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"using their long name and cryptic variable names" can be considered as parenthetical; it's not grammatically necessary to the sentence, so it could be placed in commas or brackets. The same could also apply to "based on a given variable availability", which could be set off, and should receive the same treatment as the first ...


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I agree with JK2 but would add that all adverbs have a "natural" position within a sentence and this position does not require commas: [Nothing was found,] therefore all of the test animals were re-examined. [Nothing was found,] all of the test animals, therefore, were re-examined. [Nothing was found,] all of the test animals were, therefore, re-...


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I don't think using commas around therefore has anything to do with the adverb being restrictive or not. Even without the surrounding commas, therefore is not restricting anything. It merely connects between a prior sentence to the current sentence with or without the surrounding commas. With the commas it is presented separately from the main clause, ...


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It looks like the consensus in the comments is that there is no strict rule here. It also looks like the actual rule is either to follow whatever guidelines one needs to follow, or, in the absence of such guidelines, follow whatever is clearer. It also looks like the shorter the sentence, the less chance the comma will be needed, and the longer it is, like ...


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This is basically a question you could ask on Literature SE, but what it looks like is a literary technique called stream of consciousness. Wikipedia defines it as a metaphor describing how thoughts seem to flow through the conscious mind (i.e. without interruptions). In literature, stream of consciousness writing is a literary device which seeks to portray ...


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The correct way to punctuate this is (keeping your single quote convention in place): ‘No Sweyn, I think the ring was given along with this’—there was a muffled thud—‘in payment for someone to die.’ Note these are em dashes, not hyphens. This is a stylistic concern, rather than a grammatical one, but the convention is firmly established by a majority of ...


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Is there any style or grammar guide that recommends or accepts this? There’s nothing I’m aware of that exactly fits the approach you describe, but two style guides come close. I do freelance editing for a major UK-based content (marketing) company. Their style guide requires that direct speech is to be enclosed in double quotation marks, and “Use single ...


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We were unable to find any style guide which suggests exactly this. It seems that there are only a few cases of individuals who do it because they come from a programming background or for other reasons.


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I like to use the "¢" character. Most everyone is familiar with the symbol, is found on most keyboards, is rarely used to express units of currency, and the English pronunciation echos the word "sentence".


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