New answers tagged

0

Question Which expression is not ambiguous? "All but one green apples are bad." or "All green apples but one are bad." To begin, I would rephrase the first sentence as "All but one of the green apples are bad." Now, to answer your question, neither sentence is ambiguous: they both mean all the green apples are bad except one. ...


3

To some extent, OP's example "puns" on the overlapping senses of a pair = one set OR two items and odd = not even (of integers, not a multiple of 2) OR unusual... pun Cambridge Dictionary a humorous use of a word or phrase that has several meanings or that sounds like another word ...but I don't think it's quite a "pun". It's just... ...


0

The commenters have been kind to point out that the term 'ad hominem' is not incorrect in this context. But there are subtypes of ad hominem with their own names that avoid the association with 'man.' The examples in the question seem to me like cases of poisoning the well. And if you happen to be American corporations are people in your country /shrug


-1

Grammatically, there is no ambiguity in this sentence. "Water" is the subject of two predicates: "froze" and "didn’t melt." The same water is performing (or not performing, in the second case) both actions. I don't think that there is an ambiguity semantically, either. It's been a while since I've studied physics, but if I ...


-3

Affirm (defined by Lexico) 1reporting verb State as a fact; assert strongly and publicly. with object ‘he affirmed the country's commitment to peace’ More example sentencesSynonyms declare, state, assert, aver, proclaim, pronounce, attest, swear, avow, vow, guarantee, promise, certify, pledge, give one's word, give an undertaking View synonyms 1.1with object ...


0

Both the cases you describe are examples of confirmation. "Confirm" has two meanings, that of stating that something is indeed true or correct, or of asking someone to state that something is true or correct. Native English speakers understand both usages. The second meaning is also called "asking for confirmation". So if you wanted to ...


0

The confusion is because "any one" is modified by a phrase that comes after "would think." The syntax could be rearranged: [My blunders are] a more common occurrence than any one who only knew me through your memoirs would think. Regarding your proposed paraphrases, this means "something happened that people think is very rare, but ...


0

There is no ambiguity in the phrase "until next week". But it is not exact either. A week lasts a week, so "until next week" applies to any point within that period. Your boss might re-appear on Monday. She might re-appear on Friday. She could be off the whole of next week as well, being on leave until the end of next week (which is also &...


Top 50 recent answers are included