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You don't need quotation marks in the list. The function of the quotation marks in your example 1 is to make sure the reader understands exactly where each question begins and end. Because your list has a numbered item on each line, there is no confusion. If this were a publication, an editor would take them out straightaway. Similarly, you don't need semi-...


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An apostrophe showing possession always goes after the thing that is doing the possessing. You might not think of a week as possessing time, but that is actually what it's saying - the amount of time that is contained within a week. It often helps to turn the phrase around in your head to make it clearer: The girl's toys: the toys belonging to the girl ...


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My two answers would be: 1) Did you send the revised report? I have not seen it. 2) Have you sent the the revised report? I have not seen it. (I would keep the same tense for both the sentences) (*) (*) way preferred imo :-)


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I don't think a single comma would be acceptable, as it would separate "If" from the condition making the reduced sentence: [If for any reason,] you are not 100% satisfied with the quality of our services, we will refund 100% of your money back. This sentence does not make sense. (I would also add the percent sign after 100). However, if you can use ...


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There is no need for a comma in this sentence. However, the section from 'I received..." onward is not an independent sentence; in fact, "the laptop repair service I received from your service center" is a noun phrase, so there is no benefit to putting a comma in to break it up. You could say 'that I received', or (better in my opinion) 'which I received......


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Here is the relevant portion of the original sentence: Its long, damp passages, its narrow cells and ruined chapel, were to be within her daily reach. I would interpret it in this way: Its long, damp passages (its narrow cells and ruined chapel) were to be within her daily reach. → Its long, damp passages were to be within her daily reach. In ...


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Find one, and silence its harrowing cry. In this sentence, the comma is used after the first independent clause and is used to join it with the other clause using coordination conjunction and. Because the sentence is short and easily understandable; the comma can be omitted in this case. Your sentence then becomes: Find one and silence its harrowing cry....


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Definitely without the comma. "The topics we will be covering on day 1" is all part of the same clause; "we will be covering on day 1" doesn't work on its own. If it was a separate clause you would use a comma; imagine something like "You can find the topics below, the course will be starting on day 1." (Though I'd probably prefer a semi colon in that ...


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Your sentence: Please first look at our wiki space or contact your local site-ops before opening a ticket, if you would like us to look into an issue, or have a change request, please open a JIRA ticket. As it is, your sentence is both a comma splice and a run-on sentence. Let's punctuate it a little better. That involves changing a run-on sentence into ...


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(1) "That" is more than redundant; it is incorrect. We would use it before unquoted reported speech - he commented that he had such a cold that [someone's] sarcastic remarks were hardly making any effect on him. You original sentence would be acceptable without 'that'. (2) You asked: Also about punctuation; "I have such a miserable cold, your ...


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It's a mistake to think that the second part of the sentence is not a complete independent clause. It simply has an elided pronoun that is assumed to exist: The students were highly engaged in the revision process, and they commented on the benefits of giving and receiving feedback through the system. Whether or not there has to be a comma there is more ...


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If the apostrophe in "ar't" is simply an error by the author, it is not the only one on this page. For example, I note three occurrences of the word "did[']st"—two without an apostrophe (didst) and one with an apostrophe (did'st). The presence or absence of the apostrophe in the case of didst is arguably acceptable either way—since didst could be read as a ...


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Your first scenario, the whole "How to build a smart car" should be treated as a noun phrase. If you want to add a question mark, it is more common to expect a full question, including the Wh- word or adverb. You'd need: how (in this case), an auxiliary verb to form the interrogative, subject, main verb, complements and finally the question mark. How do ...


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Fisrt, let me add number to each comma in the sentence. For most people,(1) football might just be a game,(2) but for me,(3) it is a way of life. Actually, there are precise rules about using commas. See A Guide To Proper Comma Use - Business Insider Contrary to popular belief, commas don't just signify pauses in a sentence. In fact, precise ...


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You are right. There should be no comma after the adjective. You would only use commas when there are multiple adjectives. For example, "The small, unripe banana". Note that commas separate only the adjectives, so there is no comma following the final adjective.


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No, there should not be a comma between an adjective and the noun it is modifying. He reiterated his plea for a loose confederation with considerable autonomy for the confederating units. The inclusion of information within brackets does not make a difference as the use of parenthesis is to break from the rest of the sentence and then return to it. You ...


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You are asking what your reader will think if you violate a convention of punctuation. One of the truly great writers of the 20th century, Samuel Beckett, began his novel, Murphy as follows:- The sun was shining, having no alternative, on the nothing new. This is a far greater violation of convention than yours. It shocks the reader with something ...


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The capitalization is correct, and a third option you could consider is “What’s that—a dishrag?” using an em dash. This punctuation guide may interest you.


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