New answers tagged

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Generally, there is no exact translation of umay in English, this is something unique in Philippine culture. The best way is to describe what is umay to be clear and understood by non- Filipino audience.


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The internet is not being considered a person. This is simply a case where "the internet" is used as shorthand for "the people on the internet". We see the same for: High school girl's prom dress amazes the committee. The rookie's skills impressed the team. New York's claim to be "coolest city" angers San Francisco. In each ...


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I am not totally sure about this, but I think it's because the internet is supported and made by a mass of people that collaborate together. If you have a question, have you ever heard the phrase 'Ask Google'? That probably means the internet is a person that answers your questions. Each site and conversation that you had on the internet contributes to the ...


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Tantalizing Desire is the word used for yearning to possess something which is unobtainable. So you were totally tantalized by something.


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a personal character In the '90s, when Prince (i.e., Prince Rogers Nelson) lost the legal rights to his name to his record label, which had copyrighted it, he craftily changed his name to a personal character of his own design: I say he did so "craftily" because by him self-designing it and thus it being entirely unique to him and by him himself† ...


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There is this avatar NOUN 2. An icon or figure representing a particular person in video games, internet forums, etc. ‘conversation is depicted in a balloon over the avatar's head’ LEXICO For example, on this forum there is a little picture to the left of my user name at the bottom of my posts. I put in my own custom avatar, rather than using the default ...


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Do you know Jack? Yes...well...he has a wonderful sense of humour.


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A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language (Quirk et al) explains: The basic reflexive pronoun is sometimes optional, in the sense that it may acceptably be replaced by the more usual 'ordinary' objective pronoun. The self-forms are chosen to supply special emphasis. [The scare quotes are mine, EA, and I'd say the reflexive forms are sometimes chosen ...


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The term "mate" is essentially gender neutral in Australia. This applies almost in all cases except perhaps if you're a male and bump into a woman who is 'generationally' older than you. In that case, just 'Sorry' or 'Excuse me' is fine.


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You might try "Sorry my friend", with a quick, gentle pat to the upper arm.


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It is possible to say “The school will take the students to the zoo.” The meaning is clear. Examples to that: "the White House will send greetings...", "Moscow will introduce...", etc. There is no question to that, and “The teachers will take the students to the zoo.” doesn't make it any better. So, you can choose whichever you want.


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Royal = belonging or connected to a king or queen or a member of their family: Cambridge Another usage is illustrated by Royal = good or excellent, as if intended for or typical of royalty: “The team was given a royal reception/welcome.” Cambridge The company is suggesting that it has Royal customers, in the sense that they are members of a royal family. ...


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The basic meaning of "simulacrum" is "image" (sometimes with the connotation "mere image"). The specific concept that you describe, of "simulacrum" being used to refer to some instrument of sympathetic magic, is not a usage that I can find in any dictionary. Something not being in the dictionary doesn't exactly mean ...


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There is great overlap in the meanings. Bug starts as OED I. An insect or other arthropod. 1 Any small insect or larva that is considered to be a pest. Also more widely (now chiefly U.S.): any insect or other small arthropod (e.g. a spider or centipede), 1594 Hester's Pearle of Pract. i. xxxii. 14 This medecine caused many times, a certaine blacke ...


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If you mean that you had previously invested in or bought into the feminine beauty ideal and now wish to divest, you may use "from" to express that nuance (see def. 1 - fourth example), literal or figurative not having any bearing on usage as all things literal may be used figuratively, there being nothing literal that is barred from figurative use....


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The closest star to the Southern Celestial Pole is Sigma Octantis, nowadays officially named Polaris Australis. It's not as close to the pole as Polaris is (Polaris is 3/4 degrees away from the pole, Polaris Australis is about one full degree away), and most importantly, its magnitude is very low, so the human eye won't be able to easily observe it. The ...


