21

The phrase English language and usage is an example of the syntactic phenomenon called Conjunction Reduction, which omits repeated lexical material in conjoined clauses. Thus, English language and usage is a reduction, by rule, of English language and English usage This is an ordinary kind of conjunction reduction; English need not be repeated. Note, ...


17

It looks like a combination of two standard phrase forms: set a-verb, which means simply to start the operation of the verb. For example, to set a-flutter is to start {something} fluttering. This form often seems to diminish or trivialise the verb. saber rattling (or sabre rattling), which means to deliberately telegraph a threat, or otherwise communicate ...


16

The most correct long form of the title of this stack is even longer than your disharmonious suggestion: English Language & English Language Usage This stack is for the discussion of the English language as well as discussion of the usage of the English language.


7

"...but experience, (while) teaching this over a number of years, convinced me..." "Teaching" is merely part of a subordinate adjectival clause, qualifying "experience". The "while" has been elided but can easily be put back in if it makes you more comfortable.


5

Sabre-rattling (or saber in American English) is an idiom with the sense of 'rattling one's sword in its scabbard as though threatening to draw it' https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/sabre-rattling Here, the writer has turned the phrase round. The meaning seems to be 'made them behave in a threatening manner' rather than a reference to ...


5

My original purpose was to write an undergraduate text on digital communication, but experience teaching this material over a number of years convinced me that I could not write an honest exposition of principles, including both what is possible and what is not possible, without losing most undergraduates. There is no way for "experience" to be a noun ...


3

Your main verb in the second half of the conditional is would save. That verb is transitive here, but its direct object is not me! Rather me is the indirect object, and its direct object is the entire nonfinite verb phrase phoning her, where her is in turn the direct object of the verb phoning. In other words, the apodosis (the “then” part, a finite ...


2

We cannot analyze one syntactic form as another one. Each grammatical form is defined by a set of criteria that makes it distinguishable from another one. So, a preposition cannot be an adjective, a noun cannot be a verb etc. Grammatical forms can be distributionally/functionally comparable or similar in certain syntactic contexts, but one cannot be the ...


2

Experience is just a noun here. Insert my in front of it to get a better read: . . . but my experience teaching this material convinced me . . . Teaching this material over a number of years is a gerund phrase restrictive appositive for the noun experience. Experience = teaching. You can look at it like this: . . . but experience teaching this ...


2

... but (experience (teaching this material) over a number of years) convinced me that ...


1

Yeah, you've hit on a weird quirk of English grammar here (modern German does similar things, I think). You have three ideas here. 1) Pregnancy has stirred up feelings. 2) The feelings existed. 3)I didn't know that fact. Combining the last two, you get "I didn't know that the feelings existed." You can leave out the subordinating conjunction "that" in ...


1

I will refer to the point herrison raised in his post regarding the interpretation of the ing clause in the original sentence: My original purpose was to write an undergraduate text on digital communication, but experience teaching this material over a number of years convinced me that I could not write an honest exposition of principles, including ...


1

Gerunds have an ambiguous part of speech. Within their own local phrase they are verbs, but outside that phrase they behave as nouns. In your example, "phoning" is head of the noun phrase "phoning her", which in turn is object of the understood preposition "from". Yet within the phrase "phoning her", "phoning" is a verb with the direct object "her". (...


1

The sentence from the OP illustrates the use of a highly versatile and common syntactic construction, which in simple terms can be described as: Predicate + Main Clause. Here's another sentence illustrating this syntactic pattern: "A long-time favorite of critics, Timothy Oliphant is set to win this year's Oscar. " The introductory noun phrase : "A ...


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