is this ellipsis?

I would like to go somewhere new tonight. I met someone nice at the party Are the preceding two sentences the same as the following, but with ellipsis applied? I would like to go somewhere [that is] ...
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Why Shakespeare used "come" in the line "A Daniel come to judgement?"

From The Merchant of Venice, 1596: SHYLOCK: A Daniel come to judgment! yea, a Daniel! O wise young judge, how I do honour thee! Is it a perfect tense with the auxiliary verb omitted? And is it a ...
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Omitting Relative Pronoun and verb "be" [duplicate]

Could someone please explain, why the pronoun and the verb "be" are omitted in the following sentence? "it allows communication even for people far away from each other" Shouldn't this sentence be "...
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Omission of "is" in "She thought the study of Latin a waste of time."

In The Elements of Style, the authors give this example: She thought the study of Latin a waste of time. I cannot understand why the verb is has been omitted. Should not this sentence be as: ...
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What is the grammatical topic of this shortening technique?

Extracted from an English cloze test: .....these virtual selves exist in the same online spaces that many people use every day. And this is a new and unfamiliar phenomenon that some people might ...
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Is it Gerund or adjective?

I don't understand the function of "coming" word in the sentence below. ... as they weigh the scale of monetary easing coming later this month. Is it working as a gerund? and if so, why is it in ...
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Is there any difference between “ i was woken up by a ringing bell” and “ i was woken up by a bell ringing”?

I tried looking in the internet but could not find any appropriate answers.
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Omitting which is?

When I was writing an essay, I thought about saying: "There is nothing that is more important than . . ." , then I googled it, but it appears the following sentence is more popular. "There is ...
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pictures painted & pictures which had been painted

What is the difference between these sentences and when to use each one of them? : -George showed me some pictures painted by his father. -George showed me some pictures which had been painted by ...
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28 votes
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Shakespearean relative clause: "I have a brother is condemned to die"

In Measure for Measure 2.2.785, Shakespeare wrote the following sentence: I have a brother is condemned to die. I am wondering why he omitted the relative pronoun and left the helping verb. Isn't ...
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When can the relative pronouns "who", "which", "that" etc. be safely omitted? [closed]

For example, instead of The guy who is beside me is a jerk I can say The guy beside me is a jerk. It is okay if I don't use the relative pronoun here, either way is correct. But instead ...
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To avoid ambiguity, what is your opinion about how to use reduced relative clauses? [closed]

There are many rules in using reduced relative clauses to avoid ambiguity. These rules appeared in different reference respectively. However, there are no unified rules. One reference often gives ...
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Is it correct to use 'present' after a noun or pronoun?

Can an adjective go just after a noun? The teachers present in the hall are my life saviours. In this sentence is using 'present in the hall' right or should I say 'presenting in the hall'?
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"named" vs "that is named"

I want to describe my business and want to refer to it in a sentence. I am trying to say: "In 2015 we established a business (that is) named X". Intuitively, the "that is" part is redundant, and ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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Can I reduce the relative clause after 'since' to a phrase?

The title might be confusing because I don't know how to phrase the question correctly. Here is an example: The Asian Games have been promoted in all aspects since the first Games which were held ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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What is the difference between a Whiz deletion and using the present participle as an adjective?

The sleeping babies are adorable. and The babies sleeping are adorable. To me, the two sentences are identical in meaning. However, this doesn't seem to be the case in the following sentence: ...
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Is whiz deletion used with this sentence?

I don't want to go to a not nice place. I don't want to go to a place not nice. I know that the first one is correct, and the second one is too. My question is, is whiz deletion used for the second ...
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Dropping of "was" from "A couple of ministers had to resign too, among them [was] Interior Minister Fouchet."

A couple of ministers had to resign too, among them Interior Minister Fouchet. I don't know what type of rule is used to delete needed "was" in this sentence. My opinion is that "was" should be ...
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Putting descriptive words in reverse order

There are sentences like this. He was a calm and nice person. He talked with vaguely old and British expression. I always thought that since "calm and nice" is not a phrase, it came before ...
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“His eyes, still on me, were speaking of cruelty.” [closed]

Is this sentence considered correct? His eyes, still on me, were speaking of cruelty. I think whiz-deletion is applied to it, but I am not entirely sure. Can someone tell me?
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What type of clause can this be?

