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Questions tagged [participles]

A participle is a form of a verb that is used in a sentence to modify a noun, noun phrase, verb or verb phrase, and thus plays a role similar to that of an adjective or adverb.

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Why "when we first begun" in Amazing Grace?

In the hymn Amazing Grace, the final verse reads thus: When we've been there 10,000 years Bright shining as the sun We've no less days to sing God's praise Than when we first begun Given that we ...
Leonard Blavatsky's user avatar
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". . . he can't bear her to look sad."

(From A Terrible Kindness by Jo Browning Wroe, Part I Aberfan, chapter 12 September 1957) (The boy chorister saying goodbye to his mum) 'I'm so proud of you,' Evelyn (his mum) is saying, the tide in ...
philphil's user avatar
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Can We Use Participle Clauses as Supplements with Continuative and Non-continuative Perfects?

I've recently read a section in The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language where Huddleston and Pullum talk about the focus of the perfect. They talk about the referred time (in the case of the ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
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have+past participlet+that+Subject+IS or WAS

Examples I have always thought he is/was a good guy. I have always thought a boat doesn't/didn't float. I have always thought the sun rises/rose in the east. What are the DIFFERENCES? Is there an ...
無姓名's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
62 views

Participle clauses after "even"

You can do that even from home. You can do that even when working from home. (1)You can do that even working from home. (2)?You can do that even living in Korea. You can do that even when hurt, angry,...
desmo's user avatar
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Grammar of “In Meditations, Aurelius wrote about ways to live a Stoic life, asserting that humans should aim to live a virtuous life to be happy”

Below: a photo of a learner's textbook exercise page with a reading passage about a Stoic Roman emperor, with punctuation issues – and a question about punctuation, with rejoinders. "A" (the ...
Mr.Brian's user avatar
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38 views

How can I determine the aspect of a participle clause like this "A person parking a car in an illegal place will be arrested."

(1)A person parking a car in an illegal place will be arrested. Which is true, (A) or (B)? How can I determine the aspect of participle clause like this. (A) The rule (1) applies only to those who ...
Aki's user avatar
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The correct negative form (past participle)

I've been searching the answer to my question wherever it is possible, but I haven't managed to get the strict rule (or guideline) for it. As we know the negative form of the past participle is ...
Deeo's user avatar
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1 answer
66 views

What is the hidden subject of "making" (particple) in the following sentence?

What is the subject of "making" in the following sentence? It seems that it is the most reasonable grammatically to think "Yakkleman Skin Care" is the hidden subject of making. ...
L-traveler's user avatar
2 votes
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How Would You Explain "One's Work Protecting...." Grammatically? [duplicate]

I do not feel comfortable with such constructs that contain "one's work ...ing" as the following: "University of British Columbia marine biologist Amanda Vincent has won the ...
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Why can we use present participles but not past participles in some reduced relative clauses?

Who’s the girl dancing over there? = Who's the girl (who is) dancing over there? BUT this sentence is not possible: Who's the girl danced with my husband? = Who's the girl (who) danced with my husband?...
Chilli's user avatar
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Participial phrase with a subject unomitted [duplicate]

I wonder this sentence is both grammatically and idiomatically correct. "That movie having a pretty big budget, filmmakers did not need to have one in order to succeed."
runner's user avatar
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1 answer
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Is it grammatical to use a participle phrase with a different subject from the preceding clause? [duplicate]

As I understand it, the standard use of a participle phrase is something like, The man walked into the room smoking a cigarette. In this case, the subject for the participle phrase smoking a ...
Sam's user avatar
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1 answer
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adjective vs adverb for a gerund

This sentence occurs in Wikipedia: The method of voting can range from formal submission of written votes, through show of hands, voice voting or audience response systems, to informal noting which ...
Anton Sherwood's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
55 views

Why is a plural noun followed by present participle incorrect? [duplicate]

Discussing what they do to earn extra cash, a friend told me: "I get paid for dogs walking." I think they should use the singular, "I get paid for dog walking". My friend replied,...
KirkMartinez's user avatar
3 votes
5 answers
413 views

Struggling with participle phrases - adjectival vs adverbial

I'm struggling to identify when a participle phrase is adjectival vs. adverbial. For example: Turning into the parking lot, the girl could see that lines were already forming. ^ "Turning into the ...
Dee's user avatar
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Passive or Adjective 'respected' [closed]

Is the following sentence passive or is 'respected' used an adjective?: He is respected. And how would one know the difference?
Lab coat's user avatar
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Is "remained considered guilty" grammatical?

