New answers tagged

2

The word went from a botanical meaning in the late medieval era, to in the 18th century meaning near the modern sense, introducing disease agents to provide protection, and then in the mid-late 19th century a negative sense, meaning to infect, often through a wound. In the 1760s the negative sense (meaning to infect with the intention of killing not ...


2

The problem with the question is when it uses the definite article: "What is the definition..." Very few words have only one definition. The question doesn't specify the part of speech. Answer 4 is appropriate if study is a noun. And yes, answer 3 is absolutely true if it's a verb. And there are many other possible definitions (e.g. a room ...


0

The problem (as others have pointed out) is that meaning is created via context. There are quite a few questions here that take the pattern "Here's a short sentence. Can it be taken to mean [A] or [B]?" and the answer often is "Well, surrounding context could sway the interpretation to either A or B, but the raw sentence in itself doesn't make ...


-1

So the word "used" is a form of past, "use" is now or future. <Both, not at once> "to" would be the know of past-past "for", the now or of Object used for subjects. "Of" Future contents. Given explanations. I "to" be confused, "for" wrong subjective teaching, "of" ...


0

A word that I find used a lot is: tertial Tertial is a foreign word from Latin meaning a third . In the temporal sense, a third is understood to mean a third of a year , i.e. a period of four months .


0

I have no idea if this is connected, but Stan (from the Eminem song of that name) is common slang for "an overzealous, maniacal fan for any celebrity or athlete". Or, presumably, for a programming language. Per the Urban Dictionary. I've even heard it used as a verb -- "stanning" over something.


-1

It should be noted that "Stan" is a slightly dated pun on Afghanistan, Pakistan, etc. The implication is that the "territory" being denoted is a primitive, backward place. Back in the 60s-70s it was common to use the -stan terminal (something like "Bullwinkle-stan") to identify (especially in cartoons) a fictitious country ...


4

The first blog post, introducing the tool, describes it as a "static analysis tool." I must assume that "STAN" is a portmanteau of "static" and "analysis." A little searching shows it used in other contexts that concern "structure analysis" as well.


0

The commenters have been kind to point out that the term 'ad hominem' is not incorrect in this context. But there are subtypes of ad hominem with their own names that avoid the association with 'man.' The examples in the question seem to me like cases of poisoning the well. And if you happen to be American corporations are people in your country /shrug


-1

It means that "We always become friends with those who look and act like ourselves"


-3

If I'm getting this straight, are you looking for a name to call 2nd & 3rd place finishers? I played sports in the US from 2nd grade through my senior year of High School and we never got a trophy 🏆 for 2nd or 3rd place, honestly, I or any of my team wanted one neither, if you didn't get first place well you didn't work hard enough for it, was how I was ...


1

Even if metal discs weren't actually handed out, I'd have thought people would understand if you said silver and bronze.


1

The dog ate my homework is probably the idiomatic expression more commonly associated with an excuse for not doing your homework: “The dog ate my homework” is used as a stock example of the kind of silly excuses schoolchildren give for why their work isn’t finished. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the first example of the dog ate my homework ...


-1

The proverbs refer to pleasing everyone, impossible to please everyone... as long as you please one person at the same time you dislike another.


0

"Place getter" means achieving first, second or third place, though that is a relatively informal term. Depending on the context, it might be better to use the verb "placed"; something like: Placed in inter-university and all-island competitions If medals are awarded in these competitions, "medalist" would be even better: ...


8

A concise way to put it would be placegetter or placed. In the UK, Australia and New Zealand, "placed" would be understood to be in the top three. My understanding is a place in the US means first or second. Medallist/medalled (UK spelling) or medalist/medaled (US spelling) might work if a medal was awarded. One more possibility is podium finish - ...


0

Searching for the lyrics, I found this line Show your wife how you won medals down in Flanders at lyrics.com song The phrase means simply "toward the south in Flanders". I didn't find "won medals up", although it might appear in another version of the lyrics. Added 11/28 You've added lyrics that contain "...won medals up in Derry......


1

It's flipped around, but it's the phrasal verb "bear on," defined below by Oxford, as shown on Google. bear on phrasal verb of bear 1.be relevant to something. "two kinds of theories bear on literary studies"


0

Why students must use timetables for themself? I think the biggest reason to use a timetable is because of being disciplined. For example when you have to get into society to find a job or look for an opportunity to do something. You must plan to do it. And by developing planning when you are a student > in the progress such as making your own timetable ...


0

A dictionary definition does say what you begin to explain, at least the OALD definition does. (OALD) meaning noun 1 (of sound/word/sign) ​ [uncountable, countable] meaning (of something) the thing or idea that a sound, word, sign, etc. represents Then, if a flower is pink and the meaning of ‘flower’ is the flower, can I say the meaning is pink? No, to ...


0

People always grow up in their streets. That is their neighborhoods. They will commonly describe their neighborhoods as streets. This can also mean the neighborhood of the music scene where they used to be known and respected. Running such a neighborhood or scene is a judgement call from one time to another.


2

Jibe means "to be in agreement with". Jive is a verb to describe a silly (or mendacious) way of talking or less often, a frenetic form of dancing. The usage has its roots in 1930s African-American music. ...and as well there is gibe, which means to taunt or tease. They are sometimes called confusables, or eggcorns. Your protagonist was making a ...


0

Select your choice sounds pleonastic to me, since select simply means to choose, to pick: to choose something, or to make a choice; to choose a small number of things, or to choose by making careful decisions. (Cambridge) However, I was surprised to find so many instances of it on Gngram, so people certainly use it. To my mind it means 'select or tick the ...


1

These are not synonymous at all. specify is an open-ended question requesting detail. Select is asking you to choose from more than one option presented to you.


