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Young's Literal Bible (1862) - a very literal rendering of the original Hebrew - translates the verse as follows : For Jehovah is knowing the way of the righteous and the way of the wicked is lost. Green's Literal (1993) is almost exactly the same : For Jehovah is knowing the way of the righteous and the way of the wicked shall perish. Textus ...


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Hebrew poetry makes up one-third of the Old Testament. At the "Introduction to Hebrew Poetry" page, the author describes the general characteristics: A. It is very compact. B. It tries to express truth, feelings or experiences in imagery. C. It is primarily written not oral. It is highly structured. This structure is expressed in: ...


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since nobody is interested in answering my question, I would like to answer my self.I have referred to some research papers and found answer to my question. According to Robert B kaplan the use is called "Antithetic parallelism. Mr Robert gives the explanation for it and it is given below "The idea stated in the first part is emphasized by the ...


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Although is a more proactive word then though, they mean the same thing but saying although, gets your attention much better then just saying though


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That's pretty much it. The two are practically interchangeable; however, care must be taken when using though because it has several other uses.


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"Though" is an interchangeable conjunction with "even though" and "although", and even though it sounds weird to some, the first usage (1.) is correct, while the usage with the semi-colon is debatable. Examples 3 and 4 are both correct. In 3, you have the appositive set off by commas, either because of a pause or because of its lack of restrictiveness, or ...


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Could it be a question of phonetics? In wouldn't, we know that we have to insert a "schwa" or "mid central vowel", IPA ə, i.e. the most non-descript vowel possible, and very common in English, somewhere. In wouldn't this sound doesn't actually come where the apostrophe is, but instead between the d and the n. The reason for putting it where it is references ...


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Since, in a contraction, the apostrophe denotes removed letters, and the word and has been contracted to n by removing both the a and the d, the correct written form would be: 'n'


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