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Quarter - One of the four major divisions of the compass. From unexpected quarter - from unexpected direction.


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Both Malcolmite and anti-Malcolmite are nouns. One refers to followers and supporters of Sir John Malcolm, a British envoy in Persia in the late 1820s, and the other to opponents of Malcolm. "The Malcolmite MacDonald" is Malcolm's brother-in-law, John MacDonald, who, not surprisingly, is a supporter of Malcolm. Edward Ingram, on the other hand, is said to be ...


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It referred to the moment in the actual incident where the elves threatened the Witcher and Geralt basically said "kill me now." As opposed to the bard, who was busy bleating. :)


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Language is fluid. This question is a matter of opinion. My opinion is that the two words are very similar in their current usages; so similar that we can use them interchangably. If some people make a distinction between them, that will be a their opinion. They may be able to cite examples to support their view. I don't assert that my view is ...


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It is worth noting that Urban Dictionary is not really so much a dictionary in any traditional sense as it is a strange game. There are straightforward definitions, but also social commentary, playing with words, etc. The word woke is associated with being pretentious and other non-flattering descriptions not because anyone using the word non-ironically ...


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I realize you're upset but language doesn't exist in a pristine error-correcting code vacuum. People (and companies) say things to each other given past behavior and expecting future behavior and some with authority and those without and etc and etc. This is a particular example of politeness or euphemism of the situation. It's a similar situation to where ...


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Other variants of this structure are Nobody says you can't/have to... It's nowhere written that you can't/have to... They all mean that there may be a perceived mandate forcing certain action - but there actually isn't. It's just in your mind. And as soon as you realise this you enable yourself to make a free decision whether or not to go with the ...


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Disclaimer: I don't know this creed so I can only work with the information in the question. The creed associates three progressive steps to the act of killing another being with different parts of the personal structure of the killer. to aim using sight stresses that intention needs to come first and be narrowed down to focus on the target, eliminating ...


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I'm reposting part of my comments so that the poor chap(-ess) asking the question gets a clear answer, free of the extended commentary about the proper interpretation of the word Dame which is all rather beside the point ... Yes, the straightforward interpretation of what you post is that Lee is the name of a place. It may well be the place the dame ...


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To cry out like a sheep. Witcher is the white wolf. He would never say a monster or enemy can't be beaten. in other words, the enemy whom the witcher was fighting cried like a sheep. so cried the witcher He can't be haha..................bleat Cry out in pain...dead enemy/monster.


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IMO, "a"(shows of Avengers (15$/show)) must be 1 and "b"(shows of Inception(25$/show)) must be 5.i.e. 1 * 3 hrs = 3 hrs per day for Avengers, where as 5 * 4 hrs = 20 hrs per day for Inception hence total running hrs will be 3 + 20 = 23, Total Daily collection = (15*1) + (25*5) = 140$ So answer to your question is 6 shows per day so that the theatre owner ...


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You will have looked up flagrant in a dictionary and found that it means blatant or overt. Likewise anarchy: unruliness or disorder; and yearning for: craving, or thirsting for. The word direction is being used here to mean guidance. And in fact the words 'yearning for direction' mean the same as the next words: 'desperate for a guiding hand.' So we've got: ...


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I purchased some drapes which were "cold pigs". They were made to measure drapes and a deposit was made by the person ordering them. However, they did not make a final payment so these then became "cold pigs". A great way to get a bargain.


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In the first sentence people may have come forward: in the second they have.


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Yes - the first states that no witnesses have come forward. The second implies that, though some people have come forward, they don't include anyone with the required information.


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Yes. After making the syntactic and semantic analysis, he have that: First Sentence: Subject: "No-one who remember seeing Bill that Monday" Predicate: "has come forward" Second sentence: Subject: "No-one who has come forward" Predicate: "remembers seeing Bill that Monday"


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As a Newfoundlander I would say that person goes *overboard*. Which has a few meaning variations, but can be used to reference one who has overextended themselves. Which segues nicely into overextend as in to overextend oneself - to go beyond your capabilities or your limits. From there let the synonym train take you where you need to go. Overreach ...


