Questions tagged [participles]

A participle is a form of a verb that is used in a sentence to modify a noun, noun phrase, verb or verb phrase, and thus plays a role similar to that of an adjective or adverb.

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Future Active Infinitive

I am a Latin student, and often find myself having to complete verb synopses. In these, I write all the possible forms and modifications a verb could possibly take, along with the English translation....
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43 views

Example of a Verb that is NOT a participle

I am confused about what a "participle" is. Wiki defines it as: "A participle (ptcp) is a form of a verb that is used in a sentence to modify a noun, noun phrase, verb, or verb phrase, and plays a ...
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Using the gerund as an English analogue of Russian verbal participles

Could you please verify that using the gerund is normal as an analogue of Russian verbal participles in the following phrase: The device automatically estimates calories, consumed from food, basing ...
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3answers
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“stuck” vs “sticking” vs “stick” - Why is this third sentence weird? Issue of: Participles or Aspects?

Lots of people have his photo stuck on their wall. Lots of people have his photo sticking on their wall. Lots of people have his photo stick on their wall. The third sentence doesn't necessarily ...
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Can someone PLEASE tell me what the gerunds and participles are in these sentences? PLEASE [duplicate]

Dozing in the sun at the beach after swimming, limbs exhausted, salt dring stiff in my hair. Cutting up vegetables into neat pieces. Flying into a city and at night seeing the lit gauze of its ...
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2answers
28 views

Past participle

Why in this sentence past participle goes without auxiliary verb? The table painted red, the sofa covered with American leather of a reddish colour with little green flowers on it, and the clothes ...
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1answer
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-ing forms after a comma: reduced participle phrase or gerund?

In sentences like "the results show x, leading researchers to believe..." or "..., indicating that further research must be done" or "..., proving the validity of the theory..." etc is the -ing ...
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64 views

What part of speech is “surrounded” in this sentence?

"The cat was surrounded by mice." What part of speech is "surrounded" in this sentence? To me, it seems like the verb "surround" is being used as a past participle in the passive voice... hence, it's ...
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2answers
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Participles - Past simple + Simple continuous or past simple + past simple?

Megan fell off her bike, hurt___ her leg. Should it be hurt or hurting? My mind goes to hurt, however it seems like there are different rules in participles for example; Hearing the news, she ...
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Past participle of stand

I'm new to this community, I hope the question fits this somewhat. Say we have a sentence: The tree which stands in the garden is beautiful. Now using participle construction this becomes: The ...
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What is the official rule(s) regarding punctuation and end-sentence participles?

I tried searching for this, but only received more questions, instead of answers. Recently, I was asked a question about participial phrases and the punctuation that surrounds them. Attempting to ...
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What I resented was [Kim mistreating my cat]. Why is [] a subordinate clause?

I intended Kim to interview both candidates. [raised object] I intended for Kim to interview both candidates. [subject] As shown above, The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language analyzes an ...
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They stayed that way: he/him/his playing his guitar, she/her singing her songs

I've found other threads (see example links below), but I still can't sort this one out on my own. Are these -ings gerunds or participles? And therefore should they be preceded by accusative, ...
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192 views

with/without + pronoun (me vs. my) + gerund-participial phrase

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 461) has this section: (f) Subject of clausal complement of with/without Pronouns in this position normally appear in accusative case: [...
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4answers
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'Starting' in March [participle or preposition]

Starting in March, people will also finally be able to buy the Exodus phone with cash and not just cryptocurrency. Is 'starting' here a participle form of a verb or a preposition? If it's a ...
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4answers
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You need your eyes testing

My question is about the regional acceptability of sentences such as the following: You need your eyes testing. I need my hair cutting. I want my car washing. The second example is given in the ...
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2answers
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Rescue dogs vs rescued dogs

Why is a dog that has been saved from the pound called a rescue dog instead of a rescued dog?
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62 views

The king wanted him killed VS The king wanted him to be killed [duplicate]

Do the following sentences mean the same thing or are they different? The king wanted him killed. The king wanted him to be killed. Please use examples to explain the differentiations.
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Gerund or Infinitives?

How can I grammatically explain gerund "seeking" in this sentence? Can I use "to seek" instead? I am Sharron Biggs, CEO and founder of BiggsGraphics. I recently came across your advertisement ...
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2answers
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Whereas + present participle

Is it grammatically correct to use whereas + a present participle? For example: I am disinclined to recognize my weak mathematical skills, whereas willing to admit my lack of English skills. This ...
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1answer
43 views

2 forms of past participle with different meanings [closed]

I'm looking for more examples similar to this: "hanged vs. hung", namely the examples where both forms are correct but the meaning of each one is different. Can anyone help?
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Word order of sentences with “included”

For the participle "included", there are two options that both sound similar to me. However, one option might be preferred above the other. It might also be that there is an underlying grammatical ...
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2answers
44 views

'eliminating, publicising, communicating, allocating': Are these words gerunds or participial adjectives?

Are these words gerunds or participial adjectives? Eliminating the secrecy surrounding pay by openly communicating everyone's remuneration, publicising performance bonuses and allocating annual ...
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1answer
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“My eyebrows raised” or “my eyebrows rose”? (Passive voice)

The day before, as I watched the dog soar over the fence, my jaw dropped, and my eyebrows raised as I tried to comprehend how the dog could jump so high. My editor says "try to avoid passive voice" ...
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1answer
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Participle clauses

I have this participle clause in this sentence: Having confessed his mistake, he begged for forgiveness. I want to rewrite this sentence but I'm considering which one is correct. He has ...
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1answer
52 views

Correct use of the present participle?

