Questions tagged [prefixes]

A prefix is an affix which is placed before the stem of a word

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1 answer
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Alternate formulations for "four-month anniversary" (one-third of a year)

Looking for alternate formulations to four-month anniversary, a formulation that would highlight the fact that one third of a year has gone by since a certain date. For six months there is the word ...
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1 answer
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Multiple use of a stem with differing prefixes

Does the English language allow for reusing a word stem in the context of multiple prefixes? E.g.: pre- and suffixes both need a stem sur- and interfaces The machine was dis- and reassembled If so,...
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What are the capitalisation rules for prefixes in parentheses?

If you'd like to write (co)promotor at the beginning of a sentence, should both 'co' and 'promotor' be capitalised? For example, is it "(Co)Promotors are advised to ..."? Or is there another ...
8 votes
2 answers
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Are there any class-changing prefixes in English?

Whenever I do a Google search about affixes, I find information like 'Prefixes usually do not change the class of the base word, but suffixes usually do change the class of the word' (UEfAP). As I ...
1 vote
1 answer
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Does the spelling of suffixes change in some cases like prefixes?

I know that prefixes never change the spelling of the stem. However, their spelling changes in some cases. For example: well+come = welcome (not wellcome) all+ways = always (not allways) in+regular =...
10 votes
2 answers
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Why "monatomic" and not "monoatomic"?

"Mono" means singular, and "atomic" stands for the atom. So combining them will give a single atom - "monatomic". But why is this so? Why can't it be "monoatomic&...
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5 votes
2 answers
849 views

What's a word for marrying someone of similar status?

Hypergamy is an action of marrying someone of a higher socio-economic class while hypogamy is doing the same for a person of lower socio-economic class. What is it called, if you marry someone of a ...
0 votes
1 answer
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Prefix in word 'elongation' [closed]

I just wondered if there is a e- prefix. For example to form the word elongation having as root the word long .
4 votes
1 answer
131 views

Prefixed words in English whose abbreviations skip the prefixes

I was writing an article about certain abbreviations in German. Two of the terms being abbreviated were Verschmelzungsfunktion and Vertauschungsfunktion. Abbreviating both of them as V would have ...
3 votes
0 answers
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Why do so many prefixes end with -o? (Visio, linguo) [closed]

At first I was wondering about “Deleuzoguattarian” but then I saw the Wiktionary list: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:English_prefixes which is quite striking. The answers in Origin of ...
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Conference and difference opposites? [closed]

I am reading a book where diffidence and confidence were juxtaposed. In a later sentence, I noticed the word difference also has this same dif- prefix that diffidence does. Does it make sense to ...
2 votes
2 answers
149 views

Is there a word category for a certain kind of words beginning with 'a-'? [duplicate]

A few words beginning with an a came up to my mind recently because their structure is similar in the way they convey their meaning. Those words are like: atop, alight; afloat, afresh, anew, asleep, ...
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1 vote
3 answers
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What's the Scottish equivalent of the prefix "Anglo-"?

Scotch gets misused and I don't want to join those ranks if it's incorrect. Celtic seems to cover a wider area. Pictish seems to be specific to the Northeast. Gaelic I always assume to be Irish. All ...
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Which of the two sounds more natural: corestrict or correstrict?

In mathematics, one uses the prefix co- to denote something that's dual to an already known object, for instance: limit -> colimit, basis -> cobasis, cycle -> cocycle, tangent -> cotagent, ...
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2 votes
1 answer
75 views

Prefixes hyphenated or spaced

As a professional typographer and proofreader (I know; rare and disappearing breeds, especially for being both at the same time! And yes, I’m also a graphic designer), I tend to follow what are called ...
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Use of "a-" before words, not the indefinite article [duplicate]

Sometimes I've found some words that start with an "a-" prefix, not the indefinite article. I think it's used to make the phrasing more euphonic and more "melodic", at least this ...
1 vote
1 answer
1k views

If 'pre' is previous, 'post' is after, and 'peri' is current, what is "initiation"?

