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Yes. In hockey, an assist is scored as one point in the assisting player’s record. This is from the National Hockey League: When a player scores a goal, an “assist” shall be credited to the player or players taking part in the play immediately preceding the goal, but no more than two assists can be given on any goal. Each “assist” shall count one point in ...


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The context is ice hockey: And one sees: to get an assist or more formally, to be awarded an assist, to be credited with an assist. Assist USA Hockey Up to a maximum of two assists shall be awarded to those player(s) who had possession of the puck immediately prior to the goal being scored. National Hockey League You score a point when you shoot the ...


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In soccer, I think the usual verb is 'have'. 'V an assist' is relatively new. But there are almost 3½ million Google hits for "had three assists" and over 5 million for "had two assists", many obviously relevant, for instance. Here are, for comparison, various other verbs which are logical candidates found in raw Google data for "Ved ...


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For me, terror is something similar to a gnawing, escalating sensation of something really awful afoot or likely to happen. The word "dread" comes to mind and having just checked the Wikipedia article mentioned earlier in this thread, I now see that at least one reference supports this notion I have for this word. Horror, on the other hand, is ...


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I believe the most popular (and accepted) answer starts going in the right direction (thinking of what the act of "deregistering" does and the state transition), but then wrongly concludes "deregister" is redundant because the "unregistered" state is the same as what happens after "deregistering". If you really think ...


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Live /laɪv/ is an adjective, not a verb, regardless of the tense of the sentence where it occurs. So, you will be live? This uses the be + adjective construction. You can't omit be any more than you can omit it before any other adjective. For example, we say "The moon is bright tonight", "The moon will be bright tonight", "Will the ...


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Will you video conference with your colleague? This is an instance – a modern one – of verbing a noun, denominalization. It's entered the lexicon, whereas "live" as a verb in this sense hasn't. If it were to, it would derive from an adjective part of speech, the state of "being live". As an alternative, in some contexts people have ...


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I’m not sure that “appropriate” is generally used in the context you’re looking for but that is the first thing that came to mind.


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I believe this is correct usage, and not a typo. 'Depend' must agree with 'concepts' in plurality, which it does. You could not rearrange the sentence and say, 'Concepts depends on ___', you would have to write it, 'Concepts depend on ____'. I hope this makes sense.


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No, your reading of the sentence is correct; the subject of "depend" has to be 'orientation"; therefore an s is needed at the end of "depend".


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The word clone originally had a very specific scientific and technical meaning but now has an informal meaning defined by the Cambridge online dictionary as: someone or something that looks very much like someone or something else: with the example : Most people saw her as just another blond-haired, red-lipped Marilyn Monroe clone. You could, therefore ...


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Especially in the context of theater, we can say methodize. As Wordhippo defines it, methodize is: To perform a theatrical role in accordance with the principles of method acting. Where method acting is defined as: An acting technique in which the actor fully immerses themselves into the character they are playing. or, in Merriam Webster: capitalized: a ...


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emulate or impersonate. emulate: to copy something achieved by someone else and try to do it as well as they have. impersonate: to intentionally copy another person's characteristics, such as their behavior, speech, appearance, or expressions, especially to make people laugh. source - Cambridge Dictionary hope this helps you.


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Assuming you mean immediately after "there is" or "there are," no verb can grammatically be used in that position.


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B) I will be traveling and eating on Monday and Tuesday. The construction that you want is: On Monday and Tuesday, I will be traveling and eating. A fronting adverbial is a free modifier and modifies the entire clause (or clauses where there is more than one equal clause.)


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That is a rather odd use of the word "curate" in the verb form, as their particular usage may change what they intended the sentence to mean. I doubt that they meant to imply that the publisher has great power over the market and actively controls it, rather than merely participates and contributes to it. Also, the definitions that you found for &...


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There are a couple of ways to interpret the form here: Be-perfect - an archaic version of the perfect aspect that uses a form of to be instead of to have. Stative verb and participle - basically, interpreting meet as a past participle describing the state of the participants. Be-Perfect English today forms the perfect aspect with the auxiliary verb to ...


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In a comment, John Lawler wrote: To smoke is a purpose infinitive. Stop, unlike start, can take only gerund complements (He stopped smoking, he started smoking, he started to smoke), so any infinitive following it has to be an adjunct.


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IMO, "to smoke" should be a direct object of "stopped" which is derived from a noun clause "that he will/would smoke".


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As you will tell from my answers, I like to focus on readability. At the satisfaction of my readers. Always imagining that they could give me a star rating based on the enjoyment of my book or sentence. So for me, I think you need to clarify for the reader what you're trying to say. Are you just missing a comma? as in, "he stopped, to smoke." an ...


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To use equal as a verb, consider two examples of the many dictionary definitions: equal (verb) = to have the same value, size, etc as something else, often shown using a symbol (=): "Two plus two equals four." Cambridge equal: transitive verb to be equal to especially : to be identical in value to Merriam Webster Hence we say "2+2 equals 4&...


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I think 'nodding' will have to be taken to mean both up and down motion of the chin - that would solve the problem temporarily, until someone coins a word to describe exactly that gesture of pointing with one's chin. Chin-pointing is, I feel, a clumsy compound word and can itself be subjected to further hair-splitting as 'pointing' is generally assumed to be ...


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It is black vernacular in America. I think it refers to smiling at someone when they're a clueless dipshit and you just tolerate it for the duration of the interchange. It could also refer to the smile of the shoe-shine toward his customers, but that's a much earlier reference. It could be the root. It basically is about a power interchange with a racist or ...


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Yes, intrine, though don't expect most people to know it. English provides a lot of options for grouping more than two items: group, combine, match, assemble, bring together. Whereas a pair has a lot of specific associations in English (couples, card games, chromosomes, body parts), trios are rarer, and bringing three items together (rather than two or four) ...


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You can use the verb to match: meaning: to harmonize with: the jacket matched the pants and the shirt.


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For example think that there are 10 levels and you are at level 1. If you update a file it will reach directly to level 10 from level1(up to date) If you upgrade it from level 1 you can reach only level 2 (i.e. step by step )


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I just had the same experience and I always forget the word, but I think “Sublime” describes nature of this kind perfectly. Here is the definition: “of such excellence, grandeur, or beauty as to inspire great admiration or awe”.


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