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2 votes

Explain why we use "a" before "interesting bird" but not "an"

Ditto to Peter and I upvoted his answer. Let me just add one aside: The rule is that "a" is used before a consonant SOUND and "an" before a vowel SOUND. Sometimes a vowel actually ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 36.5k
5 votes

Explain why we use "a" before "interesting bird" but not "an"

Gemini is an AI and its answer is wrong. It states that "An" is used before words with a vowel sound and also "A" is used before words with a consonant sound. Both these rules are ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 5,104
2 votes
Accepted

Is ‘the’ used before a number as determiner, when ‘all’ is used before them?

If you use "all the three", it needs to be specific. The specific rule is just about the only reliable one: "All the three characters I pointed out also have counterparts in ASCII"....
Lambie's user avatar
  • 15k
1 vote
Accepted

What's the subject of the "tipped"

There lay a parcel of Gauloises Caporal cigarettes. [The cigarettes were] tipped, he noticed . . . tipped adj1 4. = filter-tipped adj. Also absol., filter-tipped cigarettes. 1964– Source: Oxford ...
Tinfoil Hat's user avatar
  • 17.4k
0 votes

Synthesis and Transformation

Looking up the terms 'synthesise' and 'transform' on various websites, I'm not sure the latter at least has an agreed definition. Some sites seem to license any correct paraphrasing. Using a ...
1 vote

Capitalization and Use of Acronyms?

"You pays your money and you takes your choice." If you believe in "vox populi, vox dei" then you will be impressed by the Google Ngram of Decision Tree Classifier,decision tree ...
Greybeard's user avatar
  • 42.3k
0 votes

Is it redundant to say something "must be necessarily..."?

I used "necessarily must" in a tweet today, which brought me to here after I posted it. It was in the context of, "you must read this article" but I added the "necessarily&...
Mark's user avatar
  • 1
-2 votes

"It is an advantage learning a foreign language". -> It is an advantage to learn...? (infinitive or -ing)

The original sentence, "It is an advantage learning a foreign language," is incorrect because it doesn't use the right grammar. In English, we usually say "to learn" instead of &...
Elizabeth Williams's user avatar
0 votes

How to analyse "in which"?

"In which" is a prepositional phrase, so it doesn't have a subject. What's tripping you up here is that the noun phrase contains two relative clauses in succession, each modifying different ...
alphabet's user avatar
  • 18.7k
2 votes

What is "What *is*."?

This is the existential "is" = exists OED: to be (v.) I. Without required complement: to have or take place in the world of fact, to exist, occur, happen. I.1.a. To have place in the ...
Greybeard's user avatar
  • 42.3k
6 votes
Accepted

What is "What *is*."?

It’s a perfectly natural and grammatical usage. The OED’s first entry (of entries arranged chronologically by appearance in the language) for is is: is verb I. Without required complement: to have or ...
Tinfoil Hat's user avatar
  • 17.4k
5 votes

What is "What *is*."?

Grammatically, there is nothing special about this phrasing. Any intransitive verb could replace 'is', and 'what' is a relative pronoun replacing the subject of the relative clause. Jiddu knows what ...
Mitch's user avatar
  • 71.6k
0 votes

S is not A but B = S is B but not A

The difference is in the rhetorical usage. The reason we usually see the first version is because it dismantles whatever previous notions the audience had. The speaker is telling the audience that it'...
Devin's user avatar
  • 3
0 votes

Is it acceptable to conjugate the second person singular (thou's -st -est), analogically to the third person's -s -es?

One place to look is NGrams After doing a few dozen of these, maybe you will start to see a pattern.
GEdgar's user avatar
  • 25.2k
0 votes

How to identify adverbs or adjectives correctly in a sentence?

[1] Everything is explained in the above sentence. [2] Everything is explained in the sentence above. Traditional grammar classifies "above" as an adjective in both sentences: In [1] you ...
Greybeard's user avatar
  • 42.3k
0 votes

past tense vs. present perfect?

This depends on the circumstances and on your point of view. (A Comprehensive Graammar of the English Language, Quirk et al. (1985) § 4.19) […] I may have left the key at the office (last night). [5]...
LPH's user avatar
  • 21.7k
0 votes

past tense vs. present perfect?

Choice of the past simple or present perfect depends on the context. For example, if the context is a sports reporter commenting on the game immediately afterwards, then the present perfect is ...
Shoe's user avatar
  • 33.1k
2 votes

How to identify adverbs or adjectives correctly in a sentence?

[1] Everything is explained in the above sentence. [2] Everything is explained in the sentence above. Traditional grammar classifies "above" in [1] as an adjective and as an adverb in [2]. ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 13k
2 votes
Accepted

"As a [noun]" followed by mismatching subject

The target of the property ascribed by the as-phrase does not have to be the subject of the clause. Any rule to the contrary is style advice and not a serious take on the grammar of the construction. ...
DW256's user avatar
  • 9,082
2 votes
Accepted

". . . he can't bear her to look sad."

There are many examples on the internet of sentences containing "can't bear him to be" (some passive) and the like I can't bear him to be away: I can't bear him to be anywhere near me I ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
4 votes

"as" and the subject

I admit that in English the matter you are asking about sits at least close to the boundary between descriptivism and prescriptivism, and that in colloquial conversation you’ll encounter things like ...
PaulTanenbaum's user avatar
8 votes

"as" and the subject

The target of the property ascribed by the as-phrase does not have to be the subject of the clause. Any rule to the contrary is style advice and not a serious take on the grammar of the construction. ...
DW256's user avatar
  • 9,082
1 vote
Accepted

"as" and the subject

You are quite correct. See this question from ELL, particularly the second answer. It's a common error in English.
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 25.9k
3 votes

Clauses in wh-cleft sentences

The structure of the main clause (independent clause) is: What Mary bought [Subject - NP] was [Predicator - Verb] a first edition [Predicative Complement - NP] The subject is a fused relative, which ...
DW256's user avatar
  • 9,082
6 votes

How to diagram "He makes her happy"

I He makes her happy. This structure is of the type SVOC. "C", the complement, is of the particular type called "object complement". he: subject makes : verb form her: object ...
LPH's user avatar
  • 21.7k
0 votes

"so many" vs "too many" in a particular case

I agree with your teacher I would say : “So “ goes with …that ( this thing implies that) And “too “ goes with …to (this thing compared to that) So you could say : I had too many things to do to be ...
Judy D's user avatar
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