I'm currently reading Huddleston and Pullum (2002). In section 1.3 (p. 79), they note that the following sentence is ungrammatical: (1) The boss seemed considered guilty of bias. I agree that this is ...
alphabet's user avatar
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Is 'Coming' used as participle preposition?

"Coming less than a year after the ignominious US withdrawal from Afghanistan, Moscow's absorption of Ukraine would have further undermined the credibility of US as a global power. " This is ...
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Participle clause containing a subject [duplicate]

I am confused as to whether it is correct to use a participle clause as a nonessential element in a sentence like with a participle phrase. For example, I know that the following sentence is correct: ...
stuckonaparticiple's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
91 views

Word order of participial and nonparticipial adjectives

I am interested in whether there is any correlation between the word order of NP modifiers and their morphology, which could be purely adjectival or participial. First off, nonparticipial adjectives ...
Zoltan's user avatar
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“The buildings are owned by him.” Is this a verbal stative passive or an adjectival passive?

In terms of what I’ve seen: “Adjectival passives always have stative interpretations, whereas verbal passives can either have a dynamic or a stative interpretation.” So…. If I have a sentence, such as:...
Taylor B.'s user avatar
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1 answer
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How clearly separate "could be **ed", "has been **ed" and "will be **ed" in the "participle + noun" combinations?

Well, I have the programming examples only, but I suppose it could be reused on the common English. AFAIK "Imported namespace" could mean: Namespace which has been imported Namespace which ...
Takeshi Tokugawa's user avatar
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1 answer
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How can I best describe the content of the object complement in the sentences below? [duplicate]

I came here after reading that perception verbs should be followed by either a base infinitive or a present participle as in the following examples: I saw the car crash into the barrier. I saw the ...
Damian Eastwood's user avatar
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1 answer
143 views

Past participle form of the verbs "walk", "meet", "sit", etc

From the explanation about participle phrases from this British Council's page, it lists some past participles such as gone, read, seen, walked, etc.. Having said that, I tried to construct sentences ...
Khanh Tran's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
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Passive participial clauses

Ive found the following example: I heard my name being shouted. In this case, they use an passive participle. But if you want to connect two sentences, you do the following: The house was built ...
Hans Mustermann's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
92 views

Is there such a thing as a participle phrase?

Look at the girl dancing on the stage. Look at the dancing girl. They are a happily married couple. The Japanese are now a meat-eating people. I understand that "dancing on the stage" in ...
Exp's user avatar
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1 answer
565 views

Ground or grounded - and why? [closed]

In the sentence, This particular discipline was ground by the strict protocols of its predecessors. Why is it ground and not grounded? To me it feels like I should use the infinitive 'ground' as a ...
x30's user avatar
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Being interested/Interested in nitroglycerine, over the years, Alfred himself performed…?

Sample test: _________ (interest) in nitroglycerine, over the years, Alfred himself performed so many experiments to make sure it could be put into practical use in construction work. The given answer ...
Yuan Ding's user avatar
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41 views

Participle or Gerund? [duplicate]

Is “ferrying” in the following passage a gerund or a present participle? In March 2016, Zipline, a U.S. startup partnered with the Rwandan government to launch the world’s first commercial drone ...
Yukio's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
292 views

Using participle constructions instead of subordinate clauses

I'm studying to become a teacher. Yesterday, my students took a test. The first task was to rewrite the given sentences using a participle construction. Right now, I'm struggling with one sentence ...
Julia's user avatar
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3 answers
150 views

Perfect Continuous Passive Participle Clause?

Having been being lost in the woods for hours, he was finally found by emergency services. Does this mean: After he had been being lost in the woods for hours, he was finally found by emergency ...
lil' barbussy's user avatar
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1 answer
46 views

Awkward mission statement with "being" used possibly incorrectly in a participle clause [closed]

I am a native English speaker but have lived abroad for many years now. I hear various proficiencies in English every day and therefore, some common mistakes that wouldn't sound natural/correct back ...
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1 vote
2 answers
166 views

What Do We Call: Having Been + Present Participle?

