The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.

New answers tagged

0

2 is correct. The democracy is that of multiple workers, so workers is plural. Because of that, the apostrophe applies to the plural form and is therefore after the s. If the democracy was the "property" of a single worker, then it would be that worker's democracy.


0

It's a spelling error. As you said, you meant "principle". You just spelled it "principal". If you'd spelled it "principel", there wouldn't be any question about the type of error. The fact that your misspelling happens to be another word doesn't change the nature of the error. Consider these two examples: "I like the read convertible." - Did I ...


0

Spelling error; both are different words Principle is a noun; principal is an adj., except in cases like School Principal.


3

From Etymology.com cobweb (n.) "a spider's web," early 14c., coppewebbe; the first element is Old English -coppe, in atorcoppe "spider," literally "poison-head" (see attercop). Cob as a stand-alone for "a spider" was an old word nearly dead even in dialects when J.R.R. Tolkien used it in "The Hobbit" (1937). Figurative use for "something ...


0

It is said that there is a small difference between a) I saw her go home... and b) I saw her going home..., in that the former reflects 'go' as a regular action, and in the latter 'going' was progressing exactly (ie only) at that time. This is not a universally accepted argument. Still, grammarians in general say that both are not much dissimilar. I ...


0

The sentence in question looks a little tricky. To help you see its meaning easily, I'm going to try a couple of sentence changes. Free-time activities are an important part. This sentence can be changed into a question below. How important a part are free-time activities? This question is asking your judgment on the importance of the activities. So, ...


0

The sentence could be rephrased as follows: How important is it for you to have a part of your week for your free-time activities? or ...to have time for your free-time activities? I'm not a native speaker of English, too, so I may be wrong :) I have found an answer to the question on the internet: Examiner: How important a part of your week ...


0

In your example sentence, Jags, the simple answer would be to use the past tense at the end, and simple present at the beginning. In general, financial statements follow this format: Entity Type of Statement Period or date E.g, National General, Inc. Income Statement For the Year Ended December 31, 1877 Mega Micro Association, PLC Balance Sheet December ...


3

Both are grammatical: keep functions as both a copulative and transitive verb, so can be used both with adjectives (keep silent, keep still) and nouns (keep silence, keep possession). However, "keep silent" is far more idiomatic for telling people to be quiet, though "keep silence" might be used in a more formal context to emphasise the collective nature ...


2

"Everyday" is an adjective used like "ordinary" or "usual"; it modifies a noun. "Every day" is an adverb used like "ordinarily" or "usually"; it modifies a verb or adjective. As a simple test, try replacing "everyday" with "ordinary", and "every day" with "ordinarily", and see if it means what you meant to say. Which one is obviously wrong?: «I miss you. ...


-1

In any event it should be 'my watching tv'. Watching is indeed a gerund. Gerunds take the possessive...


0

In my opinion the following looks more easy and professional Log In Using Your Mobile Or log in using other methods Continue as a guest Giving more easiness to the users in UI or systems to understand it, is the basic necessity.


2

This dilemma is relatively common among people, it can be slightly confusing at times. Every day means each day whereas everyday is an adjective used to describe something that has been/has been seen used every day. Everyday: These are great clothes for everyday use. Every day: I exercise every day in order to remain fit and healthy.


2

No, "Everyone agrees on how it does work" is not acceptable unless "does" has strong contrastive stress. And, if "does" has contrastive stress, there must be something in the context that explains the contrast. Perhaps someone has indicated that it doesn't work, so that there is the contrast between "doesn't work" and "DOES work".


-2

“She hadn't been used [past tense] to being treated like that [in the past]” “She hadn't been used [past tense] to be treated like that [in the future.]”? For example: "And she would not expect to be treaded like that in the future!


2

Short answer There are two main different types of to in English. One of these is the to we find in to-infinitive constructions (e.g. To err is human), the other is the directional preposition (e.g. I drove to the farm). The English verb use(d) takes a to-infinitive as a Complement. The English adjective used takes a to preposition phrase as a Complement. ...


1

...used to being treated is like, used to + passive voice of 'treating'. In 2nd sentence,...used to be treated..., followed the passive form of 'to treat'. It is more correct to say, One is used to being blamed... than 'one is used to be blamed...The relevance goes to 'ing' form in passive voice.


