New answers tagged

1

From Lexico: emphasis: Special importance, value, or prominence given to something. metaphysical: Relating to metaphysics. metaphysics: The branch of philosophy that deals with the first principles of things, including abstract concepts such as being, knowing, substance, cause, identity, time, and space. Metaphysics has two main strands: that which holds ...


1

It appears to derive from a French military expression: From A New and Enlarged Military Dictionary: In French and English; in ..., Volume 2 Doubler les rangs: To form ranks entire, or to throw two ranks into one and thus to diminish the depth of any given number of men by extending their front. Hence to double up or extend the front of any leading line.


1

An important point about the phrase in its own right is that it can serve to draw the reader's attention to something that might otherwise be missed. I felt the phrase "in its own right" in the sentence I quoted sounds weird or unnecessary. Am I right? Not really; it sounds normal and necessary to me, as an example of this way of drawing ...


2

Wrought is an old word that isn't used much any more, when translated into a more modern form, you would use created, shaped, formed and done. Legal system after legal system, is a variation "x after x" as in "time after time" or "case after case", and basically means "there are a lot of x's where this happens".


-1

According to WolframMathWorld, there is is only one regular hexahedron: the cube -- which is what you are calling "the box" in your question. There is no need for you to say anything other than "Think Outside the Regular Hexahedron." Aside: All seven of the topologically distinct convex hexahedra have six faces by definition, but the ...


0

From The Free Dictionary: on (one's) (own) head : Being one's sole responsibility to bear. Because A's friend helped her make the pasta, the quality of the pasta is not the responsibility of A alone, but the responsibility of both A and her friend. As @HotLicks commented, A's lover could not blame A alone for the quality of the pasta: It's not on her head. ...


1

In this context, "wrought" is a mistake. "Wrought" can mean "made, formed, fashioned or manufactured; decorated or ornamented". (There are special meanings for phrases such as "wrought iron", "wrought gold" and "wrought-up".) (The above quoted dictionary definitions are from Chambers.) Sometimes ...


9

In this sentence, the phrases have the following meanings: important in its own right→ its own importance wrought→ created in legal system after legal system→ in one legal system after another   or→ in many legal systems So, to paraphrase: That inquiry has its own importance, as the challenges created by platforms are upending significant areas of ...


1

Imposture means the act or an instance of deceiving others, esp by assuming a false identity Wilful means done intentionally, or (of a person) determined to do exactly as you want, even if you know it is wrong: To take refuge was defined in this earlier question. This is the figurative meaning -- as if taking shelter. So "taken refuge in wilful ...


4

It means that the ceilings were too far away to be clearly (if at all) seen. The ceilings were so far away that they could not be distinguished or recognized with the naked eye as ceilings.


1

If there are variations, the Registrar must make the variations to the particulars entered in the Child Support Register.


1

"It was growing as he watched," means that both events were happening simultaneously. This is more than just a stylistic choice; Martin is stating, "the tree was growing during the time I was watching," and is implying that the tree is growing so fast that he can visually see it grow (which is very unusual). The stylistic part of his ...


0

Since the context of the sentence is the deaths resulting from workplace stress, we can infer that the costs are borne by the industries that employ the workers (via their insurance costs), the workers themselves, or a combination of the two.


1

The author has made a stylistic choice here. You are on the right track to say that he did this to avoid repeating the past tense of "to be" ("were") used as a helping verb by using the simple past for the second verb in each series. In addition to making the sentence more readable, it emphasizes the first verb over the second; i.e., the ...


0

It's difficult to pinpoint exactly why past simple was used, but it could be for eliminating repeating -ing as you have suggested. Usually this mechanism isn't to avoid repetition but to give focus to one of the verbs. But yes they are both continuous in time. The tree was growing at the same time he was watching it grow, and its limbs were becoming ...


1

Unqualified in the following sense by M-W: : not modified or restricted by reservations, complete. an unqualified denial.


0

Attached - joined, fastened, or connected to something. The stepladder is attached to the tree. Abut - touch or lean on. The stepladder abuts the tree.


2

You could try 'eight-cornered'.


1

Pointed Usually you would say <number>-pointed with a hyphen, as in Eight-Pointed rather than Eight Pointed. I wasn't able to find this usage in the dictionary pages for "pointed" itself, but plenty of adjacent concepts mention it, for example... (occult) A seven-pointed star with the construction lines retained. https://en.wiktionary.org/...


0

Many stranger things have happened than turning nouns into verbs or adjectives. In fact, several words have come into existence because of just that. The example sentence in the question looks like a slogan or title, and it's also an admitted play on words anyway. Even if it's not strictly correct, within the context of something appropriately made up, I see ...


0

Keep in mind that index is both a noun and a verb, and indexed is the verb's past participle. Vertex is only a noun and has no such form, so I don't think you'll have much luck finding an appropriate form. Tipped, spired, and cornered are all possibilities, but my favorite is Eight-Pointed. Alternatively, I think Twelve-Edged sounds much more natural and ...


0

The relevant meaning of still is: even; in addition; yet (used to emphasize a comparative) "Will he not grow stronger still?" means "will he not grow stronger than he is now?" It is comparing how strong the boy already is with how strong he will grow if they don't do something to stop him - there is an implication that the boy is ...


1

Well it means the person who's always up to something. You could also use it like : He is the buzziest among the group(celebrity group),he is always making the headlines. It could mean lively, dynamic, energetic or vibrant etc.


1

The most buzzy. This appears to be used for the informal meaning lively, interesting, and modern.


1

I would say "liveliest" is synonymous for the word "buzziest." It's generally an informal term.


