New answers tagged

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I think here, maybe gamecock means tough opponent/rival or somebody that is a fierce fighter in a game, relationship and so on.


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an obsolete meaning of ditty bop is a military person who listened to and interpreted Morse code, an artificial language of dashes and dots = dittys and bops


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Dis-CURS-us. Cursion as in Recursion, or of a course. Of course is a countable, as in a iteration of a process. Off course in the course would qualify as discourse, which indicates paradox. Unsurprisingly, we then find discursus defined as a paradoxiformation. In course merely indicates a passage, or process, from which any prefix or suffix can be ...


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From CoGEL p. 934 § 13.31, And in relation to or Because and and or contrast with one another in meaning, or following a negative is in some respects equivalent to and. Thus: He doesn't have long hair or wear jeans. [1] is logically equivalent to the combination of two negative statements 'He doesn't have long hair AND He doesn't wear jeans'. [1b] This ...


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I think the sentence is ambiguous. If the person is going to make a phone call TO your phone, then I would leave out the word "on." If the person is going to use your phone to make a phone call, then I would rephrase without repeating the word phone. I.E., I'm waiting for no one but you to use my phone. In my opinion, your question pertains not to ...


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The context of the quote, found here at Google Books is that inmates who are not eligible for certain programmes may enrol on them in order to access benefits offered for enrolment, if the benefits are a tradeable commodity. In this instance being discussed the programme is a Suicide Prevention Programme and the incentive for enrolment is two Mars Bars. As ...


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Piping hot means extremely hot, and refers to temperature. The sentence is not redundant; it means that hot (temperature) food had to be served very hot, not just somewhat hot.


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If "id" is your subject as I think it is... AND "of node" is a prepositional (adjective) phrase answering the would-be question: Q. Which id is it? The "node" Id. Then the rest of the sentence can be written this way because it is "further" describing the Id of node using another adjective phrase: "The id of node, ...


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Wikipedia defines risk homeostasis in terms of risk and reward, much as financial pioneers Fama and French defined asset classes in terms of risk and reward. Gerald J. S. Wilde proposed that people maximise their benefit by comparing the expected costs and benefits of safer and riskier behaviour and which introduced the idea of the target level of risk (...


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The industry's exposure must be its exposure to international laws, as with the firm's exposure. The word "exposure" here means susceptibility. (I've used 'subject to' below.) Using your substitutions: First, we assume firm A's whole industry ('manufacturing') is subject to international laws, then define the treatment based on whether (or to what ...


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By Natural they mean unrefined and in the case of Raw defiance likely impolite; including rough edges. Raw talent would be natural, inborn talent; not learned from teachers or coaches. Raw can also be used pejoratively to indicate low quality of talent or skill; rough, amateurish. New soldiers, just out of basic training are referred to as raw or green, as ...


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As a quick aside: "to change", with or without a person as an object, can mean "to take off clothing and put on new clothes". You can change a baby (remove and replace its nappy). When you come home from work, you might change (take off your work clothes and put on casual clothes). But in this case that's not what's being referred to. &...


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Royal = belonging or connected to a king or queen or a member of their family: Cambridge Another usage is illustrated by Royal = good or excellent, as if intended for or typical of royalty: “The team was given a royal reception/welcome.” Cambridge The company is suggesting that it has Royal customers, in the sense that they are members of a royal family. ...


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but if it is a noun, "evil ways with his back to the wall" looks very weird. It looks weird, but it isn't. Way / Ways (noun) OED: III. A course of action or behaviour; a means, a manner, a method. 16.a. A path or course of life; a person's activities and fortunes in life, esp. when considered from an ethical or spiritual point of view. b. In ...


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If you mean that you had previously invested in or bought into the feminine beauty ideal and now wish to divest, you may use "from" to express that nuance (see def. 1 - fourth example), literal or figurative not having any bearing on usage as all things literal may be used figuratively, there being nothing literal that is barred from figurative use....


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The more common preposition is OF also in a figurative usage: (see sense 2 from OLD) Divest: divest yourself of something to get rid of something The company is divesting itself of some of its assets. divest somebody/something of something to take something away from someone or something After her illness she was divested of much of her responsibility. ...


