New answers tagged

2

They are very similar, but it's a matter of adjusting expectations. "Quiet" could imply talking in soft voices so as not to disturb others, while "silent" suggests no talking at all, and similarly for other noise-making activities. In practice people will tend to do more than the term would suggest, so saying "silent" implies &...


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What are the top-10 reviewers, in terms of the absolute number of reviews marked as useful by other users, of Nightlife businesses in Urbana-Champaign? This is saying that from the Yelp dataset, you need to select those reviews of the "Nightlife businesses" (presumably a category of review types) in Urbana-Champaign (a location in the set). From ...


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I can't fully support articulating a potential for one person to capture and then express the persona of another, but how about: Google Dictionary: Encapsulate - verb: encapsulate; 3rd person present: encapsulates; past tense: encapsulated; past participle: encapsulated; gerund or present participle: encapsulating To: express the essential features of (...


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“He’s so unoriginal, it’s like he’s trying to replicate his father.” Also duplicate, carbon-copy, re-create, reincarnate, etc.


-1

It is often used by students from their subcategories, I read this in a post https://gossipbucket.com/special/1668468/how-gossiping-influences-communication-between-students/ Of course, many do not understand the meaning, but they use it often. This is the problem of youth)) They say what they do not understand)


1

"Concerning Hobbits", the first section of the prologue of The Fellowship of the Ring, from which the quotation in the question was taken, begins: This book is largely concerned with Hobbits, and from its pages a reader may discover much of their character and a little of their history. Further information will also be found in the selection from ...


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I don't have my Tolkein right in front of me, but I would interpret this to mean that Tolkein has already given a very brief description of the people of Middle Earth (or maybe just Hobbits) and postulates that many readers might want to know more right away rather than jumping right into the story narrative. I interpret "from the outset" to mean ...


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The phrase from the outset doesn't imply that the readers have no prior knowledge at all. In fact, the definiteness of the phrase this remarkable people shows that the people in question have already been mentioned, and so the reader does in fact know something about them (at least that they exist, if nothing else). The phrase from the outset refers to the ...


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After puzzling over this phrase for quite some time I came across the possible answers offered in this site. The one that seemed to show the most promising solution was the longest entry, which included the possibility of there being a verb “to lam” meaning “to run.” I found just such a verb in the English Dialect Dictionary, a somewhat now forgotten, yet ...


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Whether there is anything 'inelegant' about if and when is a matter of taste. Those who dislike it probably do so because it reminds them of the overly pedantic way of writing that is typical of legal documents. But the remedy for that is simple: if what is one is writing is not a legal document, one can simply use either if or when; one usually doesn't need ...


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All-inclusive, as in hotel Google, define all inclusive: including everything or everyone, i.e. "an all-inclusive holiday" Denoting or relating to a holiday in which all or most meals, drinks, and activities are included in the overall price The all-inclusive model originated in the French Club Med resorts, which were founded by the Belgian Gérard ...


-1

I would go with "old school". Not exact. But fits the sentence without added complexity of determining if an idea is false. A colleague joked, at one point, that things would have gone better in the pandemic if we still believed in old school "get some fresh air".


3

how could one family have two dynasty? You're misinterpreting the passage. The Kushans were a culture/society that formed an empire in India. It says that there were two families that formed two separate ruling dynasties. The first was the Kadphises and the second was the Kanishka. The Kanishka directly followed on from the Kadphises, therefore they are ...


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“Choose and lose” refers to a multiple choice test. We used that back in the ‘70’s and ‘80’s when I was in school. Another term with the same meaning is “multiple guess”.


2

A recent coinage for the concept you raise is epistemic innocence. This term comes from the interdisciplinary Project PERFECT, which investigates whether false beliefs (especially delusions, distorted memories, and beliefs that don't reflect social realities) could have positive effects. When inaccurate beliefs do convey a benefit, they may possess epistemic ...


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Bumping this thread – it seems like there isn't a consensus on either being appropriate to describe going on a long side tangent. Is there another phrase besides rat holes and rabbit holes that would be accurate?


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The example you provided is good if you add in a word or phrase that would make it flow better. Depending on the context, you can try one of the following: Then the merchant receives the order details containing no invoice, no refund, but only a/the cancellation. Then the merchant receives the order details containing no invoice, no refund, but indeed a/...


2

Google Ngrams for as was wrote,as was writ,as is wrote,as is writ shows a fair number of examples of all forms between 1800 and c.1920. After that date, and to the present, there are far fewer. In the majority of later instances the use of wrote and writ as passive past participles is usually to demonstrate uneducated speech, however, there are a few ...


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Maybe as a single word means perhaps. There are many contexts in which may and be can be used in the same sentence. This may be the last time I will go there. I may be wrong, but...


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The proper punctuation is "But, although you hate me now, I believe that you will forgive me over time." (With a comma after "But".) The phrase "although you hate me now" is a "parenthetical" (an expression which can be omitted without changing the syntax), and it should be set off by commas in normal usage.


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Martial Law might be described as the power the government declares in unstable times or in emergencies.


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Another possibility would be hegemony: from Webster's Encylopedic Unabridged Dictionary of the English Language, p. 887. Leadership or predominant influence exercised by one nation over others, as in a confederation. Leadership; predominance. Aggression or expansionism by large nations in an effort to achieve world domination. Orson Scott Card makes ...


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To "answer the call," it means to metaphorically look within, and follow, what you refer to as "your gut" "your soul" or "your heart" is willing you to do. Take a chance, and lean into what you understand not.