0

The sentence is derived as follows: Istambul is a good city. (Declarative or statement form) Is Istambul a good city? (Yes/No interrogative) Yes, Istambul is a good city. (Positive reply/answer) No, Istambul is not a good city. (Negative answer) Isn't Istambul a good city? (Negative interrogative) When a question tag is added to it, it goes like "Istambul ...


3

Per Wikipedia on Vietnamese Names there is a convention for this. Vietnamese personal names generally consist of three parts: one patrilineal family name, one or more middle name(s) (one of which may be taken from the mother's family name), and one given name, used in that order. The "family name first" order follows the system of Chinese names and is ...


1

Yes, the phrase "future of" requires a noun to complete the prepositional phrase. The phrase "future of compute" is ungrammatical.


1

"Initially" is an adverb meaning "at the beginning" or "at first." The word "least" adds the idea that the circumstance (surprise, non-agreemnent, "gold") while not permanent, was true for some time in the beginning, and possibly for longer. "Least" is a word that hedges accuracy. "She is at least 30" means the speaker is not sure of her age, but is giving ...


0

Lexeme is the term coined by Crystal to cover this, though it is not specific to inflections of nouns. A lexeme is a unit of lexical meaning that underlies a set of words that are related through inflection. It is a basic abstract unit of meaning,[1] a unit of morphological analysis in linguistics that roughly corresponds to a set of forms taken by ...


1

The first sentence is correct. "Present" is used in adjective here and it means "being or existing in a specified place" so "present" can not be used as verbs like the third and fourth sentences. There is no need to use the preposition "at" in the second sentences, just write everywhere is enough.


1

Yes, both usages are correct, but mean different things. "All" means the whole of something. In the first case it is the whole of (the group of) apples in the basket. In the second it means the whole of the single apple, or of an uncountable mass of substance labelled 'apple' - which might be a lot of mushed up apple or a lot of apple- flavoured something....


0

Well, how about this? Give the baton to he whom you trust. It sounds worse to me than your example, so I'm guessing that you are right, and that "he" in your example is due to agreement in case with the "who" of the relative clause.


2

In your example, swapping "had" for "could have" would change the meaning of the sentence. "There is a possibility that person had hit my car". Means: your car was hit (by someone), and it is possible that it was "that person". "There is a possibility that person could have hit my car". Means: your car was not hit, but if the conditions were different, ...


5

In general, hyphens are used to construct compound adjectives: I had to catch an early-morning train. I like late-night television. She wears extra-large socks. Hyphens are not used when the words stand alone. So, to use your examples: It was a once-in-a-lifetime trip (a trip so special or expensive that one would be unlikely to undertake such a trip more ...


-1

If you use "could have" instead of "had", then this is repetitive. "Could" means something that you believe is likely to be true or to happen, the sentence has already have "there is a possibility" in the beginning and there is no need to use "could".


0

" Our destiny is to be doomed", is suggesting that, no matter what they [we] do, we will always be doomed [to failure / to repeat past mistakes]. Destiny: The events that will necessarily happen to a particular person or thing in the future, or The hidden power believed to control future events; fate. Doomed: likely to have an unfortunate and ...


0

Proper sentence: Family reunion had already been popular when they celebrated their 50th anniversary. "50" must be "50th" It does not matter if it is in another way round, "When they celebrated their 50th anniversary, family reunion had already been popular." is okay. You should give the information(a family reunion or a wedding party) about what "it" is. ...


1

To me, some implies that you expect to sell several pencils at a time, as you said, possibly because they are packaged as a set. 'Do you want to buy any?' sounds like a more tentative offer. 'I have pencils here if you happen to need one.'


2

I have checked the compound preposition(double preposition) list in the Internet and I can't find "with of" is in the list. There is 'with use of something', 'with help of something', etc. I think with of isn't grammatically correct anyway.


-1

Do you want to buy SOME pencils mean that you are expecting the people you ask will say yes. Do you want to buy ANY pencils mean you do not expect the people you ask will say yes or no


-1

Better to avoid the gerund altogether and use Active voice: "To produce extremely concise code, use extension methods joined together in chains." "Use this tool to..." The [using the] gerund can easily result in overly verbose language.


