New answers tagged

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come back home will be better if we use


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When speaking to someone, I would say that it is all about where they are as the listener. Talking to your spouse: If you are at your home with your spouse, you are going to the office If you are at the office and your spouse is at your home, you are coming home Talking to your boss: If your boss is at their home and you are at your home, you are going to ...


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This is really hard to answer because it depends on the speaker's and the listener's point of view. It can also depend on their imagined points of view at the future time the action is planned to happen. I will go to the office and then go back home. The speaker and listener are both away from home and away from the office. Or, the listener will not be at ...


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go and come is used in relation to the location of the speaker or the listener: I am at the office. I will be going home in an hour. Your mate might ask you in that regard on the telephone: What time are you coming home? [Your mate is at home. Your mate is the speaker.] You might answer that: I'm coming home soon. However, you might also say: I'll be home ...


13

From the point of view of a person at your home, you are "coming home". From the point of view of a person at your office, you are "going home". What about your own point of view as you go? It could be either, depending on how you are thinking of it.


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As the comments suggest, there is in fact nothing wrong with your writing (well, nothing major ;) we can always pick nits). The tool you are using appears intended to create a particular style of writing suited to attracting attention via search engines, and in fact this will spoil your writing. @Shoe's observation is quite correct: you're not (we hope) ...


3

As the comments already suggest, there is a subtle difference, which is how long they imply an action goes on for. Around the clock means without ceasing, even during the night when most normal activity ceases. It can (and usually does) mean that one or people stayed up all night, but can also mean a larger collection (say, the workforce of a factory or the ...


1

"However" is the correct answer. The SAT is a standardized test, which means that there can only be one correct answer. "In fact," "moreover," and "indeed" all mean the same thing. This means that they must be wrong. Since the test is objective, you will never have to choose the "better" answer out of two (...


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For most everyday purposes, there is no difference, but strictly speaking, and taking these formulations at face value, there is. I think only means that you have this particular thought; the formulation, considered by itself does not imply anything, about whether and how this thought is related to any other thoughts you may have. For all that this ...


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They are the same. You can use whichever one you would like. "Perspective" is: A particular attitude toward or way of regarding something; a point of view. [Lexico] I will define "thought" instead of "think" so both definitions are for nouns. A "thought" is: An idea or opinion produced by thinking, or occurring ...


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This answer is from experience inside and out of the North American expatriate bubble. I'm a bit passionate about the subject, so please tell me if this is a rant. I am a North American native, but have lived in South America for most of my life. As a foreigner in the various countries that I have lived in, I can say that "Bubble" describes ...


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Bubble carries an often-negative connotation that anyone or anything inside the bubble is unnaturally or dangerously isolated from the world, and often the additional sense that this isolation is delusional or imperiled, or both. In contrast, a person has multiple circles. I might not be admitted to one circle or another, but there are others; I am not ...


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A staff is a group of persons under command and control of a single person or an aggregate of persons who operate as a unit. A staffer is one member of a staff. Complexity comes into this picture in two ways. If the term "staffers" meant to be inclusive of all members of a staff with no qualifications this would make the use of the two terms ...


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"Self-conscious," "paranoid," or "insecure" could all work in this context, assuming that their friends' claims are not actually being negative. Self-conscious - "Uncomfortably conscious of oneself as an object of the observation of others." [Merriam-Webster] Paranoid - "Unreasonably or obsessively anxious, ...


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"Staff" and "staffer" are essentially the same, but they are slightly distinct. "Staff" is defined as: All the people employed by a particular organization. [Lexico] Therefore, "staff" is a collective noun (such as "family" or "crew"). "Staffer" is defined as: A member of the staff of ...


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The verb for this, which doesn't specify the part of the utensil used, is actually spoon: [Merriam-Webster] transitive : to take up and usually transfer in a spoon Used in your example: I spooned peanut butter out of the jar. What's good about this verb is that it doesn't matter how you used the spoon, only that you did. However, if you do want to ...


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Origin of the term 'K-9 unit' An Elephind newspaper database search turns up at least one instance of "K-9 unit" from World War II. From "5th Infantry Dog Up to Snuff With '201' File" in the [Colorado Springs, Colorado] Camp Carson Mountaineer (November 11, 1943): It is not unusual for a soldier to have a personal (201) file in ...


