Questions tagged [attributive-nouns]

An attributive noun, also called a noun adjunct, refers to a noun placed before another noun to modify it, like "dog" in "dog catcher" and "dog food", "heart" in "heart surgery", "running" in "running shoes", "employee" in "employee compensation", and "Peter" in "Peter Principle". It is an alternative to a prepositional phrase, like "food for dogs" or "surgery of the heart". You can use a predicate test to distinguish a noun adjunct from an adjective.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0 votes
0 answers
19 views

Attributive nouns in science [duplicate]

I see more and more articles in scientific journals, where attributive nouns use plural. To me they sound really strange and non-intuitive. 'materials science' 'materials design' To me they should be '...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
9 views

Rule for "choice set" vs "choices set"? [duplicate]

To mean "a set of choices", what is correct in standard written English: "choice set" or "choices set"? I see both forms used. Sometimes, even in the same paragraph. ...
user avatar
  • 101
1 vote
1 answer
37 views

Can an attributive noun add identity to a noun phrase? [closed]

I'm in the process of writing documentation. I'm making use of attributive nouns to describe business-specific concepts and entities. There's one entity in particular which I'm currently referring to ...
user avatar
  • 119
0 votes
1 answer
35 views

Is there a word that describes something that wasn't made for how it's being used? [duplicate]

In other words, what adjective could you use to describe something that is being used for a task it wasn't made for. An example might include using a plastic bottle of water to water a plant; yes it ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
45 views

Using room twice

I have a game where an external character can use a room. There is a room known as “War Room”. When the character used the room, like any other, a log will be produced that states “Fred has used the ...
user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
37 views

Article after 'added' or 'implemented' in software changelogs [closed]

I'm writing a document describing what has been added or changed in a new version of a software app. Among the changes are new features allowing the users to do certain things. (1) Is it correct to ...
user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
79 views

Does capitalisation change when a word moves from proper noun to adjective?

For the sake of this question I'll use the word Linux as an example, but I really want to ask about the principle generally. The word Linux started as the name of an operating system kernel written by ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
31 views

Must attributive nouns always be singular in form? [duplicate]

I want to speak in English that I have a list with car names. Should I say "cars list" or "car list"? What if I have more than one attributive noun. Should all be singular? For ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
45 views

Noun adjuncts or complements? [duplicate]

I asked a question regarding PP complements the other day and I believe I now have a better handle on that. But I am still scratching my head over this paragraph from CGEL: Within the category of ...
user avatar
  • 1,065
0 votes
0 answers
28 views

A correct use of the word "exchange"

Let's say I develop an internet site where producers can sell and consumers can buy flowers. I prefer to think of it as an exchange. From the point of view of native English speakers, which domain ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
110 views

Can we use "depot" as an adjective? [closed]

Can we use depot in this form: depotted books or depot books? (I’m not sure about the past participle of this word.) Or should it be used only as a “place” where books are supposed to be stored, a ...
user avatar
  • 29
0 votes
1 answer
73 views

Can you say "paint price" instead of "painting price"?

Is this sentence ok as currently written? The paint price is high. I ask because the free online proofreading service from Grammarly, Inc. tries to change that sentence to The painting price is high,...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
125 views

How to refer to multiple entities that belong to multiple entities correctly?

So, for example, there are multiple books by multiple authors, and I want to talk about them. Is it correct to write "books authors"? Because "book authors" sounds like authors of ...
user avatar
  • 113
0 votes
1 answer
80 views

What is the best way to write a plural of a plural? [duplicate]

What started out as programming has turned into a curious language/grammar question. I'm writing a program and want to clearly specify a variable name. The variable will be a dictionary and each item ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
36 views

month as an adjective [duplicate]

For the sentence, "I am going on a two month cruise", would "two month" be considered an adjective since it means two months long. Also, is the correct wording "two months&...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
64 views

Why the “which is” can be omitted?

