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Try predominate: to be the largest in number or the most important (Cambridge) But I personally would go for a phrase made of two words: take precedence to be more important (than something else) When it comes to making health care decisions, the patient's preference should take precedence. (M-W) So your sentence would be: ... in both of which ...


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The phone bobbled in her hand, before falling to the ground. bobble (v) 1: BOB 2: FUMBLE m-w North American [with object] Mishandle (a ball) Lexico To juggle or fumble (a batted or thrown baseball) momentarily, usually resulting in an error. dictionary.com To drop or almost drop a ball that you are trying to catch or stop Cambridge Edmund's hand ...


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You are correct: the verb italicize is limited to printing in italics. (Curiously, non-italic typeface is referred to as Roman). Cursive, while also slanted, is characterized by connected letters. The more general verb is Italianize (v.) Transitive. To make Italian in character or style. She Italianised her Christian name. The Hall was new wainscoted and ...


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We need a hike IN productivity. We need to step up productivity (a step-up in productivity). "Goose" is a problematic word because it calls to mind pinching someone's bottom: unintended connotative association. Saying that "we need some waxing" sounds sort of ridiculous for anyone who reads books. It's the wrong connotation entirely. ...


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"14 Registered Students" indicates that there are 14 registered students. This would be the subject of a sentence, for example, "There are 14 registered students in the class." This usage is more static and does not show action. "14 Students Registered" gives a slightly different meaning: In this case you are using registered as ...


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The charity gave them money [to help them [purchase a house]]. If there's only one object in a clause it is always a direct object. In this example the matrix clause (the whole sentence) has "money" as direct object and "them" as indirect object. The embedded subordinate clause (in outer brackets) is an adjunct and has "them" ...


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The conjugation of the verb 'Show' is : "show -- showed -- showed / shown". [The oId & archaic spelling of 'show' is *'shew'. Its conjugation is : "shew / shewed / shewed or shewn".] The past participle "showed" is very rare. It may be used in mediocre A.E. active construction; but it should NOT be used as per standard B.E. ...


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Yes, it's a sentence fragment because it's missing a subject, verb, or both. Yes, "have" is a verb, but yes, it's a "to-infinitive" and is not the main verb of the sentence, so its conjugation doesn't have a bearing on the question. Is that a problem? Not necessarily. The context is informal and the meaning is understood. The implied ...


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As EL&U participant Walter Mitty points out in a comment beneath the poster's question, a more common idiomatic way of expressing the same idea today is "keep your eyes peeled [for something]." Christine Ammer, The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms, second edition (2013) mentions both "eyes skinned" and "eyes peeled" in ...


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One common enough use of this verb in scientific literature is the following, where mostly "explanation" is concerned, the addition of ideas is not a constructive addition but an addition of known facts that haven't yet been mentioned. (OALD) idea/story/musical theme ​[transitive] develop something to add further explanation or details to an idea, ...


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Have a look at this definition: 4a: to cause to evolve or unfold gradually : to lead or conduct (something) through a succession of states or changes each of which is preparatory for the next /developed his argument From here Unlike cover, which is straight forward and just means include, talk about, develop carries the idea of gradually building up from ...


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Scrambling is a verb meaning to climb over boulders or rough ground. It's like "climbing, but not as vertical", if you know what I mean, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scramble has it as: 1: the act or an instance of scrambling: such as a: the act of moving or climbing over something quickly especially on all fours, eg "scramble ...


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Both ways are okay, it depends on the context you are using it. "fill in" is more suitable for casual communication, in fact, you can also use "fill out" for the very same meaning. So, I would go with one of these two ways: Fill in the text fields. or Fill out the text fields.


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I am reluctant to answer on such an old post, I seldom take joy in raising things of this nature from the dead; however, I stumbled upon it and I suppose it's still relevant. A lot of words are passable for this scenario: input, enter, fill, insert, etc. "Input user credentials" "Enter username and password" "Fill in the required ...


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