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To level your voice would mean to even it out. However, to level your voice at someone like a sword means to weaponize it. Oxford's Lexico has level as aim a weapon: #3: ‘He levelled a pistol at us.’


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It is an idiomatic expression meaning speak in a calm or determined manner: level voice/look/gaze: a steady voice, look etc that shows you are calm or determined. (Longman Dictionary)


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I take "starting to forget" as meaning something like "occasionally unable to remember". Forgetting doesn't happen all at once. Rather, the number of times to try to remember, and can't, goes up with time. At other times, the memory comes back to you.


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There were three: James Spurgeon Scarborough Sr. Sheriff of Lee / Kleberg County James Scarborough II Sheriff, Kleberg Co James Scarborough III Sheriff, Kleberg Co


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Factors,input, data, variables, criteria, results


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How about "aural"? "...of or relating to the ear or to the sense of hearing." (from Merriam-Webster)


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It likely refers to the guys not "having what it takes" either to be a (good) man or to be an honest man.


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The part that you haven’t stated is that in common business usage, “opening hours” refers to the period the business is officially open. The phrase “open hours” isn’t established in business lingo. “Open hours” could be interpreted as those times the business happens to be open - which, as one might expect, would often be the same as the official hours. ...


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Yes, the B is in front of 3 in "B3". B is encountered first, so it is said to be in front of the 3. It's quite normal and natural. You could also say B precedes 3; again, something which precedes is in front. The term is particularly used with currency symbols, where (say) the symbol £ is in front of the number. This certainly fits the Lexico ...


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I'm not surprised you are confused by that last sentence. I suspect that as a direct result of crying (the incident in fifth grade) the author's face was blotchy, and perhaps her nose was red (can happen to anybody) and that's why the boy said she looked like a druggie. To be honest, I don't know what a typical druggie looks like - not within my experience -...


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This sentence is from the book The Crying Book. I guess it is sarcasm to himself


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It has nothing to do with surfing. It is supposed to be a skateboarding reference but it’s not a real one. King either did no research on the actual names of skate tricks or, as someone said above, invented new ones on purpose. He’s a great storyteller, but his weakest writing comes when he tries to write dialogue for kids or subcultures he has no ...


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Transposing dimensions to others is confusing in general as neither the B nor the 3 is in front or behind. One is to the left and one is to the right when talking about position. A clearer way could be to speak of the order of appearance. The B comes first and the 3 follows, which would be understood as we read from left to right.


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As best as I can tell, in this context, humour means 'mood or state of mind' (Lexico). So Prof. von Pettenkofer is using a very convoluted way, with unnecessarily 'big' words, to say that the study of bacteria is 'in', is fashionable, is something many people are obsessed by. The wittiness of the phrase comes from the convoluted phrasing.


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The sentence "This made her think of her Grandpa and her Dad; one of them has passed on and the other is deployed." is unlikely to be correct since you're combining two complete sentences with a semicolon instead of a conjunction. I wouldn't use a semicolon unless I was providing further information abt the previous clause or elaborating the idea ...


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One of the meanings of fungible is 'readily changeable to adapt to new situations : flexible' (Merriam-Webster.) The phrase truth is fungible means that truth is, at least to an extent, not absolute, and can be made to be whatever one wants it to be. Examples of usage: To Wild, truth is fungible, and reality should bend to him. From Approaches to Teaching ...


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I would suggest using the phrase "not secure". For example, this is what is shown in Chrome if a website is determined not to be secure.


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Echoic memory , or auditory sensory memory is a type of memory that stores audio information (sound). ... The purpose of echoic memory is to store audio information as the brain processes the sound. It also holds bits of audio information, which gives meaning to the overall sound. (healthline.com) Collins Dictionary defines echoic memory as: (psychology) ...


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I think these words can convey the sense of "supposed to be an explanation, but not verified yet": hypothesis explanation model framework reasoning rationale justification Or you can simply use "unverified theory" In addition, you can also use these words, but for me they emphasize the connotation of a subjective interpretation rather ...


