Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 174 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [participles]

A participle is a form of a verb that is used in a sentence to modify a noun, noun phrase, verb or verb phrase, and thus plays a role similar to that of an adjective or adverb.

0
votes
0answers
13 views

Participle Phrase With And Without A Comma?

Just to clearify my understanding of these two sentences. Jack hurt himself trying to impress her. (When Jack tried to impress her, he hurt himself, accidentally.) Jack hurt himself, trying to ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Participal or another form?

I am having difficulties recognising the form of "reflecting" in the following movie title: A pigeon sat on a branch reflecting on existence. My case is that, I am comparing the translations of ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Using were/was + past participle or simple paste in this case is the best?

I would like to write : "His tongue clutched in mine as if they were melted together." Do I need the 'were' here or should I use it simply without. "His tongue clutched in mine as if they melted ...
4
votes
0answers
125 views

You need your eyes testing

My question is about the regional acceptability of sentences such as the following: You need your eyes testing. I need my hair cutting. I want my car washing. The second example is given in the ...
6
votes
2answers
66 views

Rescue dogs vs rescued dogs

Why is a dog that has been saved from the pound called a rescue dog instead of a rescued dog?
1
vote
0answers
62 views

The king wanted him killed VS The king wanted him to be killed [duplicate]

Do the following sentences mean the same thing or are they different? The king wanted him killed. The king wanted him to be killed. Please use examples to explain the differentiations.
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Gerund or Infinitives?

How can I grammatically explain gerund "seeking" in this sentence? Can I use "to seek" instead? I am Sharron Biggs, CEO and founder of BiggsGraphics. I recently came across your advertisement ...
2
votes
2answers
72 views

Whereas + present participle

Is it grammatically correct to use whereas + a present participle? For example: I am disinclined to recognize my weak mathematical skills, whereas willing to admit my lack of English skills. This ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

2 forms of past participle with different meanings [closed]

I'm looking for more examples similar to this: "hanged vs. hung", namely the examples where both forms are correct but the meaning of each one is different. Can anyone help?
1
vote
0answers
24 views

Word order of sentences with “included”

For the participle "included", there are two options that both sound similar to me. However, one option might be preferred above the other. It might also be that there is an underlying grammatical ...
1
vote
2answers
43 views

'eliminating, publicising, communicating, allocating': Are these words gerunds or participial adjectives?

Are these words gerunds or participial adjectives? Eliminating the secrecy surrounding pay by openly communicating everyone's remuneration, publicising performance bonuses and allocating annual ...
0
votes
1answer
119 views

“My eyebrows raised” or “my eyebrows rose”? (Passive voice)

The day before, as I watched the dog soar over the fence, my jaw dropped, and my eyebrows raised as I tried to comprehend how the dog could jump so high. My editor says "try to avoid passive voice" ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

Participle clauses

I have this participle clause in this sentence: Having confessed his mistake, he begged for forgiveness. I want to rewrite this sentence but I'm considering which one is correct. He has ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Correct use of the present participle?

Can someone kindly explain to me which is correct, and why? I have done some research on this issue and I'm not sure of the name of the construct that I am looking for. "After washing the dishes, the ...
0
votes
2answers
139 views

Problems of Use of Participle in Academic Writing: “When considering” VS “When considered”

I have questions about the participle phrase in academic writing which are related to the dangling modifiers of 3 cases. Could you explain me more the appropriate use of sentences with the participle ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

Dangling Participle? [closed]

Is the following question grammatically correct? "I have found a solution I am happy with." I've been told the word "with" is a dangling participle.
2
votes
1answer
81 views

Participle phrase or participle clause? For my students please

I've looked at other answers, but am still confused - so please don't shoot me down (as tends to happen here) - but rather help if you can for the sake of my little learners. I have to teach a class ...
2
votes
1answer
184 views

“my email ID has changed” vs “my emil ID is/has been changed”

I want to ask one thing. Sometimes we hear people say my email ID has changed. As per my understanding present perfect tenses need a subject which is missing above. I find these sentences little ...
0
votes
2answers
110 views

Bare infinitive after “help” with intervening past participle phrase

Which is correct? Our mission is to help everyone touched by tragedy thrive. or Our mission is to help everyone touched by tragedy to thrive. I know that technically help can admit the bare ...
0
votes
2answers
42 views

“A lengthy accounting of what took place” vs. “a lengthy account of what took place”

I proof read a letter for a friend today. The body of the letter explained various situations over a 2 day period that made her uneasy. In her closing she wrote "I know this has been a very lengthy ...
4
votes
0answers
110 views

long sentences in English [closed]

I am translating some text to English from Russian Wikipedia, and sometimes there are quite long sentences. It is ok to have long sentences with several subordinate and participle clauses in Russian. ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

We are sorry to see you go [duplicate]

I always encounter such phrase as "We are sorry to see you go" after unsubscribing from mailing lists. I've been always wondering why this phrase is said exactly like this, it looks grammatically ...
1
vote
0answers
181 views

Grammatical structure

Mental energy is a vital element needed to be able to concentrate one's attention and maintain a positive mental attitude. The question I want to ask is how the section in bold is functioning over ...
0
votes
0answers
370 views

subject of -ing word “being”

In the sentence, Girlfriend being tired, I decided to cook dinner Is the corresponding pronoun for "girlfriend" (She or Her) a syntactic requirement or a stylistic choice? If the verb were finite ("...
2
votes
2answers
105 views

What is the grammatical nature of the word “been” in perfect progressive tenses?

The word been appears to be simply an auxiliary verb in all perfect progressive tenses (also in some perfect tenses with passive construction) and it is easy to see it that way. However, from a ...
1
vote
0answers
61 views

“I met him(,) sitting on the chair(,) and talked to him.” Who was sitting on the chair?

