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This might be a stretch but I hear there's no rules in poetry. Still I'd invite your opinion. "Embark to envelope mind's eye emancipation" Your thoughts, suggestions, and constructive criticism is welcomed


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I have a couple of ideas. Maybe this use of simple present is a question of style and tone. News reports tend to use the present simple in headlines, for example. From the Guardian today: Andy Burnham calls for vote to 'break impasse' Locked down Leicester teeters on the brink of despair. Greater Manchester running out of hospital beds, leak reveals. However,...


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The present perfect continuous (even though it is, grammatically, the continuous form) refers to a series of interrupted occurrences. If you have had the same idea more or less constantly in an unaltered form in your mind for a period of time you use the simple past tense "I have had this idea for some time". If, however, you have had multiple ...


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The short answer to your question is never. Articles are elements of noun phrases, not of verb phrases. Therefore they cannot be used with verbs, only with nouns. This gizmo is responsible for opening the door. This gizmo is responsible for the opening of the door. In sentence (1), you have a verb phrase so you do not use an article. You know it is a verb ...


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In this case turn about does not mean turn and face in the opposite direction it means circle around the point mentioned, in this specific case the person's calling or vocation. You can tell this from the comparison with a potter's wheel This is probably the origin of the term turn about meaning turn and face in the opposite direction as that means turn ...


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All three terms are used but they are used in different contexts. For example if you are talking about a variable which is defined as a constant or is an initial condition whose value is determined by the environment before the discussion starts we would say something like "C has the value 10" If on the other hand we were talking about a set of ...


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Help licenses an infinitival (with or without to) as its complement. The first version is grammatical, but the second, with a gerund-participial as the complement of help, is questionable. In your case, solve the problem functions as the complement of help.


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In the first question "is" is strictly correct, the subject (team) being in the singular. This rule is less observed than it was and may feel somewhat formal now. Only the team with the lowest service ratings is referred to training with human resources. (I'm surprised to see "human resources" used in 1972 when "personnel" was ...


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I believe your analysis to be correct for all three. I need not repeat all the definitions in the Cambridge dictionary but through has the connotations that you suggest. Cambridge dictionary I suspect the compilers of the questions were testing for understanding of the difference between through and throughout. Throughout = in every part, or during the whole ...


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According to Merriam-Webster, you can use wake as an intransitive verb: 1 a : to be or remain awake 'He wakes' would be antonymous to 'He sleeps' and an active version of 'He is awake'. However, I've never heard it being used this way (contrary to definitions 1b, 1c and 2), and I'm not a native speaker, so I can't really comment on how it feels.


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a rented house a confused/bored child Your mistake is in assuming that "rented" is an adjective here. It isn't; it's a verb. Compare "rented" to "confused" and "bored" [1] "Rented" can't be modified by "very", but "confused/bored" can: we can say "a very confused/bored child", ...


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ow about strident? From Lexico: strident: Loud and harsh; grating; ‘his voice had become increasingly sharp, almost strident’ Your example: Jane yelled back in a strident voice. Strident certainly captures loud prompted by anger, frustration, and impatience.


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Some suggestions: An irate voice An exasperated voice An apoplectic voice A seething voice An incensed voice An indignant voice A rankled voice An infuriated voice A vexed voice An ireful voice


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I would suggest regulated. A "regulation" is A rule of order having the force of law, prescribed by a superior or competent authority, relating to the actions of those under the authority's control. https://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Government+regulation (googling "regulated sexuality" comes up with lots of relevant hits ......


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Anywho, to answer your question, Bob, I believe it is, it would be much simpler to rephrase/reconstruct your sentence and instead say, "I went to the store because I ran out of milk." This flows much more easily. I agree with what the comment above me says as well. You may say "is that", although I HATE the word "that", but you ...


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Welcome to the forum, Simba. "She said she strongly believed that Charity had begun smoking in the previous month." Yes, I think you should use the past perfect here, as the embedded clause refers to a past prior to the one referred to in the main clause.


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It's common to use past tense in conditional clauses. "if he fell asleep" is equivalent in meaning to "if he were to fall asleep". It's not ambiguous because the tense of the main clause makes it clear whether you're talking about the past or future. If you say I would have taken a shot if he fell asleep. it's clear that you mean the ...


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I don't think there's any significant difference in meaning. But skulk is a lot less common today, as that linked NGram chart shows, so unless you specifically want that "dated" association, I'd stick with sneak. There are some syntactic differences, though. Per this chart, both past tense verb forms commonly occur in, for example, he sneaked / ...


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As pointed out in your dictionary: To sneak means to move in a certain manner. To skulk means to hide in a certain manner. Examples John saw Mary sneaking through the bushes. (Mary is moving) John saw Mary skulking in the bushes. (Mary is hiding)


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An extract from the previous paragraph. Holmes is speaking to Watson: "At least I have got a grip of the essential facts of the case. I shall enumerate them to you, for nothing clears up a case so much as stating it to another person [...]." Holmes is enumerating a number of points. Perhaps he accompanies the successive points by putting ...


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If all you are doing is expressing the theory in some specified fixed-dimensional domain, you can say "the theory resolves to or particularizes to X in three dimensions" (since you aren't really doing anything to change the theory or its strengths and weaknesses.) But if you are able to exploit the theory in special ways in this domain, and you ...


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"Restrict" is in common usage in the mathematical literature for some of the situations you describe. For example, "We restrict consideration of the theorem to three dimensions".


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