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1 vote

How to parse and punctuate the saying: "United we stand, divided we fall."

Yes; one might well expect the punctuation to be United, we stand; divided, we fall. But usage trumps normal conventions, and the rendering is almost always United we stand, divided we fall. '...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
0 votes

How to parse and punctuate the saying: "United we stand, divided we fall."

The choice is yours bumblebee! How you've written it seems fine to me ("United, we stand; divided, we fall.") – provided it's meant as one sentence with a big pause (for effect) in the ...
ness's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes

Is it correct to use "as quickly as he never had....."?

With {do something} as quickly as, both comparands must have a degree of quickness. Hence, "never had [done something]" is ungrammatical as complement there since a non-existent action ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 22k
0 votes

Is it correct to use "as quickly as he never had....."?

its grammatically incorrect. The problem lies in the double negative. "Never" is a negative word. "Had" is used in the past perfect tense, which implies something that happened ...
huo_zii's user avatar
0 votes

Ambiguity in prepositional phrases

I would like to say that I had been tortured by this ambiguity all the time. But I found that you could disambiguate like this. The exact meaning of the sentence depends on the meaning of "dishes&...
杨啸天's user avatar
3 votes

This is relating to a number of posts from a few years ago that I have just stumbled upon

food (n.) An item of food; a particular kind of food. Chiefly in plural. 1923 If she had knocked off starchy foods and done Swedish exercises for a bit, she might have been quite tolerable. P. G. ...
DjinTonic's user avatar
  • 22k
6 votes

This is relating to a number of posts from a few years ago that I have just stumbled upon

The claim that foods was never used in the UK is false. The Hansard Corpus, detailing speech in British parliament, has 9182 hits dating back to the 19th century. A sample: Our imports of foods of ...
DW256's user avatar
  • 9,509
1 vote

I’m confused by how the term “syntactic marker” is used in CGEL

Syntactic markers are serial graphemic elements that indicate syntactic features. These features create coherence within phrases and between words or word groups on the clause level. Syntactic ...
2 votes

I’m confused by how the term “syntactic marker” is used in CGEL

In the proverbial 25 words or less, a marker is a chunk of articulated sound that indicates a particular kind of grammatical function but is otherwise devoid of meaning. For example: -ed is the past ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 22k
1 vote

Can the verb 'last' ever be ditransitive?

The verb last is intransitive The answer is that no, the verb last is not ditransitive: just because you see two noun phrases following the verb, this does ɴᴏᴛ mean that both of them must be core ...
tchrist's user avatar
  • 136k
6 votes

Types of English where "try [bare infinitive]" is common? (e.g. I'll try work on it)

I (a native Standard Southern British English speaker) have never heard this from a native speaker of any dialect and would generally perceive it as a mistake. It certainly is not accepted in standard ...
Tristan's user avatar
  • 918
4 votes

"This" and "That" situation

Both are standard English. "This" refers to something close to hand, "That" refers to something more distant. "This" might be what I'm saying now, "that" might ...
digitig's user avatar
  • 628

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