New answers tagged

1

I would phrase like this: It is not necessary to call this function multiple times, but it won't hurt anything. or Multiple calls to this function are unnecessary, but they won't hurt anything. Additionally, if this is a relevant example, unnecessary function calls waste resources, memory, and processing time; so, it is harmful. You could thus rephrase ...


0

[ Sheng nu ](it's three words not one!) seems to be a joke rhyme of 剩余 [ shèng yú ], so if it were possible to find a rhyming chide, that would be a good translation. perhaps like a "debris dame", "Lady Leftover". "waste woman". "female fragments" I can't think of a very good one.


-1

Comment on old trope for others who may happen upon this dialogue “for a reason” ; ) The statement, “everything happens because of a reason” is literally, “everything happens by cause of [or due to] motive and result .” A precise analogue for, "Everything happens due to cause and effect." Other ways to convey the same idea 1) Shit happens. 2) Human affairs ...


12

Calling this function multiple times is unnecessary but harmless. The answer is simple. Your first version, shown above, is perfectly correct, logical and unambiguous. Changing your original sentence is unnecessary and may even be harmful!


0

I believe the entire idea can be captured concisely by a single word perhaps? How about "Calling this function multiple times is :" "extraneous" or "redundant" or as one other answer already suggested, "superfluous"


2

As a native speaker of American English, I would say that someone "confused A with B." I might also say, on the other hand, that "there was some confusion on [someone]'s part between A and B." Notice that when I use between, it does not immediately follow the verb (or verb phrase) as in your example. That is because the word between, a ...


7

You need a concessive/contrastive (word or phrase); these normally come before the adjective at the end of the type of sentence you specify (ie 'It is A but C B' rather than 'It is A but B C'): Calling this function multiple times is unnecessary but/though admittedly harmless. Calling this function multiple times is unnecessary – but/though then again, ...


4

Calling this function for multiple times is unnecessary but harmless either. This sentence is incorrect, either would need a negative verb to make sense here: Calling this function for multiple times is unnecessary, but it does not cause harm either. (not a very successful sentence) Your second sentence is much better, nothing wrong with it. Other ways ...


5

sounds like superfluous to me su·per·flu·ous /so͞oˈpərflo͞oəs/ adjective unnecessary, especially through being more than enough. "the purchaser should avoid asking for superfluous information" An adjective can work as well in your sentence.


0

What sort of audience are you speaking to? Literary, technical, professional, casual? Would stylistic emphasis help you find the delivery that you're looking for (i.e. italicization or employing punction)? The nature of your sentence strikes me as congenial/lighthearted. If that's true, maybe try a conversational approach: "Calling this function ...


0

"On the one hand"... "on the other hand" to separate arguments. "On one side"... "on the other side" to separate two lists of things with opposed qualities.


0

I would think such a person is a naysayer: one who denies, refuses, opposes, or is skeptical or cynical about something (Merriam-Webster) e.g. Many people pitied my commonsensical, public-spirited child for being raised by an antisocial naysayer like me. (WordHippo)


-2

It's not all that difficult , even though our English language is a contradiction of itself . You can call it as a verb , to spell check or spellcheck if one wishes , HOWEVER , based on our building of our language , to spell check is the action verb eg , "Please spell check that document" or "Spellcheck that document." As a NOUN , there'...


0

Fruitless, Impractical, Or my personal favorite: Sis·y·phe·an /ˌsisəˈfēən/ adjective Denoting or relating to a task that can never be completed. "the pursuit of perfection is a Sisyphean task"


0

The indecisiveness might be covered by vacillation, though this suggests a changing or wavering mind.


0

Did you consider an adjective instead of a noun? his constant delightful dilemma between going to Paris or London” A little alliteration always helps too.


0

A choice between two equally good options is called the dilemma of Buridan's ass. So it is still referred to as a dilemma, but often stated obliquely (not as a 'thing'), e.g. "You are in the same situation as Buridan's ass."


0

Try swither = to be uncertain about what to do or choose Cambridge Dictionary Hence: "his constant swithering between London or Paris" Merriam Webster states the word to be mainly British dialect. That is consistent with the use I have heard this last 70 years. Google ngram supports MW in showing ten times the British usage compared to the ...


1

I think quandary works quite well here. Quandary Cambridge Dictionary a state of not being able to decide what to do about a situation in which you are involved:


0

"Enter the ASCII system." "Enter" is simply an introduction word to emphasize something not quite anticipated that follows. That "something" (ASCII) appears to be a solution for the issue at hand.


1

Whereas the pilgrim fathers three centuries earlier may have sought religious salvation , many immigrants in the 1900s sought economic salvation: being saved from the economic dangers of starvation and unemployment. salvation = being saved from danger, loss, or harm Cambridge Dictionary In your context, the appropriate antonym is therefore not religious ...


0

damnation: (in Christian belief) condemnation to eternal punishment in hell. (Lexico) sins that risk eternal damnation perdition: (in Christian theology) a state of eternal punishment and damnation into which a sinful and unpenitent person passes after death. (Lexico) Hence, if the children suffer eternal perdition because their parents, who are ...


-1

You may find this if you look up a list of synonyms of 'loyal/ty', but such lists do not inform about different nuances and differing distributions. fealty ... 2: intense fidelity the fealty of country music fans to their favorite stars [Nicholas Dawidoff] [Merriam-Webster] The original sense informs the now more usually found one: 1a: the fidelity of a ...


0

I hate to go on a tangent, but... tangent NOUN 2 A completely different line of thought or action. Lexico


1

Not a direct match, but if she has her own job and life, "career woman" or "career-minded woman" or "single professional woman" might fit. This is specific to the woman who puts more of her life into her job, and so her single state is her choice, or the result of her being busy, rather than because she is left over. Unlike ...