I am writing a scientific paper. And I wrote the sentence as follows: The nominal prepreg tow height is about 0.15~0.20mm, which is much larger than the Resolution Z-axis (0.011mm). Furthermore, the ...
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
69 views

"Back to school" as an adjective or noun

What would be a good noun to call a person who deliberately, willfully makes a "back to school" trip to get a refresher on a subject (like geometry, calculus, biology)? Humorous nouns and ...
user avatar
  • 335
0 votes
0 answers
28 views

Using "test" after TOEIC and TOEFL [duplicate]

Recently, I've seen a few examples of people writing either "I took the TOEIC test" or "I took the TOEFL test". They tend to be ESL students, so I don't want to be a grammar Nazi about it, but for my ...
user avatar
  • 149
1 vote
0 answers
68 views

Nominal form or adjectival form?

Given that the adjectival form of wood is wooden, why has wood been used instead of wooden in the following sentence? It is a spacious house with wood floor.
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
43 views

A woman with two children came. Is "with two children" an attribute or an adverbial modifier?

I'm not sure what the phrase “with two children” is doing here. Is it describing "a woman" or "came" or this make sense both way.
user avatar
  • 35
0 votes
1 answer
449 views

users´ needs or users needs

Which one of the following is right/ better. I am still not sure after thinking about it for quite a while now. I am talking about the needs of multiple users. The first option (s´) is used when ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
68 views

Adjective VS Noun as an adjective

I am often confused when it comes to a noun that is often used as an attributive adjective, yet this noun has an adjective form and this adjective form is described as "relating to (the noun)" by any ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
458 views

What grammatical role is "blood" playing in the phrase "blood red"?

"Blood red" can be both a noun and an adjective: Blood red is my favourite colour. [noun] The wall was blood red. [adjective] The "blood" is optional in the sense it can be ...
user avatar
  • 1,501
1 vote
8 answers
191 views

Attribute to describe about doing something smartly with clear direction [closed]

When I research about wolves, I found that they have a very interesting attribute: they always do things (hunting, "trekking", caring...) with a well-planned & clear direction/strategy and do ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
63 views

What is the difference between rebellion attempt and attempted rebellion? [closed]

I want to understand if there is any difference between "rebellion attempt" and "attempted rebellion". The first is a noun-noun while the second is an adjective noun. I think both are ok, but I do ...
user avatar
  • 111
28 votes
9 answers
13k views

Why are they 'nude photos'? [duplicate]

Recent news events in the US have resulted in many headlines about "nude photos of young women" and variations. Obviously it's the women who are nude, not the photos, so why does this phrasing ...
user avatar
  • 11k
-1 votes
1 answer
96 views

Is '"snapshotting" a correct word? [closed]

For example, as part of the information message of some computer script: Snapshotting the file... Can we write snapshotting instead of taking the snapshot? Is it still correct? I've found an ...
user avatar
  • 673
1 vote
1 answer
59 views

Is “U.S.” in “U.S.-China trade” a noun or adjective?

In the work I am writing, I am using “United States” for noun and “U.S.” for adjective. I was a bit confused whether the U.S. in the phrase U.S.-China trade is a noun or adjective. I didn’t get ...
user avatar
  • 715
1 vote
1 answer
63 views

how to justify the "rough and tumble" used in this sentence?

Our clothing is designed to take the greater "rough and tumble" that they expect boys to give it. This is clearly an attributive clause. What baffles me is that the "it" used in the end. If " rough ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
80 views

A and B which, which stands for which?

There are numerous small animals like field mice and voles which you do not see. In the above sentence, how do you determine if which modifies voles or field mice and voles?
user avatar
  • 83
1 vote
1 answer
62 views

Question on attributive nouns/noun adjuncts

I am writing a review in English and I need to use the structure ‘eye movement changes’, ‘eye movement abnormalities’ with ‘eye movements’ in the form of a noun adjunct. Even in the title I would need ...
user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
90 views

Why is it incorrect to say/write "I want to know today weather" instead of "I want to know today's weather"? [closed]

"'s" indicates possesive case. Although it's absurd to say that "today" owns "weather", possesive case can indicate other relationships too. For example, in "Picasso's paintings" it means "by Picasso" ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
161 views

Is it "invisible coat" or "invisibility coat"?

