New answers tagged

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As a Newfoundlander I would say that person goes *overboard*. Which has a few meaning variations, but can be used to reference one who has overextended themselves. Which segues nicely into overextend as in to overextend oneself - to go beyond your capabilities or your limits. From there let the synonym train take you where you need to go. Overreach ...


-1

If it had a positive connotation, it would be dedicated. A dedicated or committed partier would be a party animal, which has a neutral connotation. Someone inconsiderate, and incautious is reckless. If you want to describe someone completely inconsiderate of boundaries in achieving a goal, I found kamikaze, which according to OED is a person who acts ...


1

Collocations, and in the limiting cases fixed expressions/idioms, are to a greater or lesser degree non-patterning. Synonyms are only interchangeable over certain areas of usage [a]. You can have strong tea and a powerful computer, but 'powerful tea' and a 'strong computer' would in most circumstances sound so unusual as to be unacceptable. [b] You can ...


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OVERVIEW: Expression Diagram: operand operand operand | | | expression: X = A + B | | operator operator DEFINITIONS: OPERATORS : operators are symbols that allow the user to instruct the computer to preform ...


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The phrase "equally wrong" implies that neither action is "good" and neither action is "worse" then the other. "Equally wrong" can be contrasted with the phrase " the lesser of two evils". In the former, there is no basis for choosing one over the other. In the latter, "lesser" is a basis for choice.


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The publishers would only be worried about the prices of publications if the market was weak, if the market was robust they would be able to sell almost anything at a profit. The problem the publishers faced was finding enough material to satisfy the demand. The situation was something like the market in internet businesses in the late 1990s and early 2000s. ...


1

While under and below are generally synonymous - and either example given would be acceptable and understood within the confines of a written form, say - the nuance in meaning is more apparent if you spoke those sentences aloud to someone who had no idea what you were talking about. While "The marital status box is located below the street address box" ...


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Here's the math way. Set as default = What you see on the screen RIGHT NOW, will become the new setting. Set to default = What the device was set to initially by the manufacturer or programmer (or last teacher, lol) will be restored.


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It is sledding. Same as biking. Biking is not rolling you may say I'm rolling down the street on my bike but it isn't called rolling. Also just like you use a sled you use skates and skating is not sliding you may be sliding on the ice but it is skating.


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The most appropriate terms seem to be found in the world of psychology and attachment disorders. I am not a psychologist or otherwise trained and am not diagnosing your family member. So, caveats being given, an appropriate term would seem to be Compulsive caretaker This section in 'Addiction as an Attachment Disorder' uses the term and includes the ...


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Your description is great. Very colourful. I don't think a single word can do it justice. Fusspot is weak and rather childish. The only expression I can think of with any teeth is mother hen. There's an accompanying pseudo-scientific 'mother hen syndrome'. Maybe the reason we don't have a truly venomous name for such people is that they probably can't ...


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I am glad to see so much interest around the two words candid and honest. However, it may be that we have not address the meaning of this two words in the ears of our listeners, because the words without the context are not meaningful. Are we conscious of the fact that the words will stay with our recipients maybe for their life time? Are we aware of the ...


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What about fussing over someone? Although it doesn't quite capture all of the examples you have given. Here is another definition of the same, which includes more examples.


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Merriam-Webster gives two definitions: to make drunk : INTOXICATE and to exhilarate or stupefy as if by liquor. (But you should have searched that before posting.)


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Cog traditionally referred to the individual teeth on the cogwheel. Here is the first definition in "cog, n. 2" in the Oxford English Dictionary: One of a series of teeth or similar projections on the circumference of a wheel, or the side of a bar, etc., which, by engaging with corresponding projections on another wheel, etc., transmit or receive motion. ...


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When they have teeth, my experience is that they’re “gears” (definition 6a/2) or “sprockets” (definition 1), though the latter is contextually specific. A “cog” is one of the teeth on a gear, but “cogwheel” is synonymous with “gear”. When it doesn’t have teeth, and carries a belt, it&...


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Since the term reflexive already refers to what is directed or turned back on itself, smushing it together with the word self doesn't accomplish anything, besides signal intent to move forward. But so does a rear end collision at a red light. No way to get around. And what is happening when an artist refers to a century-old stereotype or a half-century old ...


2

It's informative to see that you too are UK-based and quite probably a Brit. I've heard 'hand off' in its sporting usage, but didn't realise that the transitive multi-word verb (known by many as a transitive 'phrasal verb') hand off is used in the States where hand over is the usual term in the UK. The Cambridge English Dictionary explains [minor ...


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Since you didn't mention that it necessarily needs to start with ignore- prefix, I think the most appropriate word for it is disregard.


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This is the only way I had come to understand it ... in German. I'm aware that there's a huge difference, but I don't ya'll to remain ignorant of the fact. Latin -ans derives present active participles. Therefore, Latin derived English -ant is a doublette of itself: "partly (in adjectival derivations) continuing Middle English -ant, a variant of -and, -end,...


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Oblivion ( Source: Cambridge Dictionary ) the state of being unconscious or lacking awareness of what is happening around you the state of being completely forgotten by the public State of oblivion The person is oblivious about your presence. The person is in a state of oblivion. You are oblivious to the person


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You have two sons so it's better to say "my elder son". If you have three sons, however, you would say "my eldest son" because if you say "my elder son", people will assume you have two sons and not three. As you only have one daughter, it would be wrong if you said "my younger daughter" (as you don't have a daughter that is older than her). You should ...