2

There is a simple word for such a group: it would be a junta So, for example, the military dictatorship in Greece between 1967 and 1974 came to power by means of a military coup. Most such regimes are of limited duration. Some, like the Soviet Union' Communist Government, lasted longer and was however grudgingly referred to as the government. Even that ...


2

The short answer is "I wish you a good recovering Saturday" is garbage and completely non-idiomatic. The long answer is that the "-ing" form as a participle adjective has the adjectival effect of "that which verbs" and as a gerund has the effect of "associated with". Thus 1 As a participle adjective: A "marking ...


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I think it may be an editing mistake. It could be a) a failed attempt to introduce the term 'more or less' or 2) a change of wording to include the word 'uncertainty' without correcting the preceding words i.e., either the word 'more' or the word 'less'should have been removed before print. I'd go for removing the word 'more' because the first part of the ...


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And there's a lot more less uncertainty. It's not standard English, and not an idiomatic expression. It sounds like some politician trying to weasel-word their statement to sound more positive when the actual prospect is quite bleak. The last time I heard this phraseology used convincingly was : "Less is More" Used to express the view that a ...


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We have accepted adjective-noun phrases in English, such as "small talk" and "big business." The purpose of an adjective is to qualify a noun. All adjective + noun phrases are acceptable and always have been. Not all make sense, but nevertheless, they are acceptable. Johnson said,"There's a lot more hope. And there's a lot more ...


1

I am no native speaker but I don't see that as an approach to establish a new phrase and neither as a adjective-noun phrase. Instead the "more less" paradox is the unusual part of the sentence and therefore the construction to focus on (with more used as an adverb to describe the increased form of less). [I really hope it is an adverb, it would be ...


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“Dodged the bullet” is a phrase used in this context. dodge a bullet or less commonly dodge the bullet to narrowly avoid an unwelcome, harmful, or disastrous outcome or occurrence coastal towns dodged a bullet when the hurricane veered out to sea https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dodge%20the%20bullet The 20th century geopolitical example is ...


1

This doesn't answer your question directly, but the concept you described seems related to "survivorship bias." Survivorship bias or survival bias is the logical error of concentrating on the people or things that made it past some selection process and overlooking those that did not, typically because of their lack of visibility. This can lead to ...


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It's better if you say: "My colleague had a bit of an accident on his way to work and got himself injured. So I took out the first aid kit and patched him up as well as I could." or as in your second sentence: "Mike really wanted to make her birthday special and he went all out for the party. He baked the cake, prepared the food and drinks, ...


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I’m not sure that “appropriate” is generally used in the context you’re looking for but that is the first thing that came to mind.


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The word clone originally had a very specific scientific and technical meaning but now has an informal meaning defined by the Cambridge online dictionary as: someone or something that looks very much like someone or something else: with the example : Most people saw her as just another blond-haired, red-lipped Marilyn Monroe clone. You could, therefore ...


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Especially in the context of theater, we can say methodize. As Wordhippo defines it, methodize is: To perform a theatrical role in accordance with the principles of method acting. Where method acting is defined as: An acting technique in which the actor fully immerses themselves into the character they are playing. or, in Merriam Webster: capitalized: a ...


2

emulate or impersonate. emulate: to copy something achieved by someone else and try to do it as well as they have. impersonate: to intentionally copy another person's characteristics, such as their behavior, speech, appearance, or expressions, especially to make people laugh. source - Cambridge Dictionary hope this helps you.


0

Hard to say. It could mean: If you think I love you, you've caught the wrong idea and should keep trying for a better thought. If you think I love you, keep trying and I might come around. If you think I love you, try if you want to but it's hopeless (delivered with sarcasm). I'd probably go for the first one.


0

OED: physiognomy, n. I. The study of appearance. 1. a. The study of the features of the face, or of the form of the body generally, as being supposedly indicative of character; the art of judging character from such study. 1853 C. Brontë Villette I. vii. 125 I want your opinion. We know your skill in physiognomy... Read that countenance. 1915 W. S. ...


1

The general term used in research on the subject is recognition, which is modified to specify the kind of recognition performed: facial recognition, gender recognition (with context used to make clear that they are talking about faces), and facial gender recognition. Here are several examples from titles of articles: A Review of Facial Gender Recognition ...


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Phenotypic analysis, is the scientific term for analysing the physical characteristics of a human or non-human being and reaching a conclusion about their gender, among other things. Nowadays, however, appearances are often deceptive. phenotype definition - "A phenotype is the observable expression of an individual's genotype. Thus, while genotypes ...


0

The OP is probably right in believing that (a) and (b) would better reflect the intentions of their respective writers if for were deleted, but it is difficult to be completely sure about that. In the sense that is relevant here, to provide for X means to create the conditions that make X possible. If X has been provided for, X may or may not actually happen;...


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Not all step mother's are bad, so the words/phrase do not make any sense in any country as lots of good families with step moms exists and the word " step mother treatment" got its popularly negative meaning/concept through movies & tales that spiced up it's stories.


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Movies.SE probably already expects people to know the answer, which is indeed, franchise as suggested in comments. A general title or concept used for creating or marketing a series of products, typically films or television shows. ‘the Harry Potter franchise’ — Lexico


3

Wolfgang Mieder, A Dictionary of American Proverbs (1992) offers a saying that seems to be at least somewhat on point: Pardoning the bad is injuring the good. That is, when a person who does wrong pays no price for the misdeed, the innocent will pay for it instead—presumably either by not receiving restitution for the original wrong done to them or by ...


4

When I was still very young I often used to hear from my elders this Spare the rod and spoil the child Said to mean that if you do not punish a child when they do something wrong, they will not learn what is right [Cambridge Dictionary] Another idiom you might like is give him enough rope and he'll hang himself If one gives someone enough freedom of ...


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