1

The paragraph you've quoted is using very 'flowery' and non-standard language, so it's perfectly understandable that it's confusing - it's almost uncomfortable to read even as a natural speaker. I'd assume that the author of the sentence is one of the so-called 'veteran critics' he/she is defending, or at least someone who considers themselves a 'true fan' ...


1

It is clear to me that AIT expects her to do something that benefits USA in Taiwan’s disfavour. Tsai for the Taiwan’s interest could readily find reasons not to do it.


0

These are descriptions from stories of seances and spiritualistic phenomenon by Arthur Conan Doyle. Not, as I have been corrected, from The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes "the quiet of domestic life' refers to the common every day type of mundane not so exciting mode of existence. Here Mr. Homes would have a seance which would take time and concentration....


0

How to change your mind by Michael Pollan "Science has little interest in, and tolerance for, the testimony of the individual; in this it is, curiously, much like an organized religion." Your question is small about two large subjects. On the contrary both Science and Religion are inherently about the individual experience. It is the organization ...


1

The intended parallel is that in both cases, any individual's assertions carry little weight with the establishment. In the case of science, what matters is repeatability. If one person says something works, that isn't persuasive. But if many people independently say the same thing, it becomes more credible to the establishment. The wording of the religion ...


0

So far as the grammatical structure of the sentence is concerned, there is arguably an ambiguity as to whether the management or the process does the ensuring. In view of there being a comma after process, the most natural reading of the sentence is as something like: management must play an important role in this process, which consists in the management's ...


1

From The Free Dictionary: out of (one's) league: Not the proper match for someone, often because the other person is considered superior in some way. Although it can be used in other situations, this phrase is very often applied to romantic partners who are more attractive or wealthy. Let's call the singer Girl 1. I asked around and I heard that you were ...


0

My girl is Jordin's female friend. Jordin's friend heard the man talking. The man was saying that he wished to date Jordin but he thought that Jordin was too good/pretty etc. for him. However he doesn't realise that Jordin likes him too. Jordin has been dreaming about him and would like to date him (she wants to get next to him), she says he is a fool for ...


0

The speaker is saying that they heard from "my girl" that "you" thought the speaker was out of your league - so if the girl is the speaker and the guy is you, the guy thought the girl was too good for him. But the girl seems to not agree (calling him a fool).


1

It should be "will never" or "won't ever". The English used in poetry and songs is not always correct.


0

It means "Will never" or "Won't ever" regret these scars. It's not very good English. Very informal. Some people do speak like that. Maybe you could say less educated people speak like that.


1

It was the hand. There is technically some ambiguity, but we do not talk of people lying half shut, or for that matter parts of the day - a mid-London morning might just as well have been modified by lying half shut.


1

So, if any one man, in his own proper person, afford stuff for a good joke to anybody . . . let him cheerfully allow himself to spend and be spent in that way.* afford stuff for = provide the material for to spend and be spent = to be used


0

This practice can disrupt the children´s privacy, even though parents are not enough aware of its danger. This sentence isn't problematic because of the use of enough, but because of the use of even though. even though - In spite of (something). Given this, the sentence doesn't make sense. The reason is that we expect a negative outcome if we aren't aware ...


1

Can you please tell me whether my reasoning is correct? You are right and the answer "3" is wrong - I like your thinking! You correctly point out that no fishing holes were dug. There were merely attempts at digging them. The simple past perfect, like all simple forms of the verb, indicates a complete action from start to finish - the holes were ...


1

The example seems to me to be a modern attempt at using archaic language. The OED contains no note of "would-be" in this meaning and I doubt that it has been used in that way. Although in the context, "would-be" can be easily understood as having a future intent - "the woman who would be my wife" - "would-be" is a ...


1

This is how other countries do..................(something) This is the way other countries do...............(something) This is what other countries do. (nothing to add because it stands alone as a statement) This is the way other countries use.....................(something)


0

The following Wednesday is the day immediately after the Tuesday in question. Following: coming or happening after something else in order or time: I’m busy on Thursday, but I’m free the following day. (Cambridge Dictionary)


0

A dictionary should give you the various definitions. Brewing is that process through which by means of heating up a substance immersed into a liquid that liquid becomes a solution of that substance in the liquid (beer, coffee, tea, etc.); this concept has given rise to the metaphorical definition of the verb "to brew (up)" used only in the ...


1

I vaguely recall reading this article though I don't recall which issue it was in. To "eat {someone else's} lunch" means to defeat someone else in (usually commercial) competition. It is a common idiom used in business books, especially books on sales, such as "Eat Their Lunch: Winning Customers Away from Your Competition". In this case ...


0

A demented person is someone with dementia. Though demented is more often used as an insult, referring to the dementia stereotype. That is, someone who is demented is said to be acting irrationally [as if they have dementia]. A deranged person is acting insane and is similar to mad or crazy. While not all demented people are seen as deranged, all deranged ...


1

Wiktionary defines delenda as items to be deleted. https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/delenda#Noun


2

It means full speed: “[Go full speed], Josie!” I yelled. “He’s taking all of it.” “She’s [at full speed], Cap. There he goes.” . . . The reel was too hot to hold and the core of line on it was getting thinner and thinner in spite of the Anita going full speed after the fish. “Can you get any more [speed] out of her?” I called to Mr. Josie. “Not in this ...


0

The first thing to note is that the word is stereotypies, not stereotypes In the sentence with children engaged in “motor stereotypies”: rocking, banging their heads, squawking uses", you will note the inverted commas. "rocking, banging their heads, squawking" is in apposition to “motor stereotypies”: So the children are engaged in "...


1

Answering the question in the title: No, because "motor stereotypies" is not a disease, which would need to be the case if the sentence read ... rooms teeming with children having the symptoms of “motor stereotypies": rocking, banging their heads, squawking. The "motor stereotypies", which are then listed, are themselves symptoms ...


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