In chronology: pre-event, ?-event, peri-event, post-event Maybe "ini-event" from Latin "initium"?
0 votes
1 answer
230 views

what does to word 'crete' mean in English? [closed]

In my native language, words are created using 'Root Words' + 'Prefixes/suffixes'. Also the root words make sense for us. Is English the same? For example I think the word 'crete' is the root and 'dis,...
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2 votes
1 answer
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Is it ever ac­cept­able to write slashes be­tween mul­ti­ple but sep­a­rate pre­fixes?

For ex­am­ple, can I get away with writing bio/tech­no­log­i­cal ad­vances have made? Even if this is or­tho­graph­i­cally ac­cept­able in one or another kind of writ­ten English, would it better for ...
1 vote
0 answers
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meaning of prefix "a" [duplicate]

While searching for an alternative synonym for the adjective starving, I found the word ahungered and I was intrigued by the use of the prefix a in this case. I looked up the etymology of the prefix a-...
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2 votes
3 answers
2k views

Difference between the prefixes "pre" and "ante"?

Thinking of the words "precedent" and "antecedent" led me to this question. They seem to mean almost exactly the same thing in their more general usages, but "antecedent" ...
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Why do some words containing a form of “philia” have it at the beginning and some have it at the end?

There are words like “philosophy”, “philology”, “philanthropy”; these have a form of “philia” at the beginning. Why don't these words have it at the end? Also, there are words like “haemophilia”, “...
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1 vote
1 answer
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How far can one go in creating new words?

Apparently the word disturbingly exists, but undisturbingly doesn't. However, I felt it better served to convey my meaning and was sure that any reader would understand what I mean. I also put it ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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palatization of y- from *ga-

Premises The common Proto-Germanic prefix *ga‑ affixed to past participles was reduced in Modern English, obscuring its historical participial morphology now beyond modern recognition, as seen for ...
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1 answer
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Hyphen between 2 words when prefix is in front of the 2 words

What's the correct way to put a prefix in front of something that's 2 or more words? Pre-Neolithic Revolution or pre-Neolithic-Revolution Pro-affirmative action or pro-affirmative-action Post-Civil ...
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Should we include the prefix Mrs. when we tell others our real name? [closed]

My question is so simple. We call a man with the prefix Mr. and a married woman with the prefix Mrs., followed by her husband's surname, right? Now, is it grammatically okay to include these prefixes ...
1 vote
2 answers
665 views

Nuancing the prefixes "meta-", "hyper-", and "super-". Any insight that'd help? [closed]

When detailing the definition of these prefixes, I'm usually faced with a deadlock as to which would fit the proper usage. Though, in general, I'd still like to understand each prefix's nuance to each ...
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"beginning" is to "prefix" as "end" is to "suffix" as "middle" is to... what?

The word "prefix" describes something affixed to the beginning of a word and the word "suffix" describes something affixed to the end of a word. What is the analog of these for ...
1 vote
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Why is the "r" doubled in "arrhythmia"? [duplicate]

Why is the "r" doubled in "arrhythmia" relative to "rhythmia"? I'm guessing it's because English resists hyphenation of prefixes and suffixes ("a-rhythmia"), ...
43 votes
4 answers
6k views

Why is the prefix "Trans" shortened to "X"? [duplicate]

In technical literature as well as aircraft user interfaces where there is not enough space to write the whole word, the prefix "trans" is shortened to "x". Transmit -> Xmit ...
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Do all "prefixes" can be use as "combining forms" or just some of them can be?

I wonder if all English prefixes can be used as "combining forms" or just some of them can be play role as "prefix" and combine with other words or affixes to form "compound forms". e.g "Chron-" ...
1 vote
1 answer
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Determing the lexical category of a word based on the affixes attached

I am currently taking a Linguistics course and am learning about affixes. Through reading the textbook and following the lectures, I have realized that certain prefixes and suffixes are attached to ...
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2 votes
2 answers
2k views

What prefix should I use to address individuals younger that 18 yrs?

