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Is "Illegal dumping" a gerund or a noun? What about "occasional flooding"?

Illegal dumping of refuse into drainage can pollute surface water or cause occasional flooding. Dumping and flooding are nouns in this example. Gerunds are modified by adverbs: Carelessly painting ...
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-1 votes

Is "Illegal dumping" a gerund or a noun? What about "occasional flooding"?

You are basically correct. A gerund is a nominal form of a verb. People usually give its part of speech as "verb", not "noun". Like other nominals, it can function as a subject, ...
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2 votes

Are "close" and "open" verbs or adjectives?

Close (pronounced /kloz/, the same as clothes) and open are verbs, or at least can be used as verbs in many constructions. The word also spelled close but pronounced /klos/ is an adjective, often ...
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3 votes
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Are "close" and "open" verbs or adjectives?

"The door is open" indicates that someone may go through. An adjective. "The door is opened" This is better written as, "The door was opened." It means the door that was ...
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2 votes

Can an imperative sentence have a subject?

Imperative sentences tend not to have an explicit subject but will always have an implied subject. This is because every verb requires a subject that engages in the action described by the verb ...
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17 votes

Can an imperative sentence have a subject?

OK, first the vocatives. When we name the person we're addressing, the term for that is a Vocative noun phrase. For instance: Honey, I'm home. Mom, you just don't understand. Sandra, he's coming to ...
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5 votes

Can an imperative sentence have a subject?

Does it make any sense to say that there is an implied subject "you" making the sentence: Yes. Here are some sources discussing the "you-understood" that include examples like the ...
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