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The issue is that no conjunction or punctuation is used to distinguish the two independent clauses: We will not be learning these subjects daily | rather they will be learned weekly as follows: There are two independent clauses, and rather modifies the second clause: Clause 1: We will not be learning these subjects daily Clause 2: Rather they will ...


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Yes, there should be punctuation before rather to separate the two independent clauses. A semicolon would be fine. A comma would be less appropriate because of the lengths of the clauses. Commas are mainly used to separate short independent clauses when they're used in that context. From The Elements of Style (1918): Man proposes, God disposes. To your ...


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Your sentence looks fine. The general rule is that the sentence should make sense if you remove the parenthetical clause, e.g. If there are missing items in your room at the start of the year, you may incur a fine. and the parenthetical clause should parallel the item before it, so you could interchange them. If there are damages to, or missing items ...


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You normally use a comma after the words 'Dear ________' when you write a letter so the comma you have used after the words 'Dear Elliot' should be fine. Also, you can use a comma in the second sentence to indicate a break between the second and third sentence of the text but then you must indicate that both those sentences are one sentence; in your text, it ...


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If you use a comma here, it will be seen as a sort of an elliptical phrase. When I see a sentence like this, I get a feeling that the full one probably sounds something like this: I am reviewing this, (and I need to do it) now. Keep in mind that now can also function as an interjection, usually to change a topic mid-conversation, or to divert attention, ...


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Pinker of Harvard says this about starting a sentence with a conjunction: “You can’t begin a sentence with a conjunction.” Teachers instruct young students that it is incorrect to begin a sentence with a conjunction (and, because, but, or, so, also) because it helps keep them from writing in fragments, Pinker writes, but it’s a lie that adults don’t need to ...


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The question of whether to include a comma before than in a sentence of the form "What better way to do X than with a Y" is ultimately a matter of stylistic preference and stylistic convention. Opposition to including the comma may be prescriptive ("Don't do that") or primarily descriptive ("This is how most people use commas"). Here is a look at these ...


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I agree with the accepted answer, but… …there is still a problem with your sentence caused by a comma — the one following ‘Javascript’. Your sentence is better written without that comma and (arguably) with ‘which’ replaced by ‘that’: JSwibble is an optimizing compiler for the good parts of JavaScript that helps programmers write efficient and type-...


2

Your hunch is right: the online grammar checker is wrong. You don't need a comma here. It's helpful to remember so can mean and so or so that. When it means and so and joins two independent clauses, a comma is generally considered necessary. For example, Programmers can write efficient and type-safe code, [and] so good ones are in high demand. But in your ...


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As (blank) as my witness means that you are swearing upon that particular deity that you will do something. In other words, you risk incurring the wrath of said deity should you not carry out what you are swearing to do.


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I would say 1 or 4. I believe that 1 is probably more correct, but 4 is more in line with how the sentence is actually spoken.


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Commas don't indicate pauses but parts of a sentence, usually. You can't use "I pause when I come to this point in the sentence" as a rule for when to use a comma.


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This isn't a comprehensive answer about the overall use of commas, but it addresses your question directly. I was taught a simple way to remember if a comma should be used in instances like yours. Use a comma if you have a full sentence after "and". For example, sentence one doesn't need a comma. "Apples are healthy." is a complete sentence, but "...


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The first option is written incorrectly because the first letter of the names of people must be capitalized in a sentence. The second option is written incorrectly because it is incorrect to capitalize the first letter of a word after a comma without reason. By default, they are left uncapitalized. The following sentence's structure would work. Hi Betty, ...


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