Many summer programs/university applications require me to provide a prefix I would prefer to be called by. I always type "Mr.", but as I'm younger than 18, is this appropriate usage? Should I just ...
0 votes
3 answers
532 views

What is the proper prefix meaning "bone" or "skeleton"?

There are many borrowed words from Greek and Latin that are used as prefixes in English. Examples: pyro- relating to fire, hydro- relating to water, geo- relating to the earth etc. What is the ...
-1 votes
1 answer
184 views

Opposite prefix for 'ethno-'

Is there one? A cursory Google search yielded none. My best guess would be something close to exic-; not that I can think of any relevant words in this context using that.
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Numeral prefixes of tidal constituents [closed]

If tidal constituents with frequencies of one, two, three, and four cycles per day (respectively, periods of one, a half, a third, and a fourth of a day) were to be termed systematically based on ...
44 votes
11 answers
13k views

Why is the 'anti' in 'anti-semitism'?

If 'ageism' is the prejudice or discrimination against aged persons, 'sexism' discrimination against a person's sex and 'racism' discrimination against someone's race, then why is not Semitism the ...
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2 votes
1 answer
875 views

Is "aggr-" a prefix and what does it mean? [closed]

I'm not sure if "aggr-" is a prefix but I can see some words starting with it. like: Aggregate Aggressive Aggravate Aggrieve Aggrandize I'm here to ask if it has some meanings or they are all ...
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Distinction between prefixes 'super-' and 'extra-' in similar contexts

From my understanding, both the prefixes super- and extra- can mean above or beyond, though a possible distinction could be as follows (from the answer to this question): ...using super-something ...
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1 answer
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Is the "en-" verb prefix redundant? [closed]

The verb prefix en- seems redundant to me. For example a book titled 'Something' a book entitled 'Something' Are these identical in meaning, or is there some nuance?
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1 answer
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inter- prefix means between but interact has a whole different meaning than -inter or act, why is that?

I just started to dig into suffixes and prefixes. But I couldn't understand how do they exactly change the meaning of the word that they are appended. For example re- means again, retake means take ...
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11 votes
3 answers
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What does "autolyco-sentimental" mean?

Wagner is said to have described Mayerbeer's operas as follows: (translated into English and originally written in German, probably.) "Meyerbeer ... wanted a monstrous, piebald, historico-romantic, ...
0 votes
1 answer
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How to use two prefixes "comma" "and" stem in two situations [duplicate]

My native language is Dutch. We have a subtle, but useful way of combining the ingredients: Prefix (+ comma) + and + Prefix + stem. However, I do not know whether the same rules apply in the English ...
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4 answers
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How to hyphenate "non self destructive"?

Non self-destructive Non-self destructive Non-self-destructive Which one is correct?
9 votes
1 answer
13k views

Pre-requisite vs prerequisite

Looking up this on English exchange I couldn't seem to find a single source of truth: Instance 1 - "Prerequisite" in search: "Prerequisite for" vs. "prerequisite to" ...
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4 votes
1 answer
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Is "pre-prepared" redundant?

I've noticed recently the "word" pre-prepared popping up in my daily life, and if my completely selection-biased anecdotes are any evidence, it seems to be catching on. Is there any reason why the '...
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3 votes
1 answer
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Which one is the original prefix: con-, com-, or cor-?

Which one is the original prefix: con-, com-, or cor-? And which ones are variants?
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2 answers
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Transcription and pronunciation of the 'un-' prefix in General American English

What's the correct transcription and pronunciation of the 'un-' prefix in General American English? Cambridge Online dictionary provides the following transcription: /ʌn/ It's the same in words with ...
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1 answer
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Water is to hydro as wind is to?

What is the generic name or collective adjective for things associated with wind and wind-generated electricity ? solar, hydro, anemoi?
0 votes
2 answers
516 views

What did Colbert mean by “bedude form"?

In his most recent monologue on The Late Show, the comedian host Stephen Colbert, gently mocked a New York Times reporter's style of writing (watch the excerpt on YouTube) “500 words” she whispered,...
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