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2 votes

In what varieties of English is "working" used (as a gerund) instead of "work" (as a noun)?

As Bold Ben says, in British English it's quite normal to refer to 'showing your workings' in a mathematical context. You don't just give the answer (which might just be a guess!), you have to show ...
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  • 17.7k
1 vote

What does it mean for RFC 3339 to be "a profile of" ISO 8601?

The standard ISO 8601 is not publicly accessible but there is a preview of its part including Terms and definitions: https://www.iso.org/obp/ui/#iso:std:iso:8601:-2:ed-1:v1:en:term:3.1.2.1 There we ...
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1 vote
Accepted

What is a good verb to be used with ‘possibilities’ in this context?

"Maintain" is not proper. "Hold" would do depending on the context; if, for instance, you are considering a set of legal possibilities that result from a certain politics, and if ...
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  • 13.1k
1 vote
Accepted

What is the usage of "considerably" outside of comparative constructs?

Wiktionary, while not proscribing the use of considerably with a positive (not comparative ...) adjective, hardly implies that such a use is normal: considerably [adverb] Positive: considerably // ...
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0 votes

When does "actively mislead" entail an intent to deceive?

Mislead is a euphemism for lie. It always suggests an intent to deceive, but does not entail it logically, since human intention is not a logical conclusion (the way the truth of She killed him ...
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  • 99.6k
1 vote

When does "actively mislead" entail an intent to deceive?

Actively mislead can certainly suggest intent; its range of meaning is visible in the definition of actively (Oxford English Dictionary, "actively, adv.," def. 1). By one's own action; ...
0 votes

The word "glee": How prevalent is the aspect of 'schadenfreude' in normal use?

From Vocabulary.com Definitions of glee noun great merriment synonyms:gleefulness, hilarity, mirth, mirthfulness see more noun malicious satisfaction synonyms:gloat, gloating There is a negative view ...
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  • 1
0 votes

The word "glee": How prevalent is the aspect of 'schadenfreude' in normal use?

I have heard it used where is to describe someone with a low level of responsibility or someone who is insane, as in the glee of irresponsibility or the glee of insanity. I picture these people ...
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  • 1
8 votes

Bot, za and the like

Apheresis is definitely much older than the 60s and not limited to only Murican English. Why? Just 'cause (from the mid 15th century). If you include words where the initial vowel was lost then there ...
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  • 56.3k
0 votes

Does anyone use "misconstruct" (instead of "misconstrue") anymore?

I think misconstruction is still understood as a noun form of the same word. (Better than "misconstrual", for example. [e.g. my/your spellchecker liked the former, but not the latter!]. So ...
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0 votes

Meaning of "misuse of time" in this context

Given this collocation: lack of comprehension, inappropriateness to readership, and misuse of time the word time cannot refer to tense because then the other words would have to be in the same vein. ...
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  • 11.7k
0 votes

Origin of the word "spraunce"

I concur with ‘spraunce’ and ‘sprauncing’ as a familiar (to my ear) usage, and implying ostentation and affectation in speech or behaviour. The Fools and Horses reference rung true, but I’m sure I’ve ...
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  • 1
1 vote

What are the origins of "tech" as an abbreviation for "technology?

Tech Toons cartoon - Colorado Transcript newspaper, July 23, 1967
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  • 14.2k
5 votes

Difference between "provocative" and "thought-provoking"

Meanings of provocative tend towards the negative but are not necessarily so. Cambridge 1 causing thought about interesting subjects: The programme will take a detailed and provocative look at the ...
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  • 22.2k
3 votes

Is it common for native English speakers to confuse "18th century" with "the 1800s"?

Yes, it's a common mistake. The confusion arises from the fact that there are two common conventions for grouping consecutive years into centuries, and that the boundaries of the resulting centuries ...
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0 votes

Is it common for native English speakers to confuse "18th century" with "the 1800s"?

Not only English speakers, but the other language speakers are in the same boat. While talking about centuries, just add one to the first two digits of the year.
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  • 145
2 votes

Is it common for native English speakers to confuse "18th century" with "the 1800s"?

Yep. Done it several times (including on schoolwork). One of the most infuriating things about the english language and history. For reference, I’m a native english speaker.
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2 votes

Is it common for native English speakers to confuse "18th century" with "the 1800s"?

There is a simple way to check how common the use of numbering historical periods by centuries. Put into a translation programme the English '18th century' and translate it into as many languages as ...
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  • 9,495
24 votes

Is it common for native English speakers to confuse "18th century" with "the 1800s"?

Yes, I have seen and heard many native speakers of English make the same mistake. And it works exactly the same way in Dutch: you say de 18e eeuw when you mean 1700–1799. And Dutchmen frequently make ...
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46 votes

Is it common for native English speakers to confuse "18th century" with "the 1800s"?

As a first-language English speaker, my experience is that I have come to automatically associate the specific terms "20th century" and "21st century" with the 19--s and 20--s ...
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  • 73.3k
0 votes

"Best" as a sign-off in a chat message

It usually would not come off as ending a conversation forcefully because it’s a standard, neutral-positive way to sign off. In any context where you are writing your name at the bottom, like an email,...
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-1 votes
Accepted

"I wonder what to start work on" - does it sound fine?

I wonder what to start work on This suggests you could possibly begin work on a desk or something similar. I wonder what to start working on This means there is something (a project for example) on ...
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1 vote

Can "recall" be used in an imperative sense?

A different sense of 'recall" is often used in the imperative , the sense meaning "to call back". For example: Sergent, recall the patrol. That is clearly an imperative sentence, but ...
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1 vote

Difference between 'spake' and 'spoke'?

Bare and bore are not different tenses. They are both past tense of bear. But bare is archaic and never used now. Same with sware and swore - both past tense of swear.
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