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In simplest terms the answer to this would be: When are you visiting them? Tomorrow. [Adverb] Where are you going? Home. [Adverb] How are you doing? Fine. [Adverb] Why are you doing this? Because he is such a badass. [Adverb clause of reason] The last question demands an explanation and therefore an adverb phrase or clause is required. Not necessarily ...


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In the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), we find the following in the entry for the adverb high : In a high position; at a high altitude; far up, aloft. Often overlapping with or difficult to distinguish from the adjective used as the complement of a verb. The sentence [1] This ranks fairly high on my list. would seem to be one of those cases where one ...


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This is a tricky question. The online Cambridge English Dictionary lists both as: predeterminer, determiner, pronoun So all three, depending on the context. This online version goes on to provide a lengthy series of illustrations of the uses of each status. It is worth looking at what this word is doing in its differing uses, in a language that has ...


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Both the brothers are actors. "Both" is neither an adjective nor a pronoun. It belongs to the word category (part of speech) 'determinative'. Its function here is that of 'predeterminer' (modifier), a type of quantificational expression. Although "both" is located within the NP, it is outside the head NP "the brothers": [Both [...


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If we look at 'so' the way we see the pronouns like something , nothing and everything that succeed the verb 'say ' , we might tend to suppose 'so' to be a pronoun like them but 'so' is to be thought as conveying the manner of the verb , say in the sense of ' the same way ' or ' in such a way ' but not as a replacement to an object which is usually a noun ...


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Remember that depot rhymes not with Camelot nor with pipit, but with sheepo. It ends with a vowel, not a consonant, so attempting to apply verbal inflections to the noun would result in spellings that would confuse people. Only if you had first potted your book could you then consider depotting it. And while pot as a verb can have other meanings, most people ...


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In order to simplify the discussion, I will change your examples so that the phrase of interest is integrated into the syntactical structure of the sentence. This is not the case in your examples; the that-phrases there are suplements, meaning that they are only semantically, but not syntactically, linked to another part of the sentence, the so-called anchor....


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