New answers tagged

1 vote

Cursed VS accursed

It is true that dictionary definitions don't always clarify such differences. Take for example Collins: If a person is accursed, they have been cursed. [literary] However, ambiguous as it may seem, ...
fev's user avatar
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2 votes

What is a 'Swivel Servant'?

"swivel servant" - play on the expression "civil servant" A person who pretends to work while lounging in his or hers taxpayer-provided swivel chair !! Possible origin - CBC Radio -...
Don Curtin's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

What "On your approach" means in this context?

The game is using aviation terminology. An "approach" is the phase of the flight where you are "approaching" something - usually an airport if you are a normal plane, a target if ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
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0 votes

Logicalness/logicity/logicality

"(T)he degree to which something pertains to logic". This is most of the problem. Logic isn't gradable - something is logical or it isn't, there are no degrees of logicalness. Something ...
Phil Sweet's user avatar
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0 votes

How do you understand "I have to change my file names"?

An English speaker would interpret that as they need to update the name of a file or list of files to a specific format.
John Lindsay's user avatar
1 vote

Why were US businessmen in the late 19th cent. known >in print< by first & middle initial + last name, such as R.N. Smith?

This article by Ian Scott for the National Library of Scotland is relevant (I've bolded major reasons put forward): Initial success : J. R. Hartley and other authors who use initials                 ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
-1 votes

Can the adjective "squalid" be used to describe a person?

I've really only seen or heard the term "squalid" to describe the condition of a place, especially residential buildings. There's no reason why the term couldn't be used to describe people ...
Aristocratic Jack's user avatar
0 votes

Using "actually" to talk about the present

Actually simply refers to what is true, often in response to an erroneous statement by someone else or to counter a doubt when the statement seems like the listener might think the statement is ...
TimR's user avatar
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-1 votes

Does saying that you love your parents more imply you love each of them the same way?

I think the sentence 'I love my parents more' is to compare your love of your parents (taken as a whole, not separately) with your love of someone or something else. The sentence cannot be taken to ...
EvanNguyen's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

What does 'scope' mean here?

In this context, scope means vision or range: Cambridge Dictionary - Scope: The range of a subject covered by a book, programme, discussion, class, etc.: I'm afraid that problem is beyond/outside the ...
Vector's user avatar
  • 932
2 votes

Should I use "prosthetics" or "prostheses" for a plural noun?

When discussing multiple prosthetic devices, it's essential to use the term "prostheses" as the plural form. This term adheres to the typical rules for forming plurals in English, where the ...
Language Insights's user avatar
1 vote

Info on the word "compossess"?

The OED offers: † compossessor noun Obsolete. rare. A joint possessor. 1611 1611   Compossesseur, a compossessor; a ioynt possessor; one that..hath part in a thing with another. —R. Cotgrave, ...
Tinfoil Hat's user avatar
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1 vote

Origin of "moke," used in the mildly derogatory term "you lil' moke"

OED: Moke Summary: Of unknown origin. Compare English regional (Hampshire, Devon) mokus donkey. Notes: In the 16th cent. proverbial phrase ‘Mocke (or Mok) hath lost her shoe’ (Skelton Why come ye nat ...
Greybeard's user avatar
  • 42k
2 votes

Is the word "bridge" used to indicate measurement of something in this sentence?

It's this definition (from Oxford Languages): make (a difference between two groups) smaller or less significant. "new initiatives were needed to bridge the great abyss of class". The ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 25.5k
1 vote

"Contents are undefined" vs "Content is undefined"

Here's the relevant usage chart showing relative prevalence for plural the buffer contents are and singular the buffer content is... Take your pick. I defy anyone to claim some subtle difference in ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
1 vote

Meaning of " you came when you did"

This is usually used in the context of I am glad you came when you did. It needs something in front of it. It makes little sense outside of that. It means what it appears to mean; I am glad that you ...
Elliot's user avatar
  • 5,371
1 vote

Etymology and meaning of the word "but" in the sentence

But means just in Dickens’s sentence: As much mud in the streets as if the waters had just newly retired from the face of the earth . . . The OED lists this sense as obsolete (obsolete now but still ...
Tinfoil Hat's user avatar
  • 17.1k
5 votes

What's the meaning difference between in person and in-person?

