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A simple sentence may convey almost the same: I should have taken a shower by now.


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past due Okay, so Anderson has been rising for a while now. Maybe it’s past due that I included him in my weekly column here. (New Arena) I love lolcats, so it's past due that I made my own featuring our very own Tilly. (blog)


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It's about time (idiom) Informal —Used to say often in an annoyed way that something should have happened sooner It's about time you got here. I've been waiting for over an hour! "They're getting married." "Well, it's about time! m-w


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"High time" in this context seems more like a pun than formality. I suggest I badly need a shower. Lexico has badly ADVERB 2.1 Very much or intensely.


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If you want to go colloquial, perhaps "I really need a shower" would do the trick.


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Speaks to is the only phrase that the financial newscasters use...it is boring already....just is the phrase going forward, duh


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Why students must use timetables for themself? I think the biggest reason to use a timetable is because of being disciplined. For example when you have to get into society to find a job or look for an opportunity to do something. You must plan to do it. And by developing planning when you are a student > in the progress such as making your own timetable ...


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It depends on the meaning of "rozliczenie/rozrachuneck". If the Polish words mean bills or, more usually, invoices which have been received in the period but not all of which have paid then the correct translation is "billings" or "invoicing". If, on the other hand, the Polish words refer only to bills which have been paid then ...


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"Nourish" is a more matter of fact term, plainly meaning "to provide in sufficient amount what is necessary for survival". "Nurture" implies" a more careful process through which the utmost is made so as ensure not only survival but survival along the lines of the best chances for success. I'd opt for the first sentence, ...


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From these definitions and my own sense, test out implies practical testing along the lines of trying out, exploring, or putting something to the test. Testing out may also imply something less formal or rigorous than testing. You might test cameras for a magazine review (with your qualitative and quantitative results) and cursorily test out models at the ...


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I heard "outage" being used in a film set in 1940s England - which led me here. I never heard the term "outage" before this millennium. I have only used and heard "power cut" before, whether the cause was accidental or planned.


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In law you can make a good faith mistake: Good faith mistake means a reasonable judgmental error concerning the existence of facts or law which if true would be sufficient to constitute probable cause. You can also act in bad faith The fraudulent deception of another person; the intentional or malicious refusal to perform some duty or contractual ...


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The Oxford English Dictionary entry indicates that any single digit or any number is called a 'numeral'. For example, one of the entries : 1935 J. O'Hara Appointment in Samarra (U.K. ed.) vii. 197 The little clock had no numerals but only squares of metal where the numerals were supposed to be, expresses the numbers one to twelve as 'numerals'. If the ...


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Each digit (I, V, X etc.) is a 'roman numeral'. The entire number would be described as 'expressed in roman numerals'. I notice, however, that Unicode characters (Ⅷ, ⅺ, Ⅿ etc.) representing entire numbers are described as a 'numeral'.


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Someone reading a game's rules to learn the game needs to learn exactly what thehy may or may not do, and needs to be confident that they have understood the rules correctly. Possibilities abound, for what a reader might consider plausible. So you as author of the rules need to be clear and unambiguous. What might seem obvious to you or to anyone else ...


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Can any university once enrolled or registered any student so that it can cancel enrolment or registeration at any stage without awarding or conferring degree to the student as per rule or Law.


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manipulator (n.) If you describe someone as a manipulator, you mean that they skillfully control events, situations, or people, often in a way that other people disapprove of. Collins manipulate (v.) To manage or utilize skillfully To control or play upon by artful, unfair, or insidious means especially to one's own advantage To change by artful or unfair ...


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One possibility is an opportunist NOUN A person who takes advantage of opportunities as and when they arise, regardless of planning or principle. Not necessarily incompetent, they are opportunists who seize the chance to make lots of money for doing relatively little work. There are opportunists who think of Diwali as a way to make a buck and sell it as a ...


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Complicit. Helping to commit a crime or do wrong in some way. Describes individuals who are “folded together” metaphorically.


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Howzzabout "equally culpable"? Culpability [Middle English coupable, from Old French, from Latin culpābilis, from culpāre, to blame, from culpa, fault.] The mediator found both parties to be equally culpable.


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It depends on the intended goal of your writing. If your goal is to entertain an English-speaking audience with mixed idiomatic expressions, then it's perfectly fine. Cf. High Performance Mark's comment about Monty Python. If your goal is to informally communicate that Young Lensky is dead, then it is redundant. Your message would be clearer if you select ...


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You can say "This year, I got into the habit of having my blood tested regularly."


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reissue (v.) Make a new supply or different form of (a product, especially a book or record) available for sale. The book was reissued with a new epilogue. Lexico To issue (something, esp. printed or recorded matter) again, frequently in a different form. OED reissue (n.) The second or renewed issuing of something, esp. of a book, record, film, or other ...


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Strunk & White advocate for minimal communications. Adding in irrelevant information only clouds the message. The house is a bit impersonal, but probably more correct. "It the second house on the right"


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I think you are trying to come up with the word inadvertent. That’s how I use the word anyway, some may say that’s wrong but it’s like this.. I messaged a guy I haven’t talked to in a long time and out last exchange was super awkward. When we established that it was me texting him and this is my new number’ He says “okay cool, so what else is new” He is ...


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'Based on my personal experience' yields both an in-depth air while keeping a humble tone.


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"Come across" connotes a particular happenstance, usually without much meaning about one's internal state or reaction to it. You can definitely use "drawn to" for a topic. One can imagine using them together, like As a child, Mike Duncan came across Gibbon's books at a relative's house. As Duncan read them, he found that he was drawn to ...


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[Why was] "ate" was chosen to be used as opposed to its present-tense counterpart (eat). It is reported speech. Your mum actually said "Why don't you just eat a banana?"


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"Approach" implies a hands-on style. "Perspective" is more theoretical. "Paradigm" is similar to perspective, but implies that some specific model will be used, i.e., it will be a "systematic" perspective. What's your approach to saving money? (How do you do it?) What's your perspective on saving money? (How do you ...


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troll (v.) To troll a song, to roll it out with rise and fall of the voice [probably the equivalent of Swiss tralallen, to sound notes without words—from a representation of the notes by the syllables tra-la-la]. United Editors Encyclopedia and Dictionary (1907) To troll or trowl a song may be to roll it out with rise and fall of voice, but it is more ...


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Try ululate which Merriam-Webster (online) defines as an intransitive verb meaning to utter a loud, usually protracted, high-pitched, rhythmical sound especially as an expression of sorrow, joy, celebration, or reverence offering the sample usages eight singers took to the aisle, dancing with ferocious energy as the chorus sang, ululated and clapped in an ...


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I'd call them "trading partners" or "trading parties". If you are building a software, and these parties are the users of your application, the you could call them just "users".


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naive: 2a. deficient in worldly wisdom or informed judgment 2b. not previously subjected to experimentation or a particular experimental situation


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Instead of 'game panel' I would call it the 'arena'.


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Since the OP has said that ... Athing even remotely related would be appreciated., I suggest Rube Goldberg Ingeniously or unnecessarily complicated in design or construction. Rather than going about things in a straightforward manner, she devises stratagems, the complexities of which are analogous to the workings of a Rube Goldberg project. [Lexico]


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rabbit hole: ...in which the pursuit of something (such as an answer or solution) leads to other questions, problems, or pursuits quagmire: a difficult, precarious, or entrapping position


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Boondoggle: A boondoggle is a project that is considered a waste of both time and money, yet is often continued due to extraneous policy or political motivations. "A waste of both time and money" is the worst case, and the Wikipedia article goes on to mention some "successful boondoggles". Also, boondoggles are frequently associated ...


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