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A corporate climber or ladder climber might fit here. While I can't find a dictionary definition that affirms these phrases, Google Ngrams certainly supports them. They are related to the term social climber which can be found in Merriam-Webster. Whether you view them as positive, neutral, or negative is really a personal point of view, but increasingly, ...


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"Extempore/extemporaneous/extemporary," "spontaneous," "unpremeditated," "unplanned," and their synonyms can accomplish this task. "Extempore," "extemporaneous," and "extemporary" are all defined as: Spoken or done without preparation. [Lexico] These three are the most fitting words for ...


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Ingratiating, sycophantic, groveling, unctuous, obsequious, and other synonyms could apply to this situation. These words are all synonyms of each other, so they all have (very) similar meanings. Sycophantic is defined as: behaving or done in an obsequious way in order to gain advantage. [Lexico] Obsequious is defined as: obedient or attentive to an ...


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I believe that both are correct. They are both understandable and unambiguous. To me, “resume normal operations” implies that it will resume its normal tasks. And “resume its normal operation” implies that it will operate in its normal manner. These implications are both clear and mean the same thing.


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The main difference between the terms coward and pusillanimous is one of usage, not in meaning. The overwhelming majority of native speakers will use "coward/cowardly/cowardice" exclusively in speech, and have only read or heard of "pusillanimous" while studying for the SAT or GRE test. Etymonline says early 15c., from Late Latin ...


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Webster's Dictionary of Synonyms, first edition (1942) addresses cowardly and pusillanimous in an entry that also includes the allied terms poltroon, craven, dastardly, and recreant: Cowardly, pusillanimous, poltroon, craven, dastardly, recreant agree in meaning excessively timid or timorous. Cowardly, the most general term, implies a weak or ignoble, ...


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To the customer: All work will be performed according to your specifications. The hardware configuration that you requested has not been previously built and tested by us. We therefore cannot offer any estimates as to how well it will perform. If you wish to modify the hardware configuration after having confirmed that it meets your original specification,...


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Although there is indeed a considerable overlap between the two, they are not quite the same. Pusillanimous can be used as a rough synonym for timid, while cowardly cannot. Cowardice always involves fear of some relatively definite adverse consequences. A soldier may be cowardly in a battle because he fears being killed by the enemy. A cowardly employee ...


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The two words have similar meanings, but different implications. Perhaps most significant is that cowardly tends to imply something about the subject's actions, while pusillanimous bears more on their personality and behavior. A pusillanimous person would tend to not take a position in a political discussion, eg, while a cowardly person might denounce an ...


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An understandable question, as some people might see flippant use of the phrase as blasphemous. "Goodness" is a commonly accepted euphemism in such cases (often used in phrases like "oh my goodness").


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[Some of this is just rationalization, and some speculation, as the word 'Resonation' does not appear to exist in all dictionaries] A 'Resonation' (noun) is an individual instance of the action (verb) 'Resonate' (or, in combination with the verb 'to be', e.g., 'is Resonating', or 'will Resonate'). 'Resonance' (noun) could also be used to substitute for '...


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The proper word for this is ourself, which is the singular reflexive pronoun corresponding to we, because each of us is a singular construction, even though us is first person plural. This word is in the Lexico dictionary (although it is not used very often): ourself: first person plural Used instead of “ourselves,” typically when “we” refers to people in ...


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Short of including the somewhat clunky himself / herself form, the only really "correct" version here is the "gender-neutral"... Each one of us thinks about themself1 all the time. Even native speakers get slightly confused in contexts like OP's example here (see The hidden flaw in “singular they”—what to do about reflexive pronouns?, ...


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Each one of us thinks about oneself all the time. - correct but old-fashioned Each one of us thinks about himself/herself all the time. - correct but clunky Each one of us thinks about ourselves all the time. - incorrect, mixed singular / plural Each one of us thinks about self all the time. - correct but technical or rephrase: We all think about ourselves ...


1

It seems to me that high-level description is somewhat redundant. I know it's possible to have a detailed description, but if description is used on its own, without qualification, I would assume it would be high-level anyway. From Merriam-Webster's definition of description: 1 b : a statement or account giving the characteristics of someone or something : ...


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"There are several recommendations I have to further improve the sites — all of them to improve their profit, and decrease their cost."


