6

What's wrong with this sentence? Nothing... “The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars / But in ourselves, ….” (Shakespeare: Julius Caesar, Act I, Scene III, L. 140-141). The things that are “wrong” with it are those that you have not encountered before. There is nothing wrong with the use of English: Flood = the flood tide; the incoming tide; the rising ...


5

to come to and wait for the turn of the tide. "to come to" is also a nautical term. Usually the expression is "to heave to" but this relates to the wind direction. In this case the direction of the tide is the deciding factor so the boat will need to "come to". Note that in neither case does the verb "heave to" or &...


3

You are perhaps thinking of "Many a map shows the town" as in 1989 O. S. Card Prentice Alvin iii. 52 That road led through many a village and many a town. and attempting to replace "many" with "few". Unfortunately, this collocation does not exist in English. It would be "Scarce a map..." but this construction is ...


2

As a native speaker, I would be happy to help you with this proofreading process. I agree with your assessment about the removal of the comma after 'those'. Regarding the use of the word 'those' itself, there is no reason to not use it as, in this sense, it kind of means to say 'those people' and the word 'people' is omitted but understood. (Think about the ...


1

The believe the structure you bolded contains what is known as an appositive. An appositive is essentially a noun phrase that modifies another consecutive noun phrase. In your case, "a starfish leaping through the dark" is the appositive while "their locked hands" is the noun being modified. The entire bolded structure is a phrase as it ...


1

It means "only". This is the adverb "but" (OALD). (OALD) There were a lot of famous people there: Lady Gaga and Hugh Jackman, to name but two.


1

Your second interpretation is nearly correct: the team are hampered by the suspension of their key players and the implication is that they are still motivated. However, even if they are not motivated, the speaker says that the suspension is the cause of the poor performance. "...not just because they have lost motivation..." doesn't just suggest ...


1

Removing the "be" leaves a reasonable sentence, if we assume that "these mistakes" refers to a class of mistakes ("such mistakes") and not to some individual noted errors.


1

Yes, lot means destiny here (one's 'lot in life'). [He looked like] a man who had always been in the pleasant situation of being able to command and be obeyed.


1

Both are grammatical, but have slightly different meanings. The one you probably want is do: there the object is the whole clause people do that little run. There's an implied complementiser, such as that or how. If you use doing, then the object is people [doing that little run], i.e. a noun phrase which contains a participal clause. But the import is that ...


1

The phrase as of late is generally used in the same sense as the words recently or lately. This diction would fit best when, perhaps, inquiring (a person) of their recent state of being. Example: "How have you been as of late?" can be used when asking how a person has been lately. Another common usage of the phrase as of late is "You've been ...


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