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The more common preposition is OF also in a figurative usage: (see sense 2 from OLD) Divest: divest yourself of something to get rid of something The company is divesting itself of some of its assets. divest somebody/something of something to take something away from someone or something After her illness she was divested of much of her responsibility. ...


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According to several dictionaries, she would be your "step-grandmother". stepgrandmother (plural stepgrandmothers) The stepmother of one's father or mother and the wife of one's grandfather, usually a woman that one's grandfather marries after the divorce of one's grandparents or the death of one's grandmother. The mother of one's stepmother or ...


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I know that two people are first cousins if their parents are siblings, but what do you call your cousin's wife or husband, are they still your first cousin? No, cousins are related by blood, not by marriage. OED 1b. spec. A child of the brother or sister of either of one's parents; a person with whom one has one or more (typically two) grandparents in ...


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According to dictionary.com, since 1350 A.D. to 1400 A.D.: First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin situs “position, arrangement, site” (presumably originally, “leaving, setting down”), equivalent to si-, variant stem of sinere “to leave, allow to be” + -tus suffix of verbal action You can find this information in many ...


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I looked through the thesaurus, and two words you may find useful are ‘contest’ and ‘denounce’. Contest carries the meaning of arguing and questioning, similar to challenge: to struggle or fight for, as in battle. to argue against; dispute: to contest a controversial question; to contest a will. to call in question: They contested his right to speak. ...


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"To contend against" is a close synonym. (SOED)4 v.i. Argue (with, against, etc.) They contend against the ethos of their particular eras and in turn, inflict personal and political change. Here can be perused plenty of examples; by doing so a truer feel of the term can be gained. A telling sample The classical student has only to contend ...


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Lawyers generally call this sort of judging result-oriented or result-driven. More cynical lawyers call it judging.


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"I would like to book annual leave for 08/08/2021" means "I will be out of the office on 8/8." "I would like to book annual leave on 08/08/2021" is ambiguous. It could mean, "I will be out of the office on 8/8," but it could also mean "On 8/8, I will schedule my leave for some date after 8/8." Neither ...


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Take your time and explain it. There's nothing wrong with a sentence like They stood on the glass floor of the emotionless chamber. From beneath they could see a myriad of blinking lights. And even though no one knew what any of these lights did, they all decided to head west.


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After going through and reviewing the comments, I will go with “Competence” as the quality of having technical Expertise. As per the further search and study, I can think of the following are the 5 qualities to become a successful, I believe now. Aspiration Drive Willingness to learn Patience Discipline https://www.google.com.sg/amp/s/www.entrepreneur.com/...


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When I say at the centre, I think of a particular point, like the centre of a circle. On the other hand, in the centre gives a vague idea of some area surrounding the centre. So, if you're the main figure who is causing the change, it should be at the centre and if you're just a part of it, like say a member of a political campaign, you can use in. However, ...


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To say if there is a semantic error, we would need to know what the intended meaning of the sentences is. “Someone parked their cars at the entrance” is incorrect if it is meant to convey that there was a single car parked at the entrance, but correct if it is meant to express that multiple cars were parked at the entrance. A verb used with we, you, or they ...


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Recipient Dictionary.com: a person or thing that receives; receive Cambridge dictionary: a person who receives something Merriem-Webster: one that receives : RECEIVER Vocabulary.com: the person on the receiving end of something. Macmillan: someone who receives something


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I tried Ngram to compare the popularity of various words.


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The most common word here is launch. I want to launch Chrome. Source: years of technical writing in software environments.


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I think this really depends on the context. "Run" implies an active process that persists over time, whereas "open" represents a one-time event. I'm running Chrome in the background. I opened Chrome to access Google.


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I think you can use the expression: Find fault with: If you find fault with something or someone, you look for mistakes and complain about them. I was disappointed whenever the cook found fault with my work. (Collins Dictionary)


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Is this what you're looking for? touch a raw nerve If you say that you have touched a nerve or touched a raw nerve, you mean that you have accidentally upset someone by talking about something that they feel strongly about or are very sensitive about. The mere mention of John had touched a very raw nerve indeed. [Collins]


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The phrase "to be sent" in that context utilizes a future periphrastic construction. It means the same thing as going to be sent, not have been sent.