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"Persona" could be used that way. It's meaning is, more or less, confined to the projected character, which according to Cambridge online is often a distinct entity from the real character. However, since your question seems to point more to the perceived image than the real character that is hidden inside, it is a fitting word. The projected ...


0

You would say: I didn’t get those shoes because they were pretty bulky. The pair I got are pretty bulky themselves. You clearly got these shoes not those shoes. Similarly, you might say: I’ve misplaced a pair of my favorite shoes. I wonder where they are. or No thanks, I already have a pair of shoes. Great, I can’t wait to see them! You wouldn’t say ...


1

As I studied the origins of grammar in the 18c, I came to understand that most English grammars originated with classical (Greek and Latin) scholars, who attempted to shoehorn English into similar grammatical patterns (declensions, conjugations, mood, tense, voice, number, gender, etc.). One sticking point was to define what is a consonant, what a vowel. ...


0

Heavy as a dead minister Heard this just now in Bryson's 'Notes from a Big Country' who gives it a New England origin or at least relatively recent common usage in New England, specifically New Hampshire early to mid-20th century. Meanwhile, this radio show describes the phrase as originating in 19th century Kentucky with the first occurrence in a newspaper....


0

Giving 110% Giving 110% is an expression that is defined as giving all that one has plus more. An example of giving 110% is an employee who comes in early every day, finishes other peoples' tasks and is always the last to leave the office. Your Dictionary


-1

The correct form appears to be "Look whose birthday it is today?". "At" is no used before wh- grammatical words (pronouns and determiners) but maybe not all. This is justified by OALD, look 3. Look what a beautiful chair they brought us! Look at whichever they've marked off and decide whether you like them.


0

There is a word fit to express this idea; let's recapitulate what it is: the reaction is found to be one of indulgence and then it is found to be excessive, inordinate. You might say that the people are given to overindulgence.


4

This is really about law, not English, but easy enough. In US law, not only is a defendant allowed to remain silent, but the fact that he/she remained silent cannot be used against them at a trial. For example, at the time of trial, if the defendant claims they were with someone when the crime happened, the prosecution is not allowed to say "well why ...


0

Here is an Ngram chart of "web page" (blue line) versus "web pages" (red line) versus "webpage" (green line) versus "webpages" (yellow line) for the period 1980–2019: As you can see, the two-word versions of these terms were strongly favored from roughly 1995 through about 2009 in the published documents included in ...


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My consideration: asset. Definition of asset: a useful or valuable thing or person. Now, let's break it down. asset is not a less of jargon than medium or content, but it is a common word, which people are using in a day to day life. Also, given the system is about storing valuable media, sharing its idea, I think asset would signify a bit of the meaning ...


0

This question seems to be very closely linked to 1 word for books, videos, podcasts, speeches, etc. (learning materials). Since this question is asking for something other than idea, and it seems that the two questions are in a kind of lockstep, I believe the word that fits better than idea here, and which will also lead to a suitable answer to the other ...


0

How about stuff? From Lexico: stuff: Matter, material, articles, or activities of a specified or indeterminate kind that are being referred to, indicated, or implied. You could use stuff to describe one's books, videos, articles, podcasts, movies, music, artwork, etc. You could say, "Add your stuff", "Find your stuff", "My stuff&...


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After comments under my original answer that clarify the question, I have had to change my answer. The context for this is provided in the question Different word for “idea” in book, videos, articles, podcasts, movies, music, artwork, etc.? In that question, it asks for a different word for idea. As such, this answer and that answer are in a kind of ...


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One of the senses of content is a pretty close match. 1.4 Information made available by a website or other electronic medium.         ‘online content providers’ Lexico From a different source (which expands content beyond online mediums): In publishing, art, and communication, content is the information and experiences that are directed toward an end-user ...


0

It's not incorrect, but redundant. Either means one or the other so it would be more polished, but still somewhat stilted, saying: either bore no fruit. Or if you want it more succinctly, using neither: neither bore fruit. But in keeping with the flow of your sentence, much rather: neither of which bore fruit.


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First: A: “Why is that man looking at that car? B(i): “I don’t know… perhaps he is a policeman.” B(ii): “I don’t know… maybe he is a policeman.” B(iii): “I don’t know… he may be a policeman.” Are all, in current English, semantically identical: they all mean B(iv): “I don’t know… My guess is that he is a policeman.” or "There is some probability that he ...


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