I am inquiring in terms of classic prescriptive grammar. As a preface, please consider the following usage of the perfect participle. I, [having played] well, am proud of my game. The participial ...
Matthew Rips's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
50 views

participle clauses/absolute phrases

Being tired, I got some rest at home. Tired, I got some rest at home. Rich, he wasn't happy. Why are the sentences above correct, but these aren't? Sick, he couldn't attend the meeting. Old, he ...
teslteacher's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

Rules to follow to choose when to use the present participle and when to use the past participle [closed]

Mark, dressed in black, walked across the room. Mark, dressing in black, walked across the room. I think both sentences are correct but what's the difference in meaning between both of them? Also, is ...
Manar's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
205 views

Bare infinitive or present participle? [closed]

Which of the following two sentences is correct? The one that uses the bare infinitive 'hear', or the one that uses the present participle 'hearing'? He heard him snore last night. Or He heard him ...
Eric's user avatar
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0 answers
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Do you need a context to fully understand what a participle clause means? [duplicate]

Having finished the work, he went home. As you can see, there is no context available in that sentence. So, the above sentence could mean: Because he had finished the work, he went home. Or, After ...
Mostafizur Rahman's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
664 views

"As pets being welcome, she stayed at the hotel with her dog." [closed]

I know that the the following two sentences are validly structured. Pets being welcome, she stayed at the hotel with her dog. and As pets were welcome, she stayed at the hotel with her dog. The ...
Min's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
134 views

What case of 'I' should be used in a Participle Clause? [duplicate]

Which of the following sentences is grammatically correct? I being not at home, my friend left a message. Me being not at home, my friend left a message. My being not at home, my friend left a ...
Arjun's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
841 views

Participle phrases and Inversion

In enwiki.org, this example is provided for showing inversion after a Participle phrases: Lurking in the corner stood a chicken with an ax, ready to take on the farmer in a fight to the death. In ...
bob's user avatar
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0 answers
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Participial phrase separating main verbs

Let's say you have the following sentence: I stood there and wondered what to do next. Now, let's say you insert a participial phrase after "there." I stood there looking at her and wondered ...
Eric1982's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Can the present participle be used as adverbials of purpose?

Usually, infinitives with 'to' are used to indicate adverbials of purpose. e.g. I go downstairs to collect my parcel. In order to keep warm, my dog curls up on the rug beside my bed every evening. ...
Eglantine's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
8k views

"___ was a song sung by […]" or "___ was a song sang by […]"? [closed]

I'm aware that sung is the past participle of sing, while sang is the past tense form, but I'm still unsure on whether or not one would use the past tense or past participle verb in this sentence: &...
Nixoli's user avatar
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1 answer
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Does the (etymological) definition of 'participle' include 'noun'?

BACKGROUND The definition of 'participle' is something along the line of: a word having the characteristics of both verb and adjective (M-W Dictionary) the form of a verb that usually ends in "...
JK2's user avatar
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1 answer
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Is the following a gerund or participle in this sentence?

I'm not feeling myself today. In the sentence above, is 'feeling' a gerund or participle? (I understand that the main verb is 'am', from which I can then ascertain that it is at least one of these ...
x30's user avatar
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0 votes
3 answers
48 views

How do I analyze this sentence from John Dyson's "Don't Look Down"?

John Dyson's DON'T LOOK DOWN has a sentence that reads: The cable heaping on the roof, even a vibration from the men inside, could nudge the 2.4-ton cage into free fall. The cable heaping on the ...
user405662's user avatar
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-2 votes
2 answers
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Is it correct to say, "The specimen was observed using a microscope."

In scientific journals, we often find passive sentences like "The specimen was observed using a microscope" and "The specimen was observed by using a microscope." Are they correct? ...
Simon's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
291 views

Why is it a "vexed question", rather than a "vexing question"?

If I understand it correctly, a "vexed question" is bothering, annoying, and frustrating us; not being bothered, annoyed, and frustrated by us. As such, I'd expect the active (present, -ing) ...
Fab's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
264 views

Being + P.P construct as progressive form of -ed participle or passive form

Regarding Being + P.P construct: In The Grammar Book it is described as Progressive: but the same construct in Cambridge Grammar of English is described as Passive: Which one is correct?
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