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"Welcome home" is a complete sentence. Welcome serves as an imperative in much the same way as "Stand up" is considered a complete sentence. This is NOT an utterance or an exception to any rule In the book, "Commands: A Cross-linguistic Typology" found on Google books, page 179, the example of "Welcome home" is given as a non-command form of the ...


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It can be a case of verbing, but using trip for the sense of travelling or going on a trip is non-standard and would be strange (see @EdwinAshworth's comment for other formulations that may be strange). Trip is also a standard verb, meaning to (make someone) fall due to an obstacle, to switch on/off an electronic circuit, to move with quick light steps and ...


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I replace it as "just like" in this sentence: “And the princess as a wife, or so rumor says, although gracious Foltest has not proclaimed that.” And I got another question which may help you: Alternatives to "Or so I thought"?


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"Oh boy!" is an informal, predominantly American English, and somewhat outdated expression of surprise or excitement. "Do I love it" is a rhetorical question - that is a question which does not demand an answer, but rather meant to remind the hearer of the answer, or make them reach an obvious conclusion. In this particular example, the speaker clearly does ...


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The most interesting thing for me is to create pictures. First, this is not a phrase; this is a sentence. Phrases are parts of sentences. Second, like all English sentences, it has a subject noun phrase and a predicate verb phrase. The subject noun phrase is the most interesting thing for me and the predicate verb phrase is is to create pictures. ...


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It's a less dramatic version of the doubtless hyperbolic "I'd give my right arm [/hand] to be there." (See, for example, Cambridge Dictionary) The implication is that you'd give up many of your prized possessions / comforts in return for being there (etc). "What [is there that] I wouldn't give [up] to be able to ...?" [implication: the list of what I ...


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Logically, they mean exactly the same thing. But in practice, thy have a slight difference. If someone is being negative, feeling that they can't accomplish what they want, you would respond with something that matches their mood: "nothing is impossible". You deny their negative attitude with another negative. But if someone is being hopeful about what ...


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If you consider one thing can either be possible or not (so symmetry among sets without intersection), you should have the two circles that do not intersect. This implies that "nothing is impossible" differs from "anything is possible"


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