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Questions tagged [attributive-nouns]

An attributive noun, also called a noun adjunct, refers to a noun placed before another noun to modify it, like "dog" in "dog catcher" and "dog food", "heart" in "heart surgery", "running" in "running shoes", "employee" in "employee compensation", and "Peter" in "Peter Principle". It is an alternative to a prepositional phrase, like "food for dogs" or "surgery of the heart". You can use a predicate test to distinguish a noun adjunct from an adjective.

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Noun adjunct with 'beginning'

Can noun adjunct be used with the word 'beginning'? In the following phrases, for example: event beginning, play beginning, month beginning, beautiful friendship beginning These examples sound off ...
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“Fish and chips shop” or “fish and chip shop”?

When referring to a restaurant specializing in fish and chips would you call it a fish and chip shop or a fish and chips shop?
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What part of speech is the word hair in 'hair spray'? [duplicate]

Consider the following sentence as an example. I used some hair spray. What part of speech is hair? Intuitively, I want to say it's an adjective modifying spray since hair spray is two separate words ...
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Adjective of low-toxicity

Is there an adjective for low-toxicity, or can it be used as an adjective itself? It sounds strange to say, for example, materials that are low-toxicity.
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Why do we say “acid rain” and not “acidic rain”?

The term "acid rain" refers to rainwater that are more acidic than regular rainwater. So if acidity is a property of the water, why do we say 'acid' and not 'acidic'?
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Rescue dogs vs rescued dogs

Why is a dog that has been saved from the pound called a rescue dog instead of a rescued dog?
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“Pants-changing” versus “diaper(s)-changing”

Perhaps the same goes for nappy versus nappies. Since when one is changing one of these, there are two involved. But, is the plural more along the lines of pants and shorts? Does anybody out there ...
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1answer
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What “of” should I replace with Saxon genitives? Avoiding too many “of”

I'm trying to write a short scientific article and ended up with this sentence: Now we show the result of the analysis of the sequences of events with the data from the study. As you can see there ...
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Countable Attributive nouns in plural context

There are a lot of topics about this question. All of them explain the form (plural, singular) of the attributive noun coupled with a main noun in the singular form, for example: ladies room ...
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“English origin person” vs. “Person of English origin”

Is it correct to say: He is an English origin person Rather than: He is a person of English origin I am looking for a short way to differentiate between persons of English origin, as opposed ...
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3answers
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What word would work as a better substitute for “Stalker”?

Context I am working on a game and one of the Classes in it is "Rogue". (Original, I know.) I'm trying to find a term that accurately describes and can serve as a name for one of the Subclasses. (...
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What do you call a person who loves to run? [closed]

If we follow the pattern of 'cat lover', is it correct to say 'run lover'? If I use Google translator to Spanish (my mother tongue), 'run lover' sounds more like a shout you'd say to your lover to ...
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Adjective preceding attributive nouns

When an adjective is preceding two nouns, the first one being an attributive noun, does it define the final noun or the attributive noun? For example: Red car keys Are they red keys that open a car, ...
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Should I use the possessive apostrophe or an attribute noun on a business card?

I have designed some stationary items (such as letterhead and business card) for a website/brand (XYZ.Com for instance), and I need help to choose the correct sentence among those below: The ...
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1answer
113 views

Parking sign apostrophe? [duplicate]

Should there be an apostrophe in the sign "residents parking". A quick Google search suggests there shouldn't. But why not? Is "residents" an adjective?
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1answer
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Order of Adjectives: “quantitative reverse transcription…” vs. “reverse transcription quantitative…” [duplicate]

This is a general question with no specific sentence in mind. If a string of 2 or 3 attributive adjectives (or attributive nouns?) are used in a sentence, they generally follow a particular order (e.g....
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Do I use the singular or plural form of a noun when describing an attribute of a plural noun? [duplicate]

Take these two sentences for example: This is to compensate for the fluctuating character length in the sentence. vs. This is to compensate for the fluctuating characters length in the sentence....
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“Incur companies multimillion dollar losses”

I am struggling to formulate the following sentence Bad decisions lead to bad results, that would incur companies millions dollars losses. What I want to say is that bad decisions will lead to ...
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Can a noun work as an adjective, and the adjective as a noun?

Hazel Eyes I found the following paragraph in the guycounseling.com blog article “Hazel Eyes: Learn Why People with Greenish Eye Color are Rare!”, containing the two words “hazel eyes”: Hazel eyes ...
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noun adjuncts and adjectives?

Can a noun adjunct be considered as an adjective in any case? The answer to the following question - Is this noun used as an adjective? - barely gives me an answer.
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Should “words” be plural in “The Words Hunters”? [closed]

I'm creating an educational game that teaches English words and I wanted to call it: "The Word Hunter". But there's a famous book named Word Hunters and I don't want to have any copyright problem so I ...
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1answer
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Are there nouns that undergo no change when used in the possessive (Saxon genitive)?

I’m looking for the existence of English nouns (common or proper) that undergo no change when used in their possessive (Saxon genitive) form, i.e. that do not take the usual ’s appendage the way radio’...
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Functions of adjectives

It was cloudy this morning. The word cloudy in this sentence is for sure an adjective. However, what is its syntactic function? is it an: object complement adjective or a predicate ...
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1answer
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What does 'back up with' mean? [closed]

The expression comes from the following meme of Stevie Wonder How I feel while backing up with 5% window tint I think it's some kind of insulting the blinds. I don't enjoy those things, but the ...
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Is it “static calculator” or “statics calculator”?

I'm about to create a web servlet to calculate some physical properties of an object. In German I'll call it 'Statikrechner' which means it calculates values in the field of statics (stability of a ...
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2answers
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Difference between “higher education level” and “higher educational level”?