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"Intimated" - indicated or made known indirectly; hinted at; implied. The meaning of "intimated" is the opposite of "shared expressly," what another here said it means. Now, it is true that the meaning "shared expressly" may be inferred from the citation, but only from the entire phrase "more than intimated,"...


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The word you are looking for is "aphorism" derived from the Greek word meaning "definition". The modern cultural artifact we call a "dictionary" is based on one interpretation of how to define a word's meaning. The current approach is based primarily on a philosophy of use - that a word means whatever its users use it to mean. ...


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From what I surmise, you're basing your question on basically the following assumptions: Unless we're emphasizing a modifier to especially differentiate the noun it modifies from another that would be differently described (e.g., I drive the 'red car, not the 'blue car.)* in order to clarify and aovid confusion, we generally put emphasis, or more emphasis, ...


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Actually crack in the sense of an excellent person or thing is used as a noun: (a) in fig. uses. (a) any person, animal or thing that approaches perfection. 1936 [Aus] ‘Banjo’ Paterson Shearer’s Colt 63: He was a real crack, but he turned unmanageable at the barrier so they refused his nominations. (Green’s Dictionary of Slang)


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"Children rarely get to spend quality time with their parents as both are bogged down with their own demanding schedules" In this sentence here, I would say "bogged down" means something like "both are too busy" or "both have too much to do". The fact that the author specifies its meaning as "having to do several ...


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It can be a bit confusing since it may seem like "crack" is being used as a noun. It's not. It's being used as an adjective. The author has left the noun that it describes unsaid, along with leaving the subject and verb unsaid, as well. Referring back to the prior sentence to glean what they all are, one may infer that the unsaid noun that "...


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As a conjunction or preposition use after. In this sense, it means ‘later than’ and ‘next in time or place’. The problem comes when you need to use them as an adverb. After is not usually used alone. It is usually part of an adverbial phrase. "Shall we have a swim after lunch?" "The bank is just after the park, on the left." These two ...


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An additional example - this time of dido by itself - the 'cutting' apparently is to be assumed. This comes from Pulp fiction of the 1930s, by Lester Dent (under the house name Kenneth Robeson). Repel (Deadly Swarf in the later Bantam reprint, where this is on p. 49) was the Doc Savage story published by Street & Smith in Oct 1937. It is about a volcano ...


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The background assumption here is that this is the kind of journey that is undertaken solely for the purpose of getting to the destination, without expecting any interesting, exciting experiences along the way. Think of, for example, a train journey that one spends reading a book, because there is nothing interesting to see through the windows. When such ...


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There's no slang meaning. "Sad beauty" means exactly what it says: beauty that's sad. Beauty is often short-lived. When it is, bearing witness to it, like bearing witness to someone's beauty and mortality simultaneously, is often sad for the witness, so seeing a picture of the now-late Princess Diana holding a terminally ill child with AIDS would ...


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In the context of your quote, "certain" carries the sense of an indeterminate amount. certain adjective 2 attributive Specific but not explicitly named or stated. 2.1 Used when mentioning the name of someone not known to the reader or hearer. ‘a certain General Percy captured the town’ -Lexico If we go strictly by the definitions above, your ...


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"I trust [that] the journey was uneventful" OED: Trust (v.) 5.a. transitive. To have confidence that something desired is, or will be, the case. With clause (esp. that-clause) as object […] to hope, expect. 1937 R. Stout Red Box ix. 136 ‘I trust that we are still brothers-in-arms?—’ ‘Absolutely. Pals.’ 2000 R. W. Holder Taunton Cider & ...


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The phrase is stating that the speaker hopes that the person had a journey that involved no problems. The hope is that no negative events occurred, rendering the journey uneventful. In this sense the meaning of uneventful is maintained, albeit only so far as it applies to negative occurrences.


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Several reference works have attempted to draw distinctions between need and necessity since Fleisher did so in 1804. From George Crabb, English Synonymes Explained, in Alphabetical Order (1816): Necessity respects the thing wanted; need the person wanting. There would be no necessity for punishments, if there were not evil doers ; he is peculiarly ...


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I've concluded the "scales" referred to are fish scales. Ancient (And modern) Jews needed to identify which fish had scales to conform with dietary restrictions. I have no direct association with fish scale, but believe them to be small semi-transparent bits of tissue found on a fish's skin (or maybe it is the skin). Check this website for ...


