New answers tagged

1

Yes, it can be a noun, like if I were to say: "And can be a noun— no ifs, ands, or buts!" "No ifs, ands, or buts" is a common expression. With that in mind, it's obvious the word "and" can be a noun because the word "and" has been pluralized. Conjunctions don't have a plural case. Nouns do. "And" being the ...


3

The Oxford English Dictionary lists "and" as conjunction, adverb, and noun. The adverb is labeled "obsolete". Ye shall see and what somewhat I have in my sacke. The noun could be an instance of the word "and" ifs, ands or buts Also the noun "and" may mean the boolean operation AND.


4

Yes, it is not a conjunction when it becomes a noun (or other) in usage or function. Normally... And is a conjunction, except for when it is being quoted as a word. -Cambridge As @Mitch mentions in a comment, See Use-mention distinction. In short, 'and' is a conjunction, but " 'and' " is word that means a conjunction, which may seem like caviling ...


3

I've seen a version of this with five "and"s; here is my reconstruction of it from memory: You painted this sign for me, but you need to repaint it. The spaces between Fish and and and and and Chips are not the same size.


0

The English conjunction but is not a negative, nor does it imply opposition. It is in fact the same logical conjunction as and -- any sentence that is true with but will also be true with and substituted for but. Frank left but Mary stayed behind = Frank left and Mary stayed behind. Logicians ignore the difference profitably: there is a logical functor ...


0

The nearest sense of but I've found in any dictionary is one given by Lexico: Used to introduce a response expressing a feeling such as surprise ... anger [esteem, satisfaction, even smugness]. But that's an incredible saving! We did not know what to expect, but what a fantastic surprise night, it was a real thrill. Here, but is used in the 'contrasting ...


2

An examination of the following Google pages, "not by force, but (by) X…X", "not by words, but (by) X…X", "not by chance, but (by) X…X" "not by law, but (by) X…X", "not by accident, but (by) X…X" "not by nature, but (by) X…X", permits the following conclusion: the ellipsis is rare, in almost all ...


Top 50 recent answers are included