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anger with something (rather than someone)?

I would say "with" a person or group, and "at" an inanimate object or perceived slight...
John A Ramsden's user avatar
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Your health and well-being are of paramount concern to us. What does 'of' mean here?

preposition of can be used to express the notion of "attribute". Your comfort and safety during the flight are a matter of great concern to Boing-Boing Airlines. Your comfort and safety ...
TimR's user avatar
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1 vote

Deck as verb and the accompanying preposition

The final preposition is the dispositive one. deck out in deck out with in is used with attire and things worn with is used with ornaments, flowers, baubles, etc P.S. The verb deck out (in) is ...
TimR's user avatar
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Past Perfect or Simple Past When Using Since in Reported Speech?

Certainly! Both versions are grammatically correct, but they convey slightly different nuances. Let’s break it down: “It had been three years since they met.” This sentence uses the past perfect tense ...
user522380's user avatar
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Deck as verb and the accompanying preposition

Your understanding is quite accurate! Let’s break it down: “Decked with”: This phrase is commonly used to describe objects, places, or things that are adorned or decorated with something. For instance:...
user522380's user avatar
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What preposition is the proper one to follow the noun “hatred”?

What is the proper preposition to follow the noun hatred? There is no "proper" preposition. The preposition should be semantically and contextually appropriate. The number of occurrences of ...
Greybeard's user avatar
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0 votes

Deck as verb and the accompanying preposition

However, I see two ways of using the verb in practice: deck with and deck out in Note that the "out" functions as an adverb and is not necessary We decked [out] the halls with boughs of ...
Greybeard's user avatar
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Is it 'buy-in to', 'buy into', or 'buy in to' in the following sentence

I believe "into" generally implies entering (for example, "log into"). And "buy in" is the verb: "If you can't sell out, buy in!" Thus, it's "buy in to,&...
Maxwell Pollock's user avatar
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How can you rephrase the following sentence to not end in "with"?

I might be using 'whom' where 'who' would be more appropriate, but I suggest the following rewording to avoid ending your sentence on a preposition: I turned down the university's acceptance in order ...
Rich's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

On team, in team, or from team?

All three prepositions are in use... ...and I can't see any reason to suppose they aren't all completely interchangeable in any given context. Prepositions are often flexible in English. Asking which ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
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"on here" vs "in here" for websites

The use of "on here" sounds fine when addressing fellow members of an online chat platform or website of which one is a member. Eg., Those of us on here need to come to an agreement.
Trish's user avatar
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1 vote

anger with something (rather than someone)?

When referring to abstract conditions, it's common to use either "over" or "about". I'm angry about the poor pay for public school teachers.
Barmar's user avatar
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3 votes

anger with something (rather than someone)?

As for the collocation of propositions after the term anger there are a few options as suggested by Oxford Collocation Dictionary: PREP. in ~ He raised his voice in anger. | with ~ His face was ...
user 66974's user avatar
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5 votes

anger with something (rather than someone)?

I know that anger comes with the preposition "with" while discussing anger directed at someone, This is not so. *(e.g. "your anger with your unbearable boss") Anger collocates ...
Greybeard's user avatar
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0 votes

"At" vs. "in" followed by a city name

When referring to settlements, it's almost exclusively "in" rather than 'at'. Though there's no real reason 'AT a city' can never be used in lieu of 'IN a city', it's simply very non-...
Costillo's user avatar
0 votes

Should I use "awe of" or "awe at"?

I am not a grammarian. I have a sense that "in awe at" expresses a relationship to an entity or condition at a distance, perhaps e.g. future, where "in awe of" speaks of an ...
richard e. shore's user avatar

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