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American Dictionary of the English Language, Noah Webster 1828 is very good dictionary compare to modern dictionaries. Its definition for candid is: [L. candidus, white, from canden, to be white; W. canu, to bleach. See Cant.] White. Dryden [But in this sense rarely used.] Fair; open; frank; ingenuous; free from undue bias; disposed to think and judge ...


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The sentence is concise and full of ellipsis and contextual implication. It may be interpreted as: “... the most female being first sought ...” as “... the most female {of the bulls} being {the} first {to be} sought {by the most male bull, or most male group of bulls}. Note the initial use of the definite article the to refer to the most female, by ...


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It seems to me that "is being" is actually incorrect here. If my tomorrow is your yesterday is in Simple Present, whereas it is also possible to put the sentence in a subjunctive mood, ie. If my tomorrow were your yesterday or even If my tomorrow be your yesterday, which sounds more poetic and old-ish. That said, I doubt that If my tomorrow is ...


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Yes, you can add which or that after "lawmakers" (I would personally add whom in this context). The relative pronoun whom (or which or that) is not missing, it has just been elided. Other companies are focusing on lawmakers (whom/which/that) they view as complicit in Trump's effort to disrupt the affirmation of Biden's election win. So the ...


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If the police merely believe the neighbour did it, that is not proof that the neighbour did it. The neighbour is therefore not guilty, but is only a suspect. Suspect = noun. one that is suspected. especially : a person suspected of a crime Merriam Webster “She stole the money” is a statement of fact. We have to take that statement as the only context for ...


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@Kate Bunting from the comments already did a good job clarifying your confusions, so I will just provide extra validation. From your first sentence, I see that before the blank there is a determiner, the "a/an"; only "suspect" would fit here, and uses determiner "a"; "suspect" is a noun, and that is what the blank ...


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Currently, I am on my personal time-off. Please reach out to john ________ Disconnected from work for my vacation. Please reach out to john _____ These options could help. Feel free to let me know how you feel.


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Well in many cases purvey has more a connotation of selling, or seeking to desseminate. But it's use in this sentence makes me wonder if it isn't being used in its historical obsolete sense of "foreseeing" or "preparing for" (see reference. I wonder if broader context world be helpful, because I don't understand what this sentence is ...


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Sorry, you're all out to lunch. The idols are graven (carved) not craven. Misheard, misspelled, misused....please do not ever write craven idols. The rock band's name was clearly a joke, which apparently nobody gets.. I feel sorry for the word craven, now used to mean corrupt although for centuries it had a plain meaning: cowardly, weak and slavish. And now ...


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Too much analysis; too literal! "Dry" snow, like a dry wine, is, as suggested, a relative term. Climatologists and weather people take great care to measure the water equivalent of snow. Today I measured the driest snow I have ever seen, at 3% water. That number can vary from there up to 35% or more.


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To answer your first question, you can -- as the commenters have pointed out -- but it's not common usage and you will get various complaints and/or weird looks. To answer your second question, there is no way to know in advance. You have to check the dictionary. I don't have any sources for this because it's a fundamental feature or bug of the English ...


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My interpretation of the ellipsis is: ... she did not want to marry him, but was willing to live with him without doing so.


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Well, I've found the original text in Russian. The original text says, "she didn't want to marry him, however she didn't mind living this way", ie. without changes. Hope it helped.


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Dictionary.com https://www.dictionary.com/browse/ridiculous defines ridiculous as causing or worthy of ridicule or derision; absurd; preposterous; laughable The original meaning is "causing or worthy of ridicule", but the word is now often used to mean "absurd" without a strong negative connotation. This allows for the slang meaning, ...


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I am a non-native English speaker, and you are not alone in getting confused. However, we have two clues to help us get less confused: Look at the content You should look at the expression in the content it is said. If it is used in negative/ positive content, it also probably means something negative/ positive. E.g., That is ridiculous! He has no ...