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If the flow of sand through the fingers is thin, then "to trickle" may be used, or, as well, "to seep". For a trickling through something like a sieve, a filter, or the fingers, the preposition "through" is proper. There is also the option to use the corresponding noun. (OALD) ​1 [intransitive, transitive] to flow, or to make ...


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The Native American (Nahuatl) name for the flat round bread was tlaxcali. Torta in ancient Latin meant "round bread" sweet or savory so a "cake-like food. When the Spanish saw the Amerindian flat breads they called it tortilla (small flat round bread) - illo, illa, ito, ita is a diminutive suffix. With time, torta, tortilla, tortita has also ...


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The waves lapped the ship's hull. lap3 2. (of water) wash against (something) with a gentle rippling sound. ‘the waves lapped the shore’ Source: Lexico—lap Note that the verb in this sense is considered transitive, which means an object will follow. Lapped what? Lapped the shore or lapped the ship's hull. You will also encounter intransitive usages of lap (...


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Try thinking about it this way. It is obvious what you mean. And the passive form is properly formed. I could suggest that the problem is that the 'cry' that is used in 'cry after' is intransitive, and that is why "I would be cried after" sounds odd. But there are parallel formations that are apparently similar but also correct. 'Look' in 'look ...


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This is one of those contexts where usage has changed over time. This was the situation until just a few decades ago... ...and this is the situation today... I would just say that if anyone thinks people have started using a different form of words because they're conveying a different meaning (no matter how "subtle" the difference might be), all ...


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Think of what the wind was doing in or near your hair. What was your hair doing as a result of the wind? Then in your description of that you will have opportunities to be creative. A wind generally blows rather than moves.


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This can also be said about a stomach if you're hungry. Just heard it in the animated movie "Soul". It says, "Your stomach is earthquaking".


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A club, historically, was a place where people clubbed together to have meals and accommodation in common. A resort was a place that people had occasion to visit, to resort to. A salon was originally just a large room, but it became shorthand for a place where intelligent people would come together to hear music and hear lectures and so forth. An association ...


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I don't know of any word or phrase other than "meet your heroes". And it's usually prefaced with "Never". And there's a good reason. The world is full of stories about people who met their heroes, and were disappointed. https://thoughtcatalog.com/justin-hook/2012/09/12-reasons-you-should-never-meet-your-hero/ https://www.suggest.com/...


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Language is ever evolving though so making arguments based solely on older definitions and usage doesn't account for all of the morphology of the word, since there are examples in modern usage. I would agree with OP that those are common phrases that I've heard as a native English speaker. Another commenter included the phrase "bags of meat" in ...


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Articifial mythology, or mythopoeia describes the devices in fiction, fantasy, or world building that can sometimes be quite parallel to our own. In the same vein as your examples, the Thursday Next series by Jasper Fforde is a parallel world of metafiction with worlds within worlds of alternate history where fantastic literary detectives police novels ...


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I abide by the Edwin Ashworth's point of view on the issue in question (as to the lookout for the usage of the phrase and its relevance). From a grammatical point of view: On the one hand "one" can be an adjective meaning "very" that can be put in instead of the Indefinite article before adjectives: "She was keeping a very big ...


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Short answer: There's nothing immediately wrong with that phrase. But be aware, there's a little ambiguity in "over the radio" as it could also mean the medium through which you heard the voices. If you mean to say that you heard local voices despite the radio, you'll want a little bit of disambiguation. Maybe a direct reference to the voices you ...


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You are correct. That is not idiomatic. While "that big of a [noun]" is commonly used, you can see from this Google Ngram comparison that usage of "one big of" is practically non-existent


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