I’ve taken a test, and I’d like to know the answer to a question: Complete the sentence using the correct word; make any changes necessary. I would like to have an _______ coat so nobody can see me. ...
user avatar
  • 101
6 votes
3 answers
1k views

"Fish and chips shop" or "fish and chip shop"?

When referring to a restaurant specializing in fish and chips would you call it a fish and chip shop or a fish and chips shop?
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
241 views

What part of speech is the word hair in 'hair spray'? [duplicate]

Consider the following sentence as an example. I used some hair spray. What part of speech is hair? Intuitively, I want to say it's an adjective modifying spray since hair spray is two separate words ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
80 views

Adjective of low-toxicity

Is there an adjective for low-toxicity, or can it be used as an adjective itself? It sounds strange to say, for example, materials that are low-toxicity.
user avatar
4 votes
5 answers
380 views

Why do we say "acid rain" and not "acidic rain"?

The term "acid rain" refers to rainwater that are more acidic than regular rainwater. So if acidity is a property of the water, why do we say 'acid' and not 'acidic'?
user avatar
  • 231
6 votes
2 answers
395 views

Rescue dogs vs rescued dogs

Why is a dog that has been saved from the pound called a rescue dog instead of a rescued dog?
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
229 views

"Pants-changing" versus "diaper(s)-changing"

Perhaps the same goes for nappy versus nappies. Since when one is changing one of these, there are two involved. But, is the plural more along the lines of pants and shorts? Does anybody out there ...
user avatar
  • 189
3 votes
1 answer
167 views

What "of" should I replace with Saxon genitives? Avoiding too many "of"

I'm trying to write a short scientific article and ended up with this sentence: Now we show the result of the analysis of the sequences of events with the data from the study. As you can see there ...
user avatar
  • 183
0 votes
1 answer
104 views

Countable Attributive nouns in plural context

There are a lot of topics about this question. All of them explain the form (plural, singular) of the attributive noun coupled with a main noun in the singular form, for example: ladies room ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
128 views

"English origin person" vs. "Person of English origin"

Is it correct to say: He is an English origin person Rather than: He is a person of English origin I am looking for a short way to differentiate between persons of English origin, as opposed ...
user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
197 views

What word would work as a better substitute for "Stalker"?

Context I am working on a game and one of the Classes in it is "Rogue". (Original, I know.) I'm trying to find a term that accurately describes and can serve as a name for one of the ...
user avatar
9 votes
6 answers
10k views

What do you call a person who loves to run? [closed]

If we follow the pattern of 'cat lover', is it correct to say 'run lover'? If I use Google translator to Spanish (my mother tongue), 'run lover' sounds more like a shout you'd say to your lover to ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
123 views

Adjective preceding attributive nouns

When an adjective is preceding two nouns, the first one being an attributive noun, does it define the final noun or the attributive noun? For example: Red car keys Are they red keys that open a car, ...
user avatar
  • 113
0 votes
1 answer
188 views

Should I use the possessive apostrophe or an attribute noun on a business card?

I have designed some stationary items (such as letterhead and business card) for a website/brand (XYZ.Com for instance), and I need help to choose the correct sentence among those below: The ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
2k views

Parking sign apostrophe? [duplicate]

Should there be an apostrophe in the sign "residents parking". A quick Google search suggests there shouldn't. But why not? Is "residents" an adjective?
user avatar
  • 493
1 vote
1 answer
38 views

Order of Adjectives: "quantitative reverse transcription…" vs. "reverse transcription quantitative…" [duplicate]

This is a general question with no specific sentence in mind. If a string of 2 or 3 attributive adjectives (or attributive nouns?) are used in a sentence, they generally follow a particular order (e.g....
user avatar
  • 715
0 votes
1 answer
450 views

Do I use the singular or plural form of a noun when describing an attribute of a plural noun? [duplicate]

Take these two sentences for example: This is to compensate for the fluctuating character length in the sentence. vs. This is to compensate for the fluctuating characters length in the sentence....
user avatar
  • 127
0 votes
2 answers
55 views

“Incur companies multimillion dollar losses”

I am struggling to formulate the following sentence Bad decisions lead to bad results, that would incur companies millions dollars losses. What I want to say is that bad decisions will lead to ...
user avatar