I met him sitting on the chair and talked to him. - (He was sitting on the chair) I met him, sitting on the chair, and talked to him. - (I was sitting on the chair) Is that correct? I feel safer ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Gerund or Participle?

While waiting for service, patrons can enjoy coffee and snacks and mingle with their neighbors in need. Is "waiting" in this sentence a gerund or participle? This sentence and question actually ...
2
votes
0answers
65 views

Participle modifying a noun other than a subject

Example: "John jumped over the girl shouting angrily." I assume the participle construction replaces a relative clause in this case. ("who shouted angrily"). My question: Can a participle ...
0
votes
1answer
119 views

the verb “shock” + participle phrase

I found a question asking: Upon leaving, we were shocked to discover/discovering that a mandatory tip of 15 percent was added to our bill. the answer is "to discover" to explain the reason why they ...
0
votes
1answer
362 views

“The cake was baked.” Is “baked” a past participle or predicate adjective? [duplicate]

The cake was baked. Is the word baked considered a predicate adjective? Would the word baked also be a past participle written in passive voice? I am just trying to figure this out.
0
votes
1answer
96 views

Adverbial modifier with the insertion of comma

I was studying about participles and one site a guy asked the following question: How would the meaning of the following sentences differ from each other? 1. The beach, located on the far side of ...
3
votes
5answers
167 views

“I hate Jill singing those songs.” = “I hate Jill when she is singing those songs.”?

Can the sentence I hate Jill singing those songs. mean I hate Jill when she is singing those songs. Or does it mean something else?
0
votes
2answers
54 views

how to use participle and subject

Is it compulsory to use subject in a sentence e.g "going up the hill,an old temple was seen" can we say going up the hill, they/we/he/she etc saw an old temple? or is it correct without subject?
-1
votes
2answers
410 views

I have asked that + tense? [closed]

I'm proof reading a message and it reads as follows: I have asked that 'x' looks at your case and respond to your problem. Should this read: I have asked that 'x' looks at your case and responds to ...
3
votes
1answer
285 views

How do I know what a participial phrase is within a sentence?

Recently, I have realized that there are huge gaps in my knowledge in terms of grammar, so I have begun learning some of the basics. One thing I am trying to learn is the participial phrase. I ...
2
votes
0answers
120 views

I'd like to know Noun + past participle

I want to come home more relaxed. I'd like to know, why more relaxed comes after home if it modifies home. Or can more relaxed in this sentence be used as an adverb?
0
votes
3answers
191 views

Are these sentences actually ambiguous?

I just this web page and found towards the bottom a claim about ambiguous sentences, which doesn't seem right to me. According to the website: "Sitting by the fence, the dog growled at the cat" is ...
1
vote
1answer
870 views

Are “worshiping” and “worshipping” interchangeable? [closed]

Every online source seems to agree with the preconceived notion I had that the correct usage is "worshipping" with two p's, saying that "worshipping" is an exception to a rule about doubling the ...
2
votes
1answer
138 views

Which should I use, infinitive or participle? [closed]

I found this description in Wikipedia on infinitive. As a modifier of a noun or adjective. This may relate to the meaning of the noun or adjective ("a request to see someone"; "keen to get on"), or ...
1
vote
1answer
321 views

Difference between participal adjective and relative clause

I saw someone explained that participal adjectives have the same function as relative clauses. If that is correct, what is the difference between them? for examples, a bill requiring approval ...
0
votes
0answers
51 views

Do participles actually have a subject instead of word being modified?

Do participles actually have a subject instead of a word being modified? All the examples about participles having subjects that don't exist in the sentence (dangling participle) that I've seen start ...
2
votes
1answer
102 views

Can someone help me diagram this very confusing sentence?

The vase didn't look like I wanted it to. That is the sentence. My teacher said there is a participle, but I can't identify one. Thanks!
1
vote
2answers
79 views

Why is “banging his nose” possible but "answering the phone'' not possible?

He ran into the wall, banging his nose. He got out of bed, answering the phone. Why is the first one possible but is the second one not possible?
0
votes
2answers
263 views

Present participle with Simple Present tense [duplicate]

The boy comes running. My father stands behind me smiling. (I saw the first example in a grammar book and the second in a prose) In which cases is this particular form (S + action-verb + s/es of ...
0
votes
0answers
116 views

does the word haunted in the verb phrase “seemed to be haunted” also function as a modifier?

Directions: Find the participle and draw an arrow to the noun it modifies: Sentence: The old, abandoned house on the hill seemed to be haunted. My answer: abandoned is the participle and it ...
1
vote
0answers
117 views

reduced relative clause (or not) [closed]

I have a question of the sentence below. Every last drop of things like glue, paint and cosmetics will come out, leaving the container totally empty, and making you happier and richer. In the ...
2
votes
1answer
282 views

What is the tense of the verb, “remark,” in this sentence?

Here's the sentence: As I walked through the exhibit, I overheard a visitor remark, "You know, that grandfather clock actually runs." The "subject" of the verb is singular ("visitor"), so if ...
-1
votes
1answer
145 views

Use of conjunctive adverb with participle clause

I have written a sentence by using participle clause any contribution cannot be erased from the mind, therefore being essential for being successful. But my teacher is saying that "therefore being ...
1
vote
0answers
343 views

Is the word 'getting' used as a gerund in 'getting stronger every day'?

In the phrase, "Getting Stronger Every Day," I know that "getting" is a participle, but in this phrase, is it a gerund? If not, why?
11
votes
5answers
4k views

Hear Me Roar Vs Hear Me Roaring? [duplicate]

I give a sentence below from "Katy Perry-Roar'' "You're gonna hear me roar" Now my question is that why is the 'infinitive (hear)' used here after 'gonna', not 'participle' like 'you're gonna hear ...