New answers tagged

1 vote

initiation into/to/of programming

Translating set phrases The French phrase seems to be a set phrase referring to instruction in computing, but while the word “initiation” is also a word in English, it does not have that exact meaning ...
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0 votes

‘to this end’ or ‘toward this end’ or ‘towards this end’?

To this purpose is another good expression to use as well. To this purpose, an automated parameters extraction procedure is proposed.
-1 votes

Should the verb "impact" be always followed by "on"?

Impact will be followed by 'on' if it is a noun. For ex.: This circumstance will have an impact to my life. However,it should not be followed by 'on' if it is verb. For ex.: This circumstance impacts ...
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1 vote

Should the verb "impact" be always followed by "on"?

Impact will be followed by 'on' if it is a noun. This circumstance will have an impact to my life. However,it should not be followed by 'on' if it is verb. This circumstance impacts my lifestyle.
  • 9
0 votes
Accepted

What does "Stack Exchange" function as in "I love Internet forums, for example Stack Exchange"?

"I love Internet forums, particularly Stack Exchange." "Particularly" is an adverb. The question remains: what is the noun "Stack Exchange"? Rephrasing so that the ...
  • 88
0 votes

From A to B to C to D

The repetition of “to” is clumsy, as the poster is clearly aware. Another option would be just to use a colon and commas: “Our tool will help in the entire lifecycle of software development: ...
  • 11.1k
1 vote

Where to put “to” in this sentence?

Q. “Where to put ‘to’ in this sentence?” A. Nowhere. “From…to” is suitable in this context to give two extreme examples of the problems, and indicate that there are many others. It is perhaps ...
  • 11.1k
0 votes

Where to put “to” in this sentence?

For your question, I tend to agree with @user405662 (who suggested from X through Y to Z in a deleted comment), but I would format it differently. (I've never been keen on using dashes to offset ...
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1 vote
Accepted

Preposition “under” and “above”

Yes, it is - but it's not correct to say that they live in the same flat! We British call an apartment a 'flat' when all the rooms are on the same level. It is possible to have an apartment which ...
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1 vote
Accepted

The use of subsequent to something

It is grammatically correct* but stylistically dreadful. “Subsequent to” is an unnatural Latinate construction consisting of two words with four syllables in place of a common two-syllable English ...
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0 votes

Is "at the beginning" possible without of?

Yes, you can use "at the beginning" without "of" You can say, "At the beginning, start!" You could say, "When you are at the beginning again, compute the numbers.&...
0 votes

Is "at the beginning" possible without of?

I would go for In the beginning That would be uncontroversial.
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0 votes

Is "at the beginning" possible without of?

All your questions answered Google ngram (https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=at+the+beginning+*&year_start=1800&year_end=2019&corpus=26&smoothing=3) For results of phrase ...
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0 votes

Is it right to say "mutually exclusive with"?

I did see attested examples from expert writers of "A be mutually exclusive with B". And I'll wager people can easily understand the intended meaning, thought I am not a grammar expert ...
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0 votes

Preposition after "Credited"

The correct preposition depends on the SUBJECT. The two choices are... Track 1 is mistakenly credited to Mr Ken. The track 1 composer is mistakenly credited as Mr Ken. But in practice I suggest most ...
1 vote
Accepted

What does "with" mean here? And is the "which" clause illegal?

I suppose this is an analysis of some strategy game. The OP would do well to append further information about the extract to get a satisfactory answer.At a cursory glance, there's nothing wrong with &...
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0 votes

Preposition after "Credited"

Both are wrong. With contortions of gymnastic proportions, you can might make an acceptable sentence out of your given sentences. Better to use the idiomatically used phrase "give credit"(...
  • 1,718
0 votes

Is "a rant on <topic>" equivalent to "a rant about <topic>"?

"Rant about" is more common than "rant on". Google ngram This is the google book search result for "rant on" Used as a verb, I would always use it with 'about'; used as ...
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