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0

Very interesting discussion, and although I'm not a native speaker, I would prefer on training :-)


0

The sentence seems clear enough . . . Chains of command are often unclear in unusual, fast-moving crises like the Waco standoff. Which chains of command? The ones between the federal, state, and local agencies Which federal, state, and local agencies? The ones that are involved in law enforcement and CPS. Chains of command [ between the federal, state, ...


1

The sentence is correct, even though I (and I suspect, many others) had to read it twice to be sure I had understood it correctly. To avoid this kind of situation, a writer has to think about how a reader unfamiliar with the background will receive it. Any reader could very well have trouble with nested references. Here we have a massive tripartite ...


2

Both are acceptable and common. In the version with in, the object of a preposition has been relativized; whereas in the version without in an adjunct of location has been relativized. The place she grew up, they didn't seem to teach the kids much religion, and I'm not one for trying to press my religion on anybody, but Mary was so sort of lost -- that way -...


2

You are correct to say that the phrase without "in" is ungrammatical. You don't say "You grew up that place"; it has to be "You grew up in that place". So, out of the two sentences you mention, the only correct one is "What is special about the city you grew up in?". (You may also say "the place in which you grew ...


0

Longman dictionary says: in the hope of doing something (=because you hope that you will do something) Shoppers flocked to the sales in the hope of finding a bargain. Webster dictionary says: : wanting something to be true : hoping that something will happen She went back to the restaurant with hopes of finding her purse there Oxford dictionary says: in ~ of,...


-1

"On" for days and dates,(On Tuesday, on the 17th, on our honeymoon) "in" for general periods of time(in a week, in april, in 2021,)


1

Both are correct. Without further context, it's difficult to be more specific, but in is more "immediate" than on. In could be useful where you are immersing the reader in the action; On might be more appropriate when you are describing things at more of a distance. "Night of wonder" and "all aglow" suggests a poetic or ...


-2

In the hope of is quite singular indicating one hope however, in the hopes of is plural and indicates there is more than one hope.


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Option A would work: "I intend to visit my grandparents during this weekend." Option B would not work. Option C would work: "I intend to visit my grandparents on this weekend." (Same as "on this day...") Option D would not work.


2

It's usually the case that if a preposition works in a sentence, then any other preposition would also be grammatical. However, which you should use depends on your intent - that isn't something we can reliably predict from the rest of the sentence. Here are some examples: The ball bounces on the box. The ball bounces in the box. The ball bounces through ...


0

Moonlight was falling across her bed. across the bed is a prepositional phrase. As in the Cambridge Dictionary cited in the other answer: from one side to the other Moonlight was shining across her bed. [from one side to the other of her bed] Moonlight was spilling across her bed. [from one side to the other of her bed] Moonlight entering a house or ...


0

"Connect to" and "relate with" are concrete and objective.... "Connect with" and "relate to" are abstract and subjective


1

I'm sure that different people will favor different alternatives, but of the three you've offered ("across", "among", and "over"), I prefer "over". However, I'd probably let the object of the preposition dictate which preposition to use. For example: The average cost of a meal in the five cities chosen . . . (since ...


3

First off, The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language does not recognize 'conjunction' as a part of speech. All items categorized under that heading by dictionaries are either subordinators, coordinators, or prepositions depending on their syntactic properties. The two examples you gave do not have though and but serving the same function, and can ...


0

To pull in indicates a change of direction: “She pulled into the parking lot” -> “She turned off a particular road and into the parking lot”. OED 7.b. Of a driver or vehicle: to drive off or to the side of the road, esp. in order to stop. 2001 T. Hanley in M. Hickey Irish Days (2004) 125 This side of Tulla there was a bit of a blind laneway and I'd ...


0

Where are you? (present tense and is quite sufficient). Where are you at? Ending with a preposition? Hell no, someone is asking for where one is, (present tense)). One cannot be “is”and “at” at the time in the same sentence. Same as, “where are you now” vs “where are you”? In that tense, “are now” is improper because are and now have the same meaning and ...


0

First, ending a sentence with a preposition is technically incorrect. Most people do it and few people will complain about it. More importantly, where and at are redundant, plain and simple. Where are you and where are you at mean the same thing in every context, so the 'at' should be dropped. Repeat 'where you are' over and over, and I promise you, 'where ...


0

The preposition "out" usually means "out through" (e.g.: "He went out the back door."). Therefore, you can't say "That product is out stock." On the other hand, "in" is a very common preposition with a variety of meanings, such as in the phrase "in stock." However, I don't know exactly why those ...


5

It's because "in" is a preposition, while "out" is not*. In your examples, "out" is being used as an adjective or an adverb. To have a true opposite for the phrase "in X", we need another prepositional phrase. Some languages have a single word for "out of" (the example that comes to mind right now is Latin, ...


0

Yes , you can, and, what is more you can also use another preposition: "with". backwardness in reading: Thus in examining a child who cannot read , or who has extreme difficulty in reading , it is advisable first to ascertain whether his speech is , or has been , in any way defective , or whether he has been unusually slow in speech ... Reading ...


-1

It doesn't really work with the example provided by the question, though I wouldn't rule out A girl of green eyes and ruddy complexion stepped forward. Also consider some of the following: Intangible things possessed: Joseph wore a coat of many colours. He was a man of very few words. It turned out to be a day of very few surprises. She was a player of ...


1

Of: made or consisting of; having: a woman of great charm (Cambridge Dictionary)


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