-1

Such a virtue could be described as abnegation (also self-abnegation) renunciation of your own interests in favor of the interests of others Vocabulary.com says: When you purposely deny yourself something, especially in favor of the needs of others, you would describe this act as an abnegation. This has to be your choice, not the choice of others — so it'...


2

You are making an aside: a remark or story in a speech or text that is not part of the main subject. (Cambridge Dictionary) the content of the aside would be a panegyric a eulogistic oration or writing (M-W)


0

Orate or oration I don't want to orate, but a man of your position has so much to lose; you can't afford to do it.


6

Firstly, "leftover" doesn't unambiguously refer to food as in "last night's leftovers in the fridge". A leftover anything is something that remains. For instance, "Bob went into the building one more time to grab a few leftover boxes and items, and then shut the door for good." If the "leftover" is turned into a noun, ...


2

Perhaps a "passed-over" woman, which puts focus on the actions of others, rather than suggesting a deficiency as "left-over" seems to.


3

A French scholar to the rescue - thesis by Pierre Schaeffer, 2005 - Université Lumière Lyon 2 Dans sa deuxième lettre du 12 mars 1929, c’est la restitution du bruit des mouettes que Lowry empruntera à Aiken pour clore sa lettre : « Klioklio, C.M. Lowry » (SL, p.7/ CL1, p. 64). My translation In his second letter of March 12, 1929, it is the representation ...


1

As mentioned by TaliesinMerlin, In English we have the (somewhat dated) term "old maid"... old maid NOUN 1 derogatory A single woman regarded as too old for marriage. Lexico


25

There is not going to be an ideal fit for a neutral version of this term in English. Traditionally, older unmarried women were looked upon negatively So you have older words like spinster and old maid that have strongly negative connotations. There are also adjectives like unmarried and unattached that may come across as negative due to the un- form. It is ...


18

Yes, "leftover woman" is the correct translation. It may not be politically correct, or seem polite, but that is the term and it reflects Chinese cultural attitudes towards those women within Mainland China. The word is used in China and in English-language literature on the subject, including in many peer-review journal articles. See Google ...


0

I would suggest "modular": OED modular (adj.) 2 b.** Originally: designating or conforming to a system of building design or construction based on a standard module. Hence more generally: involving or consisting of modules or discrete units as the basis of design, construction, or operation; (also) intended to form part of such a system. Also in ...


1

How about domain ? I suppose this word is often used in mathematical parlance when suggesting a range of values. The domain of model outputs can be deterministic or stochastic.


0

I made him angry. Making him angry may not have been your intention. You may have said or done something and, even though it wasn't something you expected, it made him angry. I got him angry. Getting him angry may have been your intention all along. You wanted him angry, and you got him angry.


0

The situation would be called as triangulation or in some context Back-channeling (if to some extent secretive). So following would be possibly suitable as formal. Triangulating intermediator or Triangulating arbitrator or Triangulating intercessor Triangulation / Back channeling


0

In addition to previous answers, you could also simplify it and say "making sure that a lot of people turn up".


0

Covert means secret or hidden. Soldiers might take part in a covert mission to infiltrate an enemy camp — and you might take part in a covert mission to steal your brother's leftover Halloween candy. Covert is the opposite of overt, which means obvious, or in full view. Covert things are hidden, private, or stealthy.


2

In Lowry's 1928 letter to Aiken, the echoic phrase 'te-thrum' is an homage to Aiken's 1927 novel, Blue Voyage. In Blue Voyage, "te thrum" appears repeatedly in the narrator's internal monolog, as a representation of the sound of the narrator's heart in his ear. Thus, Lowry and Aiken both use "te thrum" to represent the sound of a blood ...


2

If you are talking about the process : The generation of the model outputs can be deterministic or stochastic. You could be referring to what is generated such as: The values of the model outputs can be deterministic or stochastic. Similarly if you really want to focus in on outputs as a whole: The distribution of the model outputs can be deterministic ...


1

uncooperative resonates with an early definition of emergence: The philosopher G. H. Lewes coined the term "emergent", writing in 1875: Every resultant is either a sum or a difference of the co-operant forces; their sum, when their directions are the same – their difference, when their directions are contrary. Further, every resultant is clearly ...


0

I'm not really seeing this addressed in the other responses: it's quite nonsense that "rebate" or "bonus" or any of these other terms would be taken to suggest anything immoral. These terms are common and normal in consumer and business contexts. I'm guessing that in the German term, "rabatt" refers to the value being ...


0

You seem to mean "connotation." "Mobile" is just descriptive -- it doesn't have a feel of being bad or good. "Mobile home" is cheaper than an ordinary home, so that's a little more negative. "Upwardly mobile" is positive. "Mobile phone" is probably a little positive, since it's a luxury and when people refer ...


3

Denotations are neutral. They're simply the literal dictionary definition of a word, and mobile's definition is able to move or be moved freely or easily, or relating to portable technology. The term you may be looking for is connotation, which is the positive or negative meaning associated with a phrase. Consider this: If I invite you to my cottage in the ...


3

No, "Gen" meaning lawyer is unknown to most dictionaries. (However they have other definitions for "gen" so it is allowed to be played.) "gen" can mean "information". The OED says it originated as R.A.F. slang. Other dictionaries have also "gen" used as slang for "generation".


0

Another case in which the verb to be may be used to express the present or perfect tense is demonstrated in this question (now closed) Emily Dickinson poem A verse is bothering me:"Where is Jesus gone?" (From “Dying! Dying in the night!) Emily Dickinson poem Christians are brought up reading the Bible: often the King James Version. The King ...


0

I would suggest using the phrase "not secure". For example, this is what is shown in Chrome if a website is determined not to be secure.


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