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As you suggested, I also think he means to say that "in the day" (in one day/across the duration of the day), about 8000 horses died. At least contextually, this makes the most sense to me. They had 800000 horses and about 1% died each day.


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I believe "in the day" in this case is the short version of "back in the day"... Being a nostalgic approach to their past. "In a day" would be measuring the capacity of something. For example, "I can work three jobs in one day" or "We are running out of rice. There are some kids eating five bowls in one day (or in ...


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No. Take care implies behavior that improves ones wellbeing over an extended period. Look out and watch out are synonymous, and urge taking immediate action to avoid an accident.


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Will, generally, is the faculty of the mind that selects, at the moment of decision, a desire among the various desires present; it itself does not refer to any particular desire, but rather to the mechanism responsible for choosing from among one's desires. From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Will_(philosophy)


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No differences can be seen between look out and watch out, yet take care is quite different. Watch out is the best, I believe. There are also many other choices like Cautious. Still I assume watch out is the best.


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It's all obedience. Compliance with an order, request, or law or submission to another's authority. (Lexico) This is also seen in the Bystander Effect, where people do nothing in hopes that someone else will step in and save the day. Unfortunately this results in inaction to respond in a serious situation. The Milgram experiments of 1962 sought to ...


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A word to describe this attitude is deference Submission or courteous respect given to another, often in recognition of authority. The psychological phenomenon itself is authority bias The human tendency to attribute greater authority and knowledge to persons of authority (fame, power, position, etc.) than they may actually possess. The bias to believe ...


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You could characterize this behaviour by saying of the people who are given to it that they are submissive. (OALD) too willing to accept somebody else’s authority and willing to obey them without questioning anything they want you to do ♦ He expected his daughters to be meek and submissive. ♦ She followed him like a submissive child. OPPOSITE assertive


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If one wants to be really, really pedantic, one can argue that the sentence Japan had a lower consumption of all butter, compared with Russia. is ambiguous. It can be taken to mean (1) Japan had a lower consumption of all butter in aggregate, compared with Russia (i.e. the total quantity of all kinds of butter, taken together, that was consumed in Japan ...


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People sometimes may use "consider as" to mean "consider to be," but if that is the actual intended meaning, it's a mistake because the words themselves don't mean "consider to be" but actually mean the exact opposite. "Consider as" actually means "consider like." When something is "like" something ...


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Simply, these two authorities disagree on this particular point. This problem is a recurring one in the study of all languages and it stems from the fact that given the great complexity and unsettled nature of such a system as a language, not all humans speaking a given language as their mother tongue can perceive it in the same way, and this is true in ...


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According to Wikipedia, a "company" is an association of people (natural or otherwise), which implies ownership by more than one person or entity. The term "firm" has its root in the latin firmare, roughly translated as "name" or "signature"; which means the name under which a businessman or merchant is doing business. ...


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I had a quick look at the episode in question to get some context. You'll see in the show that there is a small tree (a bonsai) at the front of the room and a boy is taking care of it. That is, he is tending to the tree. Apparently, this is a formal assignment and the child who is assigned to tend to the tree is called the "tender of the tree." ...


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One interpretation I could think of is this: Take into account the "You were a cute kid.". It implies they no longer are cute, something changed. Perhaps the "tender of the tree" is referring to something "special" or "precious" of said tree that is lost or changes over time. That would imply the person being talked ...


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“You ain't shit” "You are nothing compared to me" "You are worthless" "You amount to nothing" “You're shit” "You're bad/terrible/awful (at this)" "You are (literally) a turd" The main difference here is that "You ain't shit" usually implicates the victim of this verbal abuse with some form of ...


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This is what I assume, I'm not sure though: Straight over the top. Directly on top of the people they are trying to hit. Bombs gone. The bombs have been dropped. Have we got ‘em Mike? (Mike is a pilot in a helicopter.) Did we get them, Mike?


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No. It means that the Homeric epic poems (and the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles and others) also had aspects of Greek religion, and these were another way for the Greeks to learn about it.


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I would say that it would be interpreted that 'Greek religion, which is being presented in the Homeric epic poems, embodies many tensions in it' based on the first sentence. It said Greeks absorbed religion... through the Homeric epic poems, saying that Greek religion is presented in the Homeric Epic and cultic worship. So I would say yes to the first ...


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