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When using "their" as a gender-neutral singular pronoun, should a noun that follows be singular or plural?

Like many others have mentioned, "hand" would only apply if they used one hand! Oddly enough though, you would say "They are", unlike "He/She/It/(Name) is", as "They ...
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Usage of the phrase "to which" in this mathematical explanation

This is a case where mathematics is assisted by precise English usage. I will tease it apart and try to illustrate with a specific example. A is a set of elements. B is a second set of elements. f  is ...
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Which is correct? Everyone do or does

Your second sentence actually goes like this: Everybody, do this problem. You are calling for everyone's attention before telling them to do this problem. Your last sentence can be changed to this: ...
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What does “them” mean in this passage?

The subject of the subordinate clause "to reduce their waistlines by smearing them with Chinese herbs, dousing them with alcohol and then setting light to them" is "[the slimmers'] ...
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Use of "myself" in business-speak

Far from being appropriate in more formal situations, non-reflexive use of ‘myself’, being ungrammatical, sticks out as ungrammatical and thus, informal. Anytime I hear a non-reflexive use of ‘myself’,...
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"Most of you would do the right thing if you/they knew"

I think it depends on what the speaker means. "Most of you would do the right think if you knew," indicates that the speaker is referring to the audience for the entire sentence; meaning ...
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1 vote

Which one is correct to say: "It's me" or "It's I"?

The war and the battles for It is I as opposed to It is me, have been going on for a long time. Old English did not use the object me after the verb to be. We said ic sylf hit eom (I self it am – it ...
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Origin of "they", "them", and "their"

It is the impact of the Norse settlement in England and the fact that modern English is not directly rooted in the Wessex version of standard old English. After Normans conquered England they moved ...
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When can I use "with" + object + adjective (example: "with him dead")?

with + person or pronoun or object + past participle or adjective or noun is an idiomatic usage. Merriam Weber says this: c—used as a function word to indicate a result attendant on a specified action ...
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What time or which time?

Maybe we use "what" instead of "which" because, even if we consider Time a definite value (we mostly stop dividing Time at the minutes; very rarely we talk about seconds or ...
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