Can someone kindly explain to me which is correct, and why? I have done some research on this issue and I'm not sure of the name of the construct that I am looking for. "After washing the dishes, the ...
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2answers
204 views

Problems of Use of Participle in Academic Writing: “When considering” VS “When considered”

I have questions about the participle phrase in academic writing which are related to the dangling modifiers of 3 cases. Could you explain me more the appropriate use of sentences with the participle ...
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Dangling Participle? [closed]

Is the following question grammatically correct? "I have found a solution I am happy with." I've been told the word "with" is a dangling participle.
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1answer
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Participle phrase or participle clause? For my students please

I've looked at other answers, but am still confused - so please don't shoot me down (as tends to happen here) - but rather help if you can for the sake of my little learners. I have to teach a class ...
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1answer
235 views

“my email ID has changed” vs “my emil ID is/has been changed”

I want to ask one thing. Sometimes we hear people say my email ID has changed. As per my understanding present perfect tenses need a subject which is missing above. I find these sentences little ...
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2answers
160 views

Bare infinitive after “help” with intervening past participle phrase

Which is correct? Our mission is to help everyone touched by tragedy thrive. or Our mission is to help everyone touched by tragedy to thrive. I know that technically help can admit the bare ...
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2answers
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“A lengthy accounting of what took place” vs. “a lengthy account of what took place”

I proof read a letter for a friend today. The body of the letter explained various situations over a 2 day period that made her uneasy. In her closing she wrote "I know this has been a very lengthy ...
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0answers
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long sentences in English [closed]

I am translating some text to English from Russian Wikipedia, and sometimes there are quite long sentences. It is ok to have long sentences with several subordinate and participle clauses in Russian. ...
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0answers
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We are sorry to see you go [duplicate]

I always encounter such phrase as "We are sorry to see you go" after unsubscribing from mailing lists. I've been always wondering why this phrase is said exactly like this, it looks grammatically ...
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Grammatical structure

Mental energy is a vital element needed to be able to concentrate one's attention and maintain a positive mental attitude. The question I want to ask is how the section in bold is functioning over ...
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440 views

subject of -ing word “being”

In the sentence, Girlfriend being tired, I decided to cook dinner Is the corresponding pronoun for "girlfriend" (She or Her) a syntactic requirement or a stylistic choice? If the verb were finite ("...
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2answers
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What is the grammatical nature of the word “been” in perfect progressive tenses?

The word been appears to be simply an auxiliary verb in all perfect progressive tenses (also in some perfect tenses with passive construction) and it is easy to see it that way. However, from a ...
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1answer
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“I met him(,) sitting on the chair(,) and talked to him.” Who was sitting on the chair?

I met him sitting on the chair and talked to him. - (He was sitting on the chair) I met him, sitting on the chair, and talked to him. - (I was sitting on the chair) Is that correct? I feel safer ...
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Gerund or Participle?

While waiting for service, patrons can enjoy coffee and snacks and mingle with their neighbors in need. Is "waiting" in this sentence a gerund or participle? This sentence and question actually ...
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Participle modifying a noun other than a subject

Example: "John jumped over the girl shouting angrily." I assume the participle construction replaces a relative clause in this case. ("who shouted angrily"). My question: Can a participle ...
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1answer
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the verb “shock” + participle phrase

I found a question asking: Upon leaving, we were shocked to discover/discovering that a mandatory tip of 15 percent was added to our bill. the answer is "to discover" to explain the reason why they ...
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1answer
571 views

“The cake was baked.” Is “baked” a past participle or predicate adjective? [duplicate]

The cake was baked. Is the word baked considered a predicate adjective? Would the word baked also be a past participle written in passive voice? I am just trying to figure this out.
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133 views

Adverbial modifier with the insertion of comma

I was studying about participles and one site a guy asked the following question: How would the meaning of the following sentences differ from each other? 1. The beach, located on the far side of ...
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5answers
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“I hate Jill singing those songs.” = “I hate Jill when she is singing those songs.”?

Can the sentence I hate Jill singing those songs. mean I hate Jill when she is singing those songs. Or does it mean something else?
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2answers
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how to use participle and subject

Is it compulsory to use subject in a sentence e.g "going up the hill,an old temple was seen" can we say going up the hill, they/we/he/she etc saw an old temple? or is it correct without subject?
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I have asked that + tense? [closed]

I'm proof reading a message and it reads as follows: I have asked that 'x' looks at your case and respond to your problem. Should this read: I have asked that 'x' looks at your case and responds to ...
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1answer
328 views

How do I know what a participial phrase is within a sentence?

Recently, I have realized that there are huge gaps in my knowledge in terms of grammar, so I have begun learning some of the basics. One thing I am trying to learn is the participial phrase. I ...
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I'd like to know Noun + past participle

I want to come home more relaxed. I'd like to know, why more relaxed comes after home if it modifies home. Or can more relaxed in this sentence be used as an adverb?
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Are these sentences actually ambiguous?

I just this web page and found towards the bottom a claim about ambiguous sentences, which doesn't seem right to me. According to the website: "Sitting by the fence, the dog growled at the cat" is ...
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Are “worshiping” and “worshipping” interchangeable? [closed]

Every online source seems to agree with the preconceived notion I had that the correct usage is "worshipping" with two p's, saying that "worshipping" is an exception to a rule about doubling the ...