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How can a preposition modify its object? I thought prepositional phrases modify nouns and verbs.


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To be a bit more precise, englishgrammar explains: The structure as…as is used to compare things that are of similar proportion. In this case the first as acts as an adverb modifying the adjective or adverb that goes after it. The second as can act as a preposition or conjunction. If it is used as a preposition, it will be followed by a noun or pronoun. If ...


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Welcome to EL&U, Joe! The structure as + adjective/adverb + as is used to compare things that are similar in some way. For example: She was as cold as ice. Your cat is as big as a dog. He eats as quickly as I do (or ...as quickly as me.) I am as hungry as you are. Your example isn't perfect. Sloths aren't necessarily tired: they just move slowly! But of ...


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It is/was heavily raining here. Or 2. It is/was raining heavily here. In the examples, it is important to keep the continuous form of the verb as the position of the adverb is semantically significant. Consider: 3 “The meal was quickly cooking.” = the meal was cooking without delay / The meal was soon cooking. This can also be expressed as 3a “Quickly, ...


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They are both prepositions. In the first, out does not form a phrase with the water bottle as it is possible to switch their position: Don't throw out the water bottle. Don't throw the water bottle out. Its function here is a particle - a single word that is allowed in combination with a particular verb. Particles can be verbs, adjectives, or prepositions. ...


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Lots and none at all. "Out" is prepositional, not adverbial, but "out the water bottle" is a misunderstanding, not a phrase. If they're to be separated then "out" belongs not with the bottle but necessarily with "throw." It might in some odd circumstance be possible to use "The bottle out…" as an answer to &...


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Adverbs can modify verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs. There are no other adverbs in the sentence, so that's ruled out. The only real possibilities are the verb phrase "am with", and the adjective "best". The term "arguably" means that something may not be objectively true, but you're expressing a common opinion that it's true....


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As @ Andrew Leach has pointed out, the meaning of the sentence is not entirely clear. One solution is to hyphenate two words: I can smell her obviously newly-ironed hair. Another solution is to hyphenate three words: I can smell her obviously-newly-ironed hair. Granted, this doubly-hyphenated word is unusual and probably used rarely. A more natural-...


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