I was doing my geography homework when I came across a grammar problem. I don’t know whether to use a noun or an adjective in the blank: This neighbourhood provides a local labour supply with a ...
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3answers
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A Latin word that is like the word “trinity” but for “five fold” or “five as one”

I read that the word "trinity", a Latin based word, literally translates as "three fold" or more specifically "three as one". That being the case, what Latin based word would I use to express, "five ...
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Could the attributive noun be plural? [duplicate]

Last year, the United Nations security council adopted four sanctions solutions seeking to deprive North Korea of key sources... I was taught that “attributive noun” can only be in a single form not ...
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4answers
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There's a product described as “Omaha Steaks Burgers” is this proper English? [closed]

There is a commercial that has the description, Omaha Steaks Burgers, it drives me crazy. It sounds wrong, when I read it, it looks wrong. It seems improper to me. Old-fashioned burgers just ...
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0answers
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What does herald in “a herald introduction” mean?

Lately, I've come across a phrase which I do not fully understand. I found it in a pdf document devoted to various reading comprehension tests. The text can be found in here. Title of the passage: ...
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3answers
150 views

Can you use “return” with noun adjuncts?

My friend used a phrase "the dark side return" meaning "the return of the dark side". I have a feeling native speakers would never put it that way, but can't articulate my position. Is that true? Can ...
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141 views

An indefinite article in front of an adjective without a noun

I've written a sentence that goes "The sky dimmed as the sun fired an emerald beam salute and sank into the far crest of the earth splashing gleams that stained the overhanging firmament a blacklight ...
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3answers
783 views

What does “consequence-free chance” mean?

I read this sentence on TIME (Oct.23 2017), Having announced that he will retire at the end of 2018, Corker, once a key Trump ally, could emerge as a leading check on some of the President’s worst ...
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Can “Almond Milk” Be an Adjective? [duplicate]

When one orders an "almond milk latte," can "almond milk" be considered an adjective?
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2answers
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'The snap election results' or 'The snap-election results'? [closed]

Which of the two is grammatically correct? The snap election results are in. The snap-election results are in. The sentence should refer to the results of an election that was announced suddenly and ...
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1answer
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Does the order of the atributes matter when describing an object? [duplicate]

Suppose the following The horse is big, white and heavy. Does the meaning of the noun change when the order of the atributes of an object change (in this case a horse)? Are there any exceptions? ...
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1answer
152 views

On the idiomaticity of attributive proper nouns, proper adjectives, and either singular or plural possessives when describing Imperial Possessions [closed]

When talking about something which is owed by an empire or is considered to be a part of that empire, which of the many ways to express this relationship are most commonly used and generally accepted ...
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2answers
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Is the noun “device” correctly used as a modifier in the phrase “the device box”?

For example, "the instruction manual can be found in the device's box". "Device's" doesn't sound right to me, so I thought of using: "the instruction manual can be found in the device box". Is it ...
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1answer
886 views

Should “children” or “children's” be used in “London's children('s) and family portrait photographer”? [closed]

"London's children and family portrait photographer" or "London's children's and family portrait photographer"? Any help gratefully appreciated
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1answer
147 views

Inconsistency regarding plural: why do we write “results file” but also “result list”?

How come it is ok to write "results file", while you must write "result list" rather than "results list"?
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1answer
59 views

Study vs Education as modifiers

Could you describe the difference in contexts/connotations for "Study" and "Education" as modifiers, particularly in "study programs" and "education programs" at the university - might be my question ...
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3answers
292 views

Noun Capitalization When Used With Common Nouns

I have come across a few written documents by my peers that have what I would call a proper noun grouped with a common noun. So as an example without any capitalization: Select the edit menu from ...
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1answer
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Wafer — New Adjective or Attributive Noun?

In The Guardian today, Andrew Rawnsley writes that the Prime Minister would have a wafer and volatile majority. On the assumption that "wafer" here is not simply a misprint for "wafer-thin", what do ...
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1answer
880 views

A verb used as an adjective used as a noun used as an adjective?

The Question: Is it acceptable to use a nominalized participle as an adjective? A participle is a verb form used as an adjective; examples include the running man and the caught ball, as well as (...
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1answer
396 views

Singular or plural after multiple noun adjuncts?

After a series of noun adjuncts (attributive nouns), do we use the singular or plural form of the common final noun? Example: The bank lends to companies in power, steel, and textile industry. The ...
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1answer
68 views

“state's secrets” vs. “state secrets” [closed]

Is it state's secrets or state secret? I am always confused when I try to put " 's " to things . I have read answers about use of the possessive apostrophe but I am not sure whether this should be: ...
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1answer
121 views

“Footsteps Sounds” or “Footstep Sounds”

I have a friend who wants to title his thesis "Footsteps Sounds". I don't think this sounds right but I can't explain why. To me it should be "Footstep Sounds". Are both correct with different ...
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1answer
126 views

Value of time vs time value [duplicate]

I want a compensation equal to the value of my time. I was told by a native speaker that this is the correct expression (instead of saying equal to my time value), but I don't know why. Could ...
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1answer
112 views

Why is the phrase “coal country” uncountable in this sentence? Does it mean a particular region?

Why is the phrase "coal country" uncountable in this sentence? Does it mean a particular region? Were he frustrated in Congress, the president would surely fall back on areas where he has a free ...
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Should it be “clotted cream scones” or “clotted-cream scones”? [duplicate]

I'm eating clotted cream-covered scones. or I'm eating clotted-cream-covered scones. or I'm eating clotted cream covered scones. Formally, I thought they'd have to be clotted-cream scones, ...