While I was reading a book, I chanced on a clause that I found very odd. It says, The sea, inches beneath me yet too far for my eyes, buffeted the raft. At first I thought the italicised part was ...
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2 votes
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Using "which are" or omitting it

A Korean software engineer wrote the following sentence. There are several algorithms commonly used by software developers. But his native English-speaking teacher corrected it by inserting "which ...
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2 votes
2 answers
277 views

I found an unusual usage of adj, please tell me how it works [closed]

Following the terror attacks in London on July 7, 2005, the then Prime Minister Tony Blair insisted those responsible were motivated by an "evil ideology," ... From CNN. It uses those responsible; I ...
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1 answer
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omitting relative pronoun in a non-restrictive clause

We often omit relative pronouns in restrictive clauses. E.g. "I am flying to a place I love" instead of "I am flying to a place that I love." It seems ok to omit the which/who in the following. But ...
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Can you omit "which was" in this sentence?

For example: "The song, which was released in 1982, has since become a hit." "The song, released in 1982, has since become a hit." Do these two sentences mean the same thing, and are they both ...
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Removing "who were" in "The park was empty except for a group of people who were stretching, jogging, and doing Tai Chi" [duplicate]

Can I remove who were in the sentence below? The park was empty except for a group of elderly people who were stretching, jogging, and doing Tai Chi Is it still grammatical?
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When to omit "that" and "who" [duplicate]

I have some doubts about the usages of that and who. Sometimes I read sentences such as You are someone I love. You are someone who I love. People were asked to describe the qualities they ...
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4 votes
2 answers
2k views

"that" omission, subject-verb distance [duplicate]

when can we remove 'that'? I've heard different opinions I bought the book that is required for this course I bought the book required for this course I recommend that you take my advice I recommend ...
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"Those exposed to extreme cold" vs. "those who are exposed to extreme cold"

I saw the following example sentence in a TOEFL preparation book: To prevent frostbite, those exposed to extreme cold are advised to wiggle their fingers and toes to increase blood circulation. ...
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Complex compound adjective (adverbial phrase + participle)

A relative of mine and I have hit a brick wall in trying to agree on the grammaticality and stylistic suitability of one his sentences: However, it proved incapable of jeopardizing the under-...
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6 votes
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passive Vs active or omission of 'which is'

What is the part of speech of 'regarded' in the following? "a quality of beauty and intensity of emotion regarded as characteristic of poems" (NOAD) Why isn't it "... [which is] regarded ..."? ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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Passive auxiliary verb or progressive one?

Uncle Vernon made another funny noise, like a mouse being trodden on.                —Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone Is ‘being’ a passive auxiliary verb or a progressive one?
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12 votes
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Can a preposition have the form of superlative?

They had almost reached the door when a voice spoke from the chair nearest them, "I can't believe you're going to do this.” I guess nearest is at the place of preposition. Can a preposition have ...
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2 votes
2 answers
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Order of participial adjective

I'm proof-reading a thesis by one of my friends and there's some recurring construct which I always mark as false but I'd like to check with you. In the comments I was told that the example I ...
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4 votes
1 answer
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What do you call a past participle+noun construction clause such as “No offense meant” “Your point taken,” “With that said,” and “Given that”?

In reference to my question about the usage of “No offense meant/taken,” I noticed that there are a lot of shortened forms like “No offense meant/taken,” “Your point taken,” “That said,” and “Given ...
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2 votes
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"There are several reasons proposed for the collapse of the bridge."

There are several reasons proposed for the collapse of the bridge. Is this present simple tense or the present perfect tense? I thought it might be the latter since there is a retrospective aspect to ...
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2 votes
2 answers
167 views

On the structure of "search for weapons and bands of pro-Hussein fighters still holding out"

I came across the following expression: The primary task of many American troops in Baghdad has been to search for weapons and bands of pro-Hussein fighters still holding out. This is from a ...
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17 votes
3 answers
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What is a noun modifying clause?

This is actually a question that came up when I was studying Japanese. Unfortunately my grasp of the technical language of syntax is very limited, and I never fully comprehended the idea of a noun ...
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