-1

As per Lexico the meaning of complementary is: Combining in such a way as to enhance or emphasize the qualities of each other or another. Example: they had different but complementary skills In this context, both the stylists will work together and create costumes for Katniss and Peeta that would complement one another.


2

al dente ...would seem to cover that concept, but I have usually heard it in reference to pasta. In my family, al dente means it is "toothy", or semi-resistant to the bite. mouth feel can include texture, etc As the butcher's boy, it sounds like tough v soft. As the physical science teacher, it sounds like a conflation of metrics.


-2

" ought" is old English ( Elizabethian) for Anything of moral correctness or moral error..It is used in the sense of Moral obligation. For example...when Jesus says that if you are in the temple offering your gift( offering) And you remember your brother has ought against you, to leave your offering there and go be reconciled to him. He is saying &...


0

Someone reading a game's rules to learn the game needs to learn exactly what thehy may or may not do, and needs to be confident that they have understood the rules correctly. Possibilities abound, for what a reader might consider plausible. So you as author of the rules need to be clear and unambiguous. What might seem obvious to you or to anyone else ...


0

Can any university once enrolled or registered any student so that it can cancel enrolment or registeration at any stage without awarding or conferring degree to the student as per rule or Law.


0

Your original seems fine by the following definitions from the Oxford English. a. In the first person, expressing the speaker's or writer's immediate intention: I will ‘I am now going to’, ‘I proceed at once to’. 2011 D. Kahneman Thinking, Fast & Slow (2012) xxxv. 377 To distinguish Bentham's interpretation of the term, I will call it experienced ...


-1

"Racial" is an adjective. "Racialised" (or "racialized" if you prefer) is the past participle of a transitive verb — one having a subject, a verb and an object. If you have a "racialised group", this implies that someone has done something to it to differentiate it by race. Seems absurd to me.


0

Biden was about to say "conversation". Then he intended to have "candid" put before the word. So he stopped halfway (conver...), and then continued "candid conversation".


1

The word in the picture is not "conver" it's "conver-" implying he was going to say something like "conversation" but stopped half way through.


0

Yes, it's definitely a common phrase in modern usage. It has the downside of being a widely mocked corporate-speak cliché, but it helps that you're using it in a punning way. If that humor is obvious it would be a benefit. You could also pursue other idioms or phrases. "Circle back" is even more recognized as a cliche, but "bring full circle&...


1

The sentence doesn't say that the distance between any of the two points is 50 miles. The distance between A and B is 50 miles more than the distance between A and C. For example, if the distance between A and C is 100 miles, then the distance between A and B will be 50 miles more, which makes it 150 miles.


0

Why would anyone pluralize a word that is sufficient to complete a thought in the singular? Also, the pluralization of the word HOPE transforms it to indicate that there is more than one when there is truly only one HOPE that is being conveyed. My belief is that to pluralize the word hope is truly poor grammar!


0

There are numerous different ways of changing the system without changing any of the inputs. You can find those ways in chapter 4 section 4.1. It is improper to end a question with words like "by", "at", "with". People do it all the time in spoken language, but in formal writing it's poor form. So, spoken the sentence would be ...


-2

It is a mixed meaning metaphor - one meaning being it is better at the top of Maslow’s pinnacle than at the bottom, the other being it is better to be grandiose.whereas the truth lies somewhere in the middle…….


7

Most likely the Auxiliary Territorial Service, which was the women's branch of the British Army during WWII.


1

According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, in the context of "Christmas Eve", "eve" means: the evening or the day before a special day


0

Complicit. Helping to commit a crime or do wrong in some way. Describes individuals who are “folded together” metaphorically.


0

Howzzabout "equally culpable"? Culpability [Middle English coupable, from Old French, from Latin culpābilis, from culpāre, to blame, from culpa, fault.] The mediator found both parties to be equally culpable.


2

What about in Spanish? Google translate gives three translations of peasant. Seems like the first one is neutral; the other two seem to have negative connotations. el campesino peasant, countryman, country person el palurdo hick, boor, yokel, peasant, rube, bumpkin el paleto hick, bumpkin, peasant, hayseed, gawky And then there is this Cuban slang term: ...


8

It doesn't mean anything. The lyrics are deliberate nonsense, full of contradictions. Consider : It rained all night the day I left, the weather it was dry; The sun so hot I froze to death—Susanna, don’t you cry. The weather is both rainy AND dry. A contradiction. The sun was hot, but the singer froze. Another contradiction. I jumped aboard the ...


0

No no no! The word harumph was commonly spoken by actors forming "crowds" or "gatherings" in old movies to make it sound like there was background conversation happening. When spoken by many people at random, it sounded just like many persons conversing or mumuring. And that, my friends, is the joke.


0

Given that wings are part of the definition of an airplane, why is it correct to use “the airplane” to refer to an airplane without wings? You have not shown that the given assumption is a necessary assumption, or that words rely on rigid definitions. Other answers have tried to show that the mental space is flexible. I am not very well read in semantics (...


1

Missed roughly means yearning for the presence of the object being missed. While this is inherently a non-positive feeling, it doesn’t have to be especially negative. It can include almost as much anticipation of reunion as it does yearning for presence, making it very nearly a positive feeling. This is unlikely to be the case when the object is a recently ...


0

When you are describing things that are personal--learning to play an instrument; write a song--the English term is "aspiration." Those are things you want to do ('aspire to') for your own satisfaction. So they are not really 'projects' or 'activities'. 'Activities' are things you do, rather than things you desire. 'Projects' are often related to ...


1

The use of "sadly" was not intended as limiting, but rather descriptive of ONE way to describe the feeling of 'missing' someone or something. Missing in English, referring to the loss of a person, animal, event, etc. simply means to long for them or it. Sadness typically accompanies this longing when dealing with people, pets, but not always ...


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