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5 votes

What is meaning of for in "for Christmas"?

Three of the definitions found in MACMILLAN: for "used for stating the purpose of an object or action" "relating to or concerning someone or something" (14) "in order to ...
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0 votes

What is the meaning of " grappling with disparate answers"?

grapple has a long history. Online Etymology grapple (v.) 1520s, "seize and hold fast," originally in reference to a ship, by means of a grapple, from grapple (n.). Extended sense of "...
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0 votes

Use of "insight of" in a sentence

In sight of, yes. Insight of, absolutely no. Eg: He was in sight of reaching his goal of becoming CEO. The student gained insight into his professor's extraordinary teaching gifts early in the ...
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-1 votes

Can "due" meaning "owed" be used without "to" in AmE? e.g. "the recognition which was due her"

You are assuming that 'due' here follows a definition that is synonymous with 'owed'. ...tries to salvage the dignity owed (to) the situation... Which is why the lack of 'to' seems a bit jarring to ...
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0 votes

Can "due" meaning "owed" be used without "to" in AmE? e.g. "the recognition which was due her"

In American English, may we use "due" without the "to"? Yes (I speak US English), but not in the sentence you're proofreading: ...tries to salvage the dignity due the situation ...
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12 votes

Can "due" meaning "owed" be used without "to" in AmE? e.g. "the recognition which was due her"

I am also British, but to me the original phrase sounds correct and has a different meaning to what you are trying to correct it to. "...tries to salvage the dignity due the situation" ...
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32 votes

Can "due" meaning "owed" be used without "to" in AmE? e.g. "the recognition which was due her"

As a native speaker of AmE, I find that the recognition due her sounds fairly standard to me (leaving aside the spoken similarity with do her). The alternative ...due to her does seem clearer, and it'...
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-1 votes
Accepted

"Lecture notes in" or "Lecture notes on"

american-english "On" to me is a shorthand for "on the topic of," e.g. "Lecture Notes on (the topic of) Data Engineering and Communications Technologies," while "in&...
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1 vote

"Lecture notes in" or "Lecture notes on"

Ngrams shows both in use with comparable frequency
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0 votes

Difference between "across the year" and "throughout the year"?

The "across" version is quite unusual, and the "throughout" version sounds a bit stilted. The most common way of expressing this (I'm imagining an annual performance review): I'...
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0 votes

Difference between "across the year" and "throughout the year"?

For USA standard English speech and writing, "across the year" is unusual and uncommon, although it is understandable as a phrase referring to a one-year time period (a calendar year or the ...
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  • 2,765
0 votes
Accepted

What is the best preposition in this sentence? "Since the 1960s, ——— the ascent of Noam Chomsky, the consensus has been that

So I want to know what makes “with” the best preposition for the original sentence. With has the sense of accompanied by - "Since the 1960s, [which were] accompanied by the ascent of thinkers ...
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2 votes
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Usage of the phrase "to which" in this mathematical explanation

This is a case where mathematics is assisted by precise English usage. I will tease it apart and try to illustrate with a specific example. A is a set of elements. B is a second set of elements. f  is ...
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3 votes

throwing roses in the museum gallery to slack-jawed guests

"To" can be used by an observer who views the thrower sympathetically, and "at" by someone less supportive.
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0 votes

Proper use of "out to lunch", "out for lunch" and "out at lunch"

“Out to lunch” is an idiom which means ‘inattentive’, ‘crazy’ or ‘mad’: ”So do I take this guy seriously or is he out to lunch?”(Cambridge dictionary) Even ‘out for’ is unclear. We need to include ...
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1 vote

How do I know what to use "in society" or "on society"?

As a native British English speaker, I believe "on society" feels better than "in society". "Society" is the thing being directly affected here, by a commercial / ...
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3 votes
Accepted

How do I know what to use "in society" or "on society"?

On would mean that an outside force would have an impact on the entire society. In would mean that a force inside society would have some impact within the boundaries of said society, and not ...
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2 votes

Is the "of" in "a lot of" a preposition?

Yes, of is a preposition, wherever it appears. It can't be anything else. However, it appears in a lot of idioms. As such, it has essentially no meaning; of -- or a ghost of of, like the -a in kinda --...
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