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The impact of these changes becomes discernible upon further exploration of the ways in which Armenian activists exploited and were moved – literally and figuratively – by the turn-of-the-century's time–space compression, as they spread and disseminated revolutionary activity into the neighboring empires. Let's take out the clauses that are irrelevant (to ...


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If you move by in front of the first em dash, the grammar will be in order: The impact of these changes becomes discernible upon further exploration of the ways in which Armenian activists exploited and were moved by – literally and figuratively – the turn-of-the-century's time–space compression, as they spread and disseminated revolutionary ...


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If it had a positive connotation, it would be dedicated. A dedicated or committed partier would be a party animal, which has a neutral connotation. Someone inconsiderate, and incautious is reckless. If you want to describe someone completely inconsiderate of boundaries in achieving a goal, I found kamikaze, which according to OED is a person who acts ...


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Plump would mean something like "fat" or perhaps more metaphorically, bloated, full of himself. Stately would mean something like dignified, ceremonial, lofty.


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Checking dictionaries sometimes helps. transport NOUN 2 (usually transports). An overwhelmingly strong emotion. ‘art can send people into transports of delight’ Lexico


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Could have pp means that something was possible in the past, or you had the ability to do something in the past No, in this case it is expressing uncertainty, as could is a strongly inflected subjunctive form of can. The subjunctive has significantly eroded in English (hence I think this question is relevant for ELU, even if your broken English would almost ...


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... it could be argued that their support could have stemmed from ... That's two could's, one modifying the other; since could indicates possibility, but not probability, each proposition has less than .5 likelihood. Since one composes with the other, the product rule applies, and the resultant likelihood is quite low. Two propositions of likelihood .4, ...


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The phrase "equally wrong" implies that neither action is "good" and neither action is "worse" then the other. "Equally wrong" can be contrasted with the phrase " the lesser of two evils". In the former, there is no basis for choosing one over the other. In the latter, "lesser" is a basis for choice.


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The publishers would only be worried about the prices of publications if the market was weak, if the market was robust they would be able to sell almost anything at a profit. The problem the publishers faced was finding enough material to satisfy the demand. The situation was something like the market in internet businesses in the late 1990s and early 2000s. ...


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Close alternatives would be "might have arisen from" or "could have been caused by". "Stemmed" is being used as a plant metaphor (like "grown" or "blossomed"). It's a verb, but a metaphoric one, so the passive "was really stemmed" doesn't really work - though the active "their support really stemmed" would. It's not so much ambiguous as intentionally vague ...


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This usage is defined at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/stem as intransitive verb : to occur or develop as a consequence : have or trace an origin her success stems from hard work You could rephrase the sentence as On balance, it could be argued that their support could have been because of a nationalist need to counter-balance ...


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Pleased is a word similar to happy, but has a slightly deeper feeling. Satisfied has way more feeling than pleased. He was pleased that Harry answered his question = He felt glad that Harry answered his question He was satisfied with the answer Harry gave him = He felt strongly happy with Harry's answer. Pleased is a synonym of glad as seen above. If you ...


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Incipient- something is in an early stage of existence. "In its incipient form, basketball was played with a soccer ball and peach baskets for goals. Bouncy orange balls and nets came later."


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The most appropriate terms seem to be found in the world of psychology and attachment disorders. I am not a psychologist or otherwise trained and am not diagnosing your family member. So, caveats being given, an appropriate term would seem to be Compulsive caretaker This section in 'Addiction as an Attachment Disorder' uses the term and includes the ...


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Your description is great. Very colourful. I don't think a single word can do it justice. Fusspot is weak and rather childish. The only expression I can think of with any teeth is mother hen. There's an accompanying pseudo-scientific 'mother hen syndrome'. Maybe the reason we don't have a truly venomous name for such people is that they probably can't ...


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What about fussing over someone? Although it doesn't quite capture all of the examples you have given. Here is another definition of the same, which includes more examples.


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You've stumbled here on a proper English idiom which may (for all I know) be unusual or unique to English, which occurs a lot, and to use which marks one out as fluent. It's a way of predicating a quality or attribute of a thing or person, using the preposition "of". As always, the paradigm is in the Authorized Version of the Bible: "He is ... a man of ...