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Or is not the "or" of Modern English, but Or = ere = before. OED: ere, adv.1, prep., conj., and adj. B. prep. 1. a. Before (in time). Forms: β. Middle English–1600s (1800s archaic) or, Middle English ore. d. with the addition of ever. β. 1608 W. Shakespeare King Lear vii. 445 This heart shall breake, in a 100. thousand flowes Or ere ile weepe. ...


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Use of the definite article “the” indicates one masterpiece rather than one of many that might be indicated by the indefinite article “a”. In this case “... the masterpiece” refers the reader to one masterpiece, but to which? There are many masterpieces in the world. Even if we understand from context that the reference is restricted to the works of ...


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'Auto-coup', (or self-coup) is understood by journalists and scholars who have studied political events in ‘third-world’ countries "Make no mistake: Trump is trying to pull off a Latin American-style ‘self-coup’" -by Andres Oppenheimer Miami Herald NB: Posted 1 hour after the events of 1/6/2021 in D.C. (not so coincidentally with the re-...


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It means that not a line can be dispensed with, removed, cleared, forgotten in such a way as for this loss to go unnoticed.


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Here is AHD on glib Given to or characterized by fluency of speech or writing that often suggests insincerity, superficiality, or a lack of concern. And a tad, as defined by the same dictionary, means To a small degree; somewhat Thus Pr. Skinner is saying that he doesn't completely stand by what he'd said previously: suspension, expulsion, deportation, ...


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{As a recent questioner, welcome to the site; please read the site tour and please include your own research when you ask questions}. What did you find when you looked in the dictionary for "tad" and "glib"? You probably saw something like this: tad (noun) mainly UK informal a tad: a little, slightly "The fish was OK, but the chips ...


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It is so unfortunate that “remember me to ___” is going out of fashion. It is such a good way of saying Let ——- know that I say hello. In fact, it means more than just "hello", it’s fonder with a hint of respect. It sounds very formal but many times I’ve heard this colloquially used in Nottinghamshire growing up. Very pleasant to the ear.


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Etymology itself has a rather unfortunate etymology. The -ology part is just Greek for 'words about', typical of all abstract fields of knowledge. But the etymon part is Greek for 'true name'; that is, the name that naturally refers to something, and therefore compels it. The doctrine of True Names is part of magic, and is just as effective as any magic. ...


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"Bites" here means "is very bad". Merriam-Webster dictionary gives one of the meanings of "bite" as 8 chiefly US slang, sometimes vulgar : to be objectionable or extremely bad in quality : STINK, SUCK The example they give is: This song bites.


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In the given context, otherwise than means that the person has only seen the library open before, and is now seeing it closed. Try replacing with 'other than'. They mean the same thing and are both grammatically correct, though 'otherwise than' embellishes the sentence a little more. A few helpful links: Glosbe definition, Macmillan Dictionary definition


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otherwise = in the other way or differently than = compared to something otherwise than = differently or in the other way compared to something You never saw the library differently or in the other way compared to "wide open". "differently/in the other way" modifies "saw" differently from "wide open" means in the way ...


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I tell you why most Chinese say "sports meeting", because it is used in a widely-used English textbook for primary school students.


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It is defined as an "occupation, profession, or trade" at Dictionary.com. So that means you can use it for both: the head of a company, or a low-class waiter (both having an occupation in the business). And hence, you can say the same for people who are financial analysts or accountants of a company that specializes in frozen food.


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The red rose has long been associated with love. To take two examples: From Western culture, it has been believed that this type of flower was created by the goddess of love, Aphrodite. According to the legend, her tears and the blood of her lover, Adonis, watered the ground, from where the red roses grew. It was then a symbol of love until death. For the ...


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One cannot feed on roses. Not even as a snack. From the purely practical point of view, roses are useless. What the author means is long-lasting relationships require down-to-earth, prosaic food. Or some such platitude.


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