New answers tagged

0 votes

Word for count of undesirable events

Among the other good suggestions, I might add: Slippage in its sense: failure to maintain an expected level, fulfill a goal, meet a deadline, etc. Individual instances could be slips; the verb could ...
user avatar
  • 1,326
2 votes
Accepted

Word for count of undesirable events

From the context you have provided, it appears that a) the register needs to be formal but should be universally understood. b) the word should be a generic that refers to undesirable events of any ...
user avatar
4 votes

Word for count of undesirable events

Failure rate or failure-rate is obviously regarded as a compound noun by YourDictionary; it gives the hyphenated compound (though the examples it gives all use the open compound). The examples also ...
user avatar
2 votes

Word for count of undesirable events

Deficit deficiency in amount or quality. a deficit in rainfall 2a. lack or impairment in an ability or functional capacity. cognitive deficits, a hearing deficit 2b. DISADVANTAGE M-W The usage ...
user avatar
  • 15.9k
2 votes

Word for count of undesirable events

In the context you have provided, lag can be used. Lag is a particularly common in the gaming community. Backlog is another words that can be used in contexts such as this. For e.g. backlog of unpaid ...
user avatar
  • 959
2 votes
Accepted

Use of “fat” and “fatty”

The suffix "-y", applied to a noun, means "like" or "full of". So "grassy" means either "grass-like" or "covered with grass". The word "...
user avatar
  • 21.3k
2 votes

What are attractions at fair called, where you buy food?

I would say you can use stand, stall, or booth, also depending on what an attraction is like, exactly. For example, I would probably expect a booth to have side walls/panels between which you stand, ...
user avatar
3 votes

What are attractions at fair called, where you buy food?

Concession Stand: noun US A stall or booth, typically selling food or inexpensive items, and operating within a larger business or commercial area. (Source - Lexico) A fair is a gathering of people ...
user avatar
  • 3,309
1 vote

"The shadows born" is the use of "born" correct in this sentence?

As pointed out above, in order to use 'ellipsis' to reduce relative clauses we use the participle form - both past participle and present participle. e.g. Even Tom, who is considered to be an expert, ...
user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

"The shadows born" is the use of "born" correct in this sentence?

The shadows born is a perfectly good noun phrase (a little unusual with the adjective born following rather than preceding, but not unknown, especially in a title). It is not a full sentence, because ...
user avatar
  • 74.5k
1 vote

Answering "I don't have a criminal background"

In conversational English, you might hear something like this: Q: Don't you have the textbook? A: No, I don't. -or- Yes, I do have the textbook. But a form is not a conversation. This should be ...
user avatar
  • 16k
1 vote

How to describe a person who withholds information to make the situation seem worse than it is?

That person is a prevaricator. He doesn't speak the precise truth. See: https://www.dictionary.com/browse/prevaricator
user avatar
  • 56
4 votes

What is the connotation of “The Hitchhiker's Guide to XYZ”?

What is the connotation of “The Hitchhiker's Guide to XYZ”? The exact connotations that individual authors (or their publishers) wish to convey in naming their book “The Hitchhiker's Guide to XYZ” is ...
user avatar
8 votes

What is the connotation of “The Hitchhiker's Guide to XYZ”?

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy* that we read, hear, or even watch is funny, and fun. "Don't Panic" is a key theme, certainly. But within what we see, the Guide is a book (an ...
user avatar
  • 21k
7 votes

What is the connotation of “The Hitchhiker's Guide to XYZ”?

Don't Panic This is inscribed on the actual (in-universe meaning) cover of the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. It means to take a relaxed attitude towards new and interesting situations, and learn ...
user avatar
67 votes

What is the connotation of “The Hitchhiker's Guide to XYZ”?

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is itself a reference to a book title that was well-known at the time Douglas Adams wrote his original radio drama. "The Hitchhiker's Guide to Europe" by ...
user avatar
  • 21.3k
0 votes

Whisper into or whisper in?

I like how this writer made the distinction between the two words: "The word 'in' is used to denote a state when something is enclosed by something else. 'into' is used to express motion wherein ...
user avatar
  • 463
0 votes

Which is correct, "opt out of" or "opt out from" and why?

Either one is correct, since "opted out" is the main operating part of the phrase, not "of" or "from."
user avatar
  • 463
-1 votes

Why use 'step down' instead of 'resign'? Is there any difference?