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Evasive (Source: Cambridge Dicitonary) answering questions in a way that is not direct or clear, especially because you do not want to give an honest answer: done to avoid something bad happening: Dodge to avoid something unpleasant: a clever, dishonest way of avoiding something: Example: Jay is being evasive by dodging the confrontation....


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The Longman’s dictionary you consulted already explains the countable and uncountable sense of occupancy: noun [uncountable] formal [1] the number of people who stay, work, or live in a room or building at the same time single/multiple occupancy single occupancy room rates e.g. Hotels in Tokyo enjoy over 90% occupancy. [uncountable ...


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There is a sense in which it is countable. If I say Fire damage has made occupancy of the building impossible., that is NOT countable. However, if I describe the period during which one person occupies the building as an occupancy, and each subsequent instance an occupancy. Then each of those "occupancies" can be counted.


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Cog traditionally referred to the individual teeth on the cogwheel. Here is the first definition in "cog, n. 2" in the Oxford English Dictionary: One of a series of teeth or similar projections on the circumference of a wheel, or the side of a bar, etc., which, by engaging with corresponding projections on another wheel, etc., transmit or receive motion. ...


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When they have teeth, my experience is that they’re “gears” (definition 6a/2) or “sprockets” (definition 1), though the latter is contextually specific. A “cog” is one of the teeth on a gear, but “cogwheel” is synonymous with “gear”. When it doesn’t have teeth, and carries a belt, it&...


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According to this, it translates to an "oven fork". I did an image search for "ухват" and then for "oven fork" and some of the same images appeared in both as you can see here and here, respectively. For the benefit of the people asking for a photo in the comments, here it is:


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Here is the meaning, and under this is the origin (Bear in mind England was heavily influenced by France therefore so were many of the words) If you take the word literally, it would mean to stand under. English can sometimes be very confusing this way ^ Hope this helps


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Although other texts here are earlier, I thought since it mentions the concept so much and consistently uses the same words for men and women it might be good to look at Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur (published 1485, in this case Volume II from Project Gutenberg). Malory not only applies virgin to men and women, but maiden, clean, and maid as well. For ...


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"You gonna break my chops?" means "Are you going to bother me about that?" or, sometimes, "Because I did something wrong, are you now going to lecture me about why I should not have done something wrong?" "You can take it on the arches." is basically saying that person can just leave the taxi. So the full expression would be more commonly spoken as: "If ...


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Thanks to all for your comments, so "waxing whimsical" means something like "getting more and more extravagant"


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"Interview loop" refers to a process where you take a candidate, have them interviewed by various people and possibly also carry out testing, portfolio evaluation, etc, often over the course of a day or morning/afternoon, but maybe longer (multiple days). It's different from an interview in that it may involve multiple interviews/conversations with different ...


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To bear means to accept and to endure here (definition 3, Lexico) and to forbear means to refrain, to control oneself (Lexico). The proverb comes from a Stoicist motto sustine et abstine, to accept and endure external hardships and to abstain oneself from doing instinctive and emotional things in reaction. In the sentence from the question, it means that "...


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Whether the sentence sounds odd or not depends on the context. If I make the comment out of the blue to my interlocutor, it would probably sound odd. This is because the word other implies shared knowledge as to the first alternative. If on the other hand the comment is preceded by something like: John and I were thinking of asking Sid and Nancy, in which ...


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The Interview Loop An interview is an opportunity for the candidate to expose to you their abilities. You only have an hour, the amount of information gained per minute is worth trying to optimize. Try keeping this model in your head during the interview: Think "What more do I need to know to make a decision?


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It is actually a peculiar sense of restive as explained below: restive (adj.): early 15c., restyffe "not moving forward," from Middle French restif "motionless, brought to a standstill" (Modern French rétif), from rester "to remain" (see rest (n.2)). Sense of "unmanageable" (1680s) evolved via notion of a horse refusing to go forward. (Etymonline)


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Nabokov’s solipsized recalls the Russian word пошлость (poshlost). It now stands for vulgarity - but once was a midway between vulgar and decent. In his book on Gogol, Nabokov notes how Gogol was a virtuous user of poshlost as a middle-of-the-road adjective, specially in “Dead Souls”. And notes: "The Russian language is capable of expressing with a ...


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