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In the world of chess problems, we say that the problem published earlier anticipated the one published later. We may also describe the later one as anticipated.


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"The due date" suggests the last possible date that payment can be made (i.e. is due). I would say either: in the event that the issued invoice is not payed by the due date defined on the invoice... (pay any time from now until the date specified) or: in the event that the issued invoice is not paid within 7 days from the date defined on the invoice... (...


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"Too" is correct, and probably the best choice. "As well" would also work. "Also" is not usually used this way (at the end of a sentence).


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I would say "stays fresher for longer". The unspoken but inferred rest of this sentence is ...than if kept out of the fridge. Fresher is being used comparatively.


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"It should be noted that..." is conventionally used in more formal, third-person writing. "Note that" serves almost the same purpose, but is more imperative. Phrasing it as a (strong) suggestion is politer than ordering the reader to notice something, but it's a very subtle connotation that makes no real difference to the meaning of the sentence.


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Stackable is good, and works well for keeping things simple. As an alternative, may I suggest modular?


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I genuinely appreciate the fact that your intuition professes this to be ungrammatical. Grammarly has a really good, in-depth article on when to use which at https://www.grammarly.com/blog/which-vs-that/. Replacing that with which in this sentence renders the sentence nonsensical. If you have to use which in the sentence nonetheless, use the below ...


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If you really can't think of anything, imagine their expression and describe that (maybe their eyebrows are doing something, or their eyes are bright or sad or their mouth is in a line, ect.) This might not be helpful, but: Sympathetic Offended Pained Whistful Indignant is a good one though (you could say "Character A gave B a look, indignant on his/her ...


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Translate this last phrase and write your answer about it in the comment section, please


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Sometimes, I find that when the end of one of my sentences is too long, the whole sentence should be tightened. I like to think of my text as a tweet that must convey everything with no characters wasted. Thus, in your case, I came up with: Revising Prose explores how to write clearer and concise writing. I took out "simpler" as I felt that was implied. ...


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a) The phrase is grammatical b) The phrase is not idiomatic There is tension between these two statements, if grammaticality is to be derived descriptively from idiomatic usage. I'd not be surprised to see it from a native speaker, anyhow. The only problem is that various alternatives exist, that might seem preferable: comment-section instead of comments; ...


5

The term most appropriate for the concept, in my experience, is publishing frequency or just frequency. This is supported by the WikiProject Magazines Infobox template, which uses the term "frequency" to describe how often a magazine is published. It is also used more generally by blogs or any other outlet that produces written media on a certain schedule. ...


0

You’ve actually got the basics, but the wording is a bit off... Eat up, don’t be shy!


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"I can ask you any question, and you will answer?" This sentence sound unnatural to me. I think a better choice would be: Will you answer any questions I may have?


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One finds usages such as this from Shimmer, by B.J. Robertson, page 25: Now you eat. I do not stand on formality. Or this from Faith, by Donald Eaton, page 97: Eat up. We do not stand on formality here. As Jalene commented above, 'stand on ceremony' is also possible (e.g. in Just Maagy by Virginia Stringer, page 19.) The girl is hungry and we have ...


3

Since being polite in the West would mean that you should accept whatever food you're offered, the exact opposite happens and people end up eating a meal that they don't like out of politeness! Hence, I don't think there's an exact equivalent for this in English. The closest word I can think of is coy (adj. someone who pretends not to want something). ...


0

It can be a case of verbing, but using trip for the sense of travelling or going on a trip is non-standard and would be strange (see @EdwinAshworth's comment for other formulations that may be strange). Trip is also a standard verb, meaning to (make someone) fall due to an obstacle, to switch on/off an electronic circuit, to move with quick light steps and ...


1

Honestly, I think that the most suitable word here is "convince". According to Lexico, the definition is as follows: convince transitive verb 1 Cause (someone) to believe firmly in the truth of something. So, you would be able to say, "I'm trying to convince people to become climate activists".


1

Convert is fine. But if you want something else, try “reformed” though its not less religious. Just don’t let religion stymie your language. Its a losing battle man.


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Ignore Jim101. Its not what i would go for, but all that matters is you and your fiancé/wife understand it. No one else reading that will get it off the bat. The reason being toasts are not proper sentences and make sense in context of a raised glass. Not on a ring. But who will see it and why do you care what anyone other than your intended thinks?


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Posting an answer in 2020 since the question — and accepted answer — date back to 2011 and I believe some things might have changed between now and then. While “gals” is technically be the feminine version of “guys”, I would recommend avoiding it if at all possible. This is especially true in business and professional settings where people are not ...


1

"versatile" seems like what you're looking for. from Collins, adjective, definition 2 "A tool, machine, or material that is versatile can be used for many different purposes. e.g. Never before has computing been so versatile."


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With apologies to the Rhythm Aces then the Amazing Rhythm Aces (and the many who followed singing "Third Rate Romance"), how about "low-rent rendezvous?"


-1

Leading Question. Used in court in cross examination in order to force specific answers from witnesses or suspects.


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Though Lexico includes the religious sense in the definition of proselyte proselyte noun A person who has converted from one opinion, religion, or party to another. it is possibly so unusual that that sense is backgrounded. Indeed, Lexico lists it second. Years ago, the following narrower sense was most common (though not very common): 1....


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