That explanation is bad and confusing. The difference is simply the same as this: She works part time. She is a part-time worker. In 2, part-time is an adjective and so requires a hyphen. There's no ...
user182601's user avatar
5 votes

What's the meaning difference between in person and in-person?

You ask: Is it feasible to interpret 'in person' as 'in flesh' and 'in-person' as 'offline'? No, the distinction is in their 'part of speech', not so much in their underlying meanings. In person is ...
Lawrence's user avatar
  • 38.7k
0 votes

I often say to people ''you're feeling all made up'' when they are really happy about the outcome of a situation, where does this saying come from?

It's a common Liverpool expression. 'My mate's just become a grandmother, she's made-up'. It simply means very happy, or 'over the moon'. My guess is that it comes from putting on make-up, and getting ...
Michael Wingfield's user avatar
0 votes

Meaning of "four into a ten stretch"?

One meaning of stretch according to Green's Dictionary of Slang: in prison/Und. uses [abbr. SE stretch of time]. a twelve-month sentence; thus two stretch, two years; three stretch, three years etc ...
Laurel's user avatar
  • 66.4k
0 votes

Meaning of "four into a ten stretch"?

Four years served out of a ten year prison sentence.
Alex's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes

What did Terry Pratchett mean by "avec"?

I always thought of it as a take on the fashionable, but slightly pretentious culinary term, 'umami'. Can't remember the book's title, but Sir Terry wrote about hard times in Ankh Morpork when a chef ...
Jeremy Ritchie's user avatar
3 votes

Working vs walking on both sides of the street

No, neither of the phrases is necessarily sexual. For example a 04 April 1906 conversation in the US House Committee on Coinage, Weights and Measures was: Mr. Wood: The English system is taught in ...
DavePhD's user avatar
  • 10.6k
0 votes

Is this sentence considered a double negative?

What the sentence is actually saying "There is no way that it doesn't work on your phone." There is an implied "that". The sentence does not have a double negative.
Rohit Gupta's user avatar
7 votes

What does the word "leggit" mean?

That's just a bad spelling transcription of the verb to leg it, which Wiktionary tells us is "slang" that means to run away or flee, or to hurry. The OED dates it back to the 1500s, however, ...
tchrist's user avatar
  • 135k
0 votes

Is “since long” correct English, and if so what does it mean?

In present day context, I firmly believe that 'long since' and 'Since long' both are logically ok but must be used in different relations; eg: Long since means- long time has passed since a point of ...
Aaryan Kota's user avatar
0 votes

Usage of the word "technically"

'Technically speaking' denotes that the factual truth of a situation, is somewhat different from 'the actual truth', or from what is practically achievable in reality. The technical detail doesn't ...
Jelila's user avatar
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0 votes

Denotation of Paradox

Merriam-Webster brings out the obvious contradiction manifest by two of the varied senses of paradox: paradox ... 2a: a statement that is seemingly contradictory or opposed to common sense and yet ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
1 vote

When did "light (something) up" begin to mean shooting?

J.E. Lighter, The Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1997) has the following relevant entries for "light up": light up v. ... 2.a. to fire a gun. 1953–55 Fine Delinquents ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
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0 votes

When did "light (something) up" begin to mean shooting?

Light them up doesn't strictly mean shooting. In prison and street lingo it just means to promptly attack someone without suffering any substantial resistance on immediately upon encountering them. ...
PreCorpse's user avatar
-2 votes

What might the term "B-I-T-sweetie" mean in the context of Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes's play "The Mule-Bone"?

Yes,... If it's a letter from a prospective 'suiter' the capitalized letters with a period in between would say it's an anchcroymn and I'd think it to be 'Boyfriend in Training' as well.
Katie Krehnbrink's user avatar
1 vote

When did "light (something) up" begin to mean shooting?

The first citation in print with the meaning "to shoot, destroy with gunfire" is from 1967, in Puerto Rican writer Piri Thomas's Down These Mean Streets: You’d smack him down like Whiplash ...
Stuart F's user avatar
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0 votes

Difference between "creed" and "credo"

My understanding: The word "credo" literally means "I believe" in Latin. Accordingly,"credo" in English ordinarily is used to denote an individual's personal belief or ...
P Clark's user avatar
  • 11

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