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Both "He is cowardly" and "He is intelligent" are correct. English does not distinguish between adjectives of quality and adjectives of condition. In both cases the verb "to be" is used in exactly the same way. This is different from (for example) Spanish, which has different verbs, ser and estar, depending on the adjective.


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It might be an adverb, or it might not be, depending on which "authority" you want to listen to. The English language has been around for much longer than our attempts to systematize it and slap labels on things, and our fumbling attempts to do so are crude at best. There's clearly no dispute here about meaning or usage, and it diagrams nicely either way, so ...


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It's used as part of a set phrase which acts as an adjective. That being said, it's easy to imagine an adverb answering the question "how", as in Q: "How blue is the sky?" A: "It's dark blue." <- possibly an adverb, with the meaning that it's mostly black and a little bit blue or A: "It's slightly blue" <- definitely an adverb


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Absent more context it's hard to tell, but "When I met him first time" sounds like unremarkable casual speech. It's not technically valid syntax (being an elided form of "when I met him for the first time"), but it is easily understood and would not shock the listener.


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The answer to the question “Why is dark an adverb in this sentence?” is that it is not one; that source is wrong. That’s because dark cannot ever be an adverb, let alone here. It’s just that color-words can behave somewhat curiously. We have various related questions about this curiosity, including this one. John Lawler’s suspicion about color words having ...


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Adjectives are used to describe nouns, i.e. the car is red. Adverbs are most commonly used to describe verbs, i.e he fought valiantly But adverbs can also describe adjectives. How is the car red? Is it blazingly red? Is it cheesily red? Cheekily red maybe? That is the case for your sentence. The sky is blue. How is it blue? Darkly. It is not being blue ...


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Your teacher is wrong. Frequency adverbs can be placed: before the main verb (if the verb is not "to be"). Examples: He never eats vegetables. They will always regret doing this. after the verb (if the verb is "to be"). Example: He is often late for work. some frequency adverbs (eg usually, normally, often, frequently, sometimes): in the beginning OR in the ...


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There are a lot of possibilities. The best ones I can think of to fill in "Disposal ____" are: clerk agent specialist worker delegate


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Out of my above list, in the given context, I would nominate appallingly Based on the adjective appalling [Macmillian]: very unpleasant and shocking I will note that I choose this term because, in the OP's example context, "ungodly" is being used in the sense of "excessive" or "unreasonable". Per Collins, definitions 2 & 3: adjective [...


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The OED has an entry for ungodlily. There are no examples more recent than 1860, but the ones provided are as follows: 583 J. Field Godly Exhortation sig. Cjv Being thus vngodlilie assembled, to so vnholy a spectacle. 1645 E. Pagitt Heresiogr. 54 Ungodlily alledging the..Scripture. 1674 Govt. Tongue 114 'Tis but an ill essay of ...


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Since a Boolean function produces one binary output by definition, it's not really correct to say what you're trying to say. How about something like this: In electronics, a logic gate is usually an idealized or physical device implementing a Boolean function; that is, it performs a logical operation on one or more binary inputs and produces a binary ...


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There is an adverb of place, and an adverb is used to modify a verb. In the sentence— We stayed there for three nights, stay is a verb and there is modifying it. it's answering us the question— where did we stay? To make the sentence more understandable a semi colon could have been put between both the sentences.


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Ever means 'at any time'. So, “Have you seen?” is said when you are asking someone if they have seen a particular person or thing in a specified short period of time maybe this hour or this day. While, “have you ever seen?” is spoken when you are asking someone if they have seen a particular person or thing at any time maybe even once in their whole life. ...


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"Ever" means "at any time", so it does add meaning to the statement. However, there are only some situations where the context requires that you qualify what you mean by including "ever", so I can understand why you might think it sometimes unnecessary and only there for emphasis. If you were talking about one single thing that you either have or have not ...


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I can understand your concern,but we humans are social animals and hence our sentences need to sound polite. And therefore 'Let's go somewhere warm and sunny.' is the correct alternative. Saying 'somewhere' indicates that we are giving a good status/value to the place we are referring. Also, it indicates we are asking the other person to spend time with us ...


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