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When I checked the online Miriam-Webster dictionary, it describes river as: A large natural flow of water that crosses an area of land and hoes into an ocean, a lake etc. This description of river as a 'flow' is obviously in contrast to a lake or ocean that doesn't flow. To say 'a river is flowing' can be used as a form of emphasis as in the 'rain that is ...


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Terrible question, but I would go with "No" because you insurance has already started. It would be helpful to know more about this document and/or the context to understand what is most relevant or important to the entity that is asking the question - whether you have enrolled in a plan, or whether you currently have coverage.


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The following answer is particularized to a question from user Ken N which has been closed but referred to the question on the present page. Its text is repeated here for convenience. QUESTION An important legal result hinges on the meaning of the word "any" in this sentence: "If the effect of the domiciliary requirement under subparagraph (A)...


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In this sentence, "as" means "because" or "since" -- not "before."


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“Going home” here means that participant was eliminated from a reality TV competition (in this case, Strictly Come Dancing). It’s pretty a pretty common expression in this context. Here are some examples: Elimination Tracker: Here’s Every Celeb Who’s Gone Home on Dancing With the Stars This Season (and Why!) ‘American Idol’s Disney Night — Did the Right ...


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The SOED (Shorter Oxford English Dictionary) agrees with your three definitions. It puts the definitions as: Pursuing an indirect or winding course; circuitous, rambling. Deviating from the straight way, erring. Subtly cunning, wily, unscrupulous, dishonest. Examining the possible correlations of these definitions with your four sentences in question, I ...


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Up and down is an adverb unto itself: so as to move upward and then downward repeatedly // jumping up and down Source: Merriam Webster—up and down So, lift up and down twice means move upward and then downward x 2.


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Your question is interesting. Dictionaries differ on their approach to adverbs. For example, the Merriam Webster online only defines deviously as the adverb derived from devious. The Cambridge Dictionary online, on the other hand, offers a separate definition for deviously which goes some way to justifying your doubts, which I share. The Cambridge ...


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Examples 1, 3, and 4 seem to best fit with definition 2: "Departing from the correct or appropriate way" and implies a moral judgment as well, i.e., we know a sensation should not feel good, and yet it does. Example 2 (in the absence of context for the phrase "still slopes deviously") seems to best fit definition 1 "Indirect" ...


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