4

Aza on Literature, worth reading, predates other events; later wrote an update that's even more worth reading. Aza on Literature, worth reading, predates other events; later wrote an update that's worth reading even more. The original, (1) was fine as it was, even if some people might find it clunky. The edited version, (2) is positively damaging ...


0

ACCLAMATION - noun 1 : a loud eager expression of approval, praise, or assent 2 : an overwhelming affirmative vote by cheers, shouts, or applause rather than by ballot Merriam-Webster Definitions of acclamation: An acclamation, in its most common sense, is a form of election that does not use a ballot. "Acclamation" can also signify a ...


0

There’s a subtle difference in meaning. ‘Of’ the city means ‘of or about the city itself’ or of or about ‘the thing’ that the city is, as a concept. ‘In’ the city means within the city. Inside the concept of the city. Examples ‘of’: of all the cities in the world, Paris is the most beautiful The most exciting feature of the city of Venice is its ...


1

There’s a subtle difference. ‘Of the weather’ refers to ‘weather’ as a concept, overall system,or thing, bearing down on you. The bigger picture. A change ‘of the weather’ is a more permanent, general, or likely-to-continue change or trend, overall. Whereas ‘in’ is more local, near you. Examples ‘of’: There has been a change of the weather in China. It is ...


2

The phrase that begins with "which" modifies the phrase that precedes it. Therefore, the sentence is ungrammatical, because "manifest" has a singular subject: "[The fact that] dependency bugs are pervasive." A correct sentence with similar syntax would be: "Dependency bugs are pervasive, which is why we are careful to..." The real problem here is that you'...


1

Having lived in Minnesota now for 5 years, I can say definitively that the word "for" is used in place of the correct word, "how." Using your example, "Oh, for cute!" ought to be grammatically said, "Oh, how cute!" Another example would be "Oh, for fun." instead should be "Oh, how fun."


0

Isn't Polish your mother tongue by chance? ;) A different situation to consider. You're driving to work in the morning, you're thinking about different things and then, bam!, you realize you'd left the iron on. You couldn't say then, "I reminded myself I'd left the iron on." You say, "I remembered I'd left the iron on."


1

Without any other context, "Mexican Emperor" would normally be interpreted as "Emperor of Mexico". But it can be used in other contexts, like "Mexican Emperor of America", which would then mean the Emperor of America who is Mexican. Or in answer to the question "Which Emperor of China are you referring to?", the answer could be "The Mexican Emperor". This ...


0

They are both fine for use, but I think you've answered your own question. The Emperor of Mexico does sounds a little more specifically related to the context in which you're meaning.


0

Prepositions aren't entirely necessary. They are a student at the University of X, Belgium School of Engineering, Department of Engineering and Computer Science, Communications and Technology program, 5g lab. doesn't look too bad. You might also want to reverse the order: They are interning at the 5g lab, Communications and Technology program, ...


1

The infinitive (or perhaps it should be analyzed as the subjunctive?) gives a sense of completion, while the gerund gives more of a sense of process. So "There is a new approach to solving homelessness" indicates that the approach will help work on the problem of homelessness, while "There is a new approach to solve homelessness" implies that it will ...


1

Complicated titles are mere matters of fact in the academic world. It only gets worse when it's an endowed program or chair. You'd be adding the John Smith School of Engineering Program of Engineering and Computer Science. How you write this is a determined by how you need to present it. If I were writing a novel or a long form description of someone, I'd ...


0

English speakers use the possessive apostrophe ("someone's something") where possible, because it makes sentences more clear to specify a direct object without it also being the object of a prepositional phrase, and it makes nested ownership more clear. Consider the sentence: The toy of the cat of my sister. This is technically correct. It has eight ...


2

The second one is correct. The fragment "John, Sally and Kevin" is the subject, which is a collection of people, therefore making the subject a plural.


1

"Which" in a non-restrictive relative clause can take a sentence as antecedent. In your example, taking the antecedent of "which" to be the sentence "the number of potato products peaked in 2019" makes the example grammatical. The problem is that it is not the peaking of the number that is an increase, but rather that peak number in 2019 itself which is an ...


0

Both are correct and there is not much difference in meaning.It is just a matter of choice.


Top 50 recent answers are included