‘Step down’ is to ‘resign’ as ‘bow out’ is to ‘lose’. Using ‘emeritus’ for ‘retired’ is another fancy term. My wife forgot to renew her driving licence yet was still telling me how to drive. She’s a ‘...
user avatar
1 vote

Which word can be used to describe the lesson that introduce the content or usage of one chapter?

Some suggestions: "Introductory": of, relating to, or being a first step that sets something going or in proper perspective "Overview" "Background" "Motivation"...
user avatar
  • 1,735
1 vote

I need a word whose meaning is somewhere on the spectrum between 'too scared' and 'too dumb'. Or a phrase/idiom

"Bart, we’re literally here buying you drugs cus you’re too chicken to buy your own high" From Urban Dictionary, which for once, provides a decent definition too chicken When someone is ...
user avatar
  • 85.4k
0 votes

I need a word whose meaning is somewhere on the spectrum between 'too scared' and 'too dumb'. Or a phrase/idiom

pathetic (Lexico.com) Arousing pity, especially through vulnerability or sadness Miserably inadequate; of very low standard ...where in practice, that "vulnerability" is often fearfulness, ...
user avatar
0 votes

I need a word whose meaning is somewhere on the spectrum between 'too scared' and 'too dumb'. Or a phrase/idiom

"panicky" may fit the bill, as it implies unreasoning and overpowering fear, making one unable to act astutely in an emergency. panicky - "thrown into a state of intense fear or ...
user avatar
  • 49.1k
2 votes

Answering "I don't have a criminal background"

Your understanding is correct. In Middle and early Modern English, there were the words "yea" and "nay". Yea = Your statement is correct Nay = Your statement is incorrect These ...
user avatar
  • 28k
1 vote

Answering "I don't have a criminal background"

In such questions, "yes" refers to "correct" and "no" to "incorrect". So, it makes much more sense to pick yes in this question.
user avatar
0 votes

displaced vs replaced

replace: 1 : to restore to a former place or position replace cards in a file 2 : to take the place of especially as a substitute or successor (this is the case here) 3 : to put something new in the ...
user avatar
-1 votes

"you're alright, mate?" to a stranger. American equivalent for "mate"

Dude, man, guy, friend, buddy, pal etc - I think all work... they do all seem 'masculine' though There is a class element to it too I guess ‘Mate’ has the suggestion that you’re socially equal. You ...
user avatar
  • 1
0 votes

Is there a word or a common phrase for this motion of the hands

David Foster Wallace calls this making hand cages, or pyramids, or shapes in "Brief Interviews with Hideous Men" in the context of a woman visiting her therapist.
user avatar
0 votes
Accepted

Why is ‘it won’t take more than 15 minutes’ correct while ‘it won’t take at least 15 minutes’ is not?

Perhaps this can make it clearer why they're not equivalent: If I say "It will take more than 15 minutes", and someone says "No it won't", they're saying that it will not take ...
user avatar
  • 14.7k
1 vote

Difference between 'spake' and 'spoke'?

Bare and bore are not different tenses. They are both past tense of bear. But bare is archaic and never used now. Same with sware and swore - both past tense of swear.
user avatar
1 vote

Is it meaningful to say "a few moments"?

Having worked in development receiving calls for the rollout of an international financial service assistance center, best practices advised against asking customers to hold "for a moment," ...
user avatar
  • 2,448
2 votes

Is it meaningful to say "a few moments"?

Moment seems to be one of the words of the moment. Google ngrams of various phrases show an increase in usage over the last 20 years. I illustrate this with the following phrase which I think allows a ...
user avatar
  • 10.1k
2 votes

"Trawling through" or "trolling through"

"Trawl through" and "troll through" are both used in reference to looking through a collection of things (especially documents), but it's not clear if these terms mean the same ...
user avatar
1 vote

Is it meaningful to say "a few moments"?

The use of "moment/s" as a description of the passage of time - is intrinsically defined by the context of its appearance. Just give me a moment of your time and I'll try to explain it. Lets ...
user avatar
  • 131
6 votes
Accepted

Obfuscate or obscure a password

Password masking seems to be the usual term, so if you want a verb it would be to mask a password. From security expert Bruce Schneier's blog: "Slashdot asks if password masking — replacing ...
user avatar
  • 4,395

Top 50 recent answers are included