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I'd posit that if "circumstellar" can be used to describe something in the vicinity of a star, "circumsolar" could be used to denote something within our own system, specifically.


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A successful euphemism has to accomplish two things at the same time: it has to preserve the decorum and the dignity of everyone concerned and it has to accurately convey the unpleasant truth. An expression that fails the first condition is not a euphemism, but a crude, insulting statement; an expression that satisfies the first condition but fails the ...


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You could say they're "not on track," that they're "not on track to reach X by Y," or that there's "room for improvement." You could reframe it collaboratively as "we aren't on track," or "we have room for improvement." The trick with most of these will be focusing on the desired outcome and how to reach it, ...


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My kids' school uses developing for your purpose in grades K-5 (ages 5-11). Joey is still developing his strategies for multiplication. The antonym is secure. However, Joey's knowledge of simple fractions is secure. Developing is a good solution for poor or unsatisfactory performance. However, "unacceptable" performance should be stated without ...


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“Has yet to achieve his full potential” Of courses he may have already achieved it, but let’s pretend.


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Was there any old usage of position indicating adjectives in English... like Potter stood in the "twoeth" place in the class or Rachel was in "foureth" place, No, first second and third were irregular but the rest are regular. forma - first ōðer - second (compare Modern English "other") þridda - third You seem to be confusing ...


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I    (source of the paraphrasing below: CGEL) Fundamental in the concept of determiner, the article is a particular type of determiner called central determiner (three forms: a, an, the). There are two other types of determiners: the predeterminers and the postdeterminers. She followed her father in his travels to all the many faraway countries where he had ...


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A rather silly question. Yellow, green and brown are all colours covering parts of the spectrum of visible light, although brown is not a traditional spectral colour and is usually associated with some darkening of the yellow, red and orange that it comprises. The rainbow contains all visible wavelengths, some of which are not in yellow, green and brown. But ...


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How about noble? From Lexico: noble: Having or showing fine personal qualities or high moral principles and ideals.


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"Opportune" is a hair archaic (having peaked in the 20s), and is rarely used outside of the idiom "opportune time" (though "opportune moment" appears to be gathering inertia as of late). The construction in the quote is not particularly common, but apparently not unheard of, and it would generally be understood.


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Merriam-Webster gives the definition as 1: suitable or convenient for a particular occurrence //an opportune moment //the legal authorities helped by the opportune use of their powers of arrest — T. E. Vedney 2: occurring at an appropriate time //an opportune offer of assistance //The book's publication is opportune. Thus, when something is convenient for ...


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The following site notes that this unusual usage of the term opportune is common in Nigerian English. There is evidence, however, of its use also in other contexts: Opportune: When we use the word “opportune” in Nigeria, we do so in relation to the word “opportunity.” We add the suffix “ed” to give it a feel of something from the past. You often hear ...


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I would have thought something like "uncorrupted", "unblemished" or "unsullied" perhaps?


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The perception that there is something paradoxical or nonsensical about belated happy birthday and its variants is due to taking happy birthday itself at face value, that is, as an expression of a wish that the addressee's birthday (one particular day) be happy. However, when people say happy birthday, their wishes are usually not specifically focused on ...


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It is difficult to find relevant example sentences in reputable dictionaries, though Wiktionary does perhaps allow the broadened sense: last night ... (often used adverbially) The evening or night immediately before the present. He said he didn't get any sleep last night and I know he hadn't gotten much the previous night. ... Synonyms yesterday night ... ...


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I would use "not self aware" which doesn't sound good, and I would think hypocritical would be the next best synonym.


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It comes down to whether or not one is still producing those series of events. If one were to quit cigarettes, then the last cigarette they smoked, would be the "last one". If that same person were to smoke again, that newest cigarette would become "the latest one" they smoked. It seems that particular usage would only be in effect if a ...


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How does 'self-justifying' sound to you? Self-justifying (adj): Aiming to justify or excuse oneself or one's actions. Examples: The politicians' stories are self-justifying. The morally self-justifying claim of ‘hard work'. [Lexico]


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While, looking at this strictly, no tense can be assigned to any parts of speech other than verbs, and so the frequency adverb 'again' has no more a tense than it does sidewhiskers, broadened usages often occur and often become established, acceptable. From the internet I've collected several examples where 'is past tense' is used informally to mean 'is ...


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The use of "Make [noun] [adjective] Again" means that [noun] was once [adjective], and then was not , and the speaker wants it to be [adjective] in the future. There isn't, in the mere statement, any implication that the speaker wants to go "backwards". If you were talking about a company that was the biggest in the world, and you wanted ...


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There doesn't seem to be an English word describing the ability to tell truth from a lie. That is because English is an excellent language that realises that the ability to tell truth from a lie 100% of the time does not exist. As a consequence, any antonym for gullible, which does not mean "always accepts a lie as the truth" is not going to ...


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How about latent matches? This seems to fit your specification: the matches exist but are not yet activated. One definition of Latent is "present, but not yet active, developed, or obvious" Cambridge Dictionary.


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The definition in Macmillan is similar to the definition cited in the question: Macmillan belonging separately to each of two or more people or things previously mentioned Jane and Patrick chatted about their respective childhoods. To re-state StoneyB, the respective items ("childhoods"; "languages", in the sentence in question) must ...


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These are all adjectives, not nouns. In sentences such as: The worst is yet to come. The subject NP has a determiner the and a fused-modifier head, worst, which is a superlative adjective. It is not a noun. It does not “become” a noun. It remains an adjective. Consider how different it is from this sentence with an actual noun in the same slot: The ...


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Turnkey - adjective and nominalised noun https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turnkey Turnkey refers to something that is ready for immediate use, generally used in the sale or supply of goods or services."


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Is there a name for phrases like “faint of heart” or “fleet of foot”? No. It is simply a valid, although old-fashioned, poetic, or literary, construction. It is an adjectival phrase comprising and adjective and an adverbial phrase.


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In the first sentence "bad" is clearly the noun. In the second, as only the adjective can take comparative forms, "bad" must be the adjective, but that deduction is still rather intuitive. Anyway, the phrase "going from bad to worse" is known as a standard expression constructed with the adjective (Cambridge Dictionary).


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The verb to evict or any of its derivatives are inappropriate for the meaning that you intend. To evict is solely transitive and solely refers to persons being removed from a property. The past participle, as an adjective, always implies the passive: The evicted tenants = The tenants who have been evicted. OED: Evict (v.) 2. transitive. Sometimes with of, ...


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As you describe the problem, it is the entries that are to be evictable (or deletable), rather than the cache, which will still remain after the eviction of an entry. This means you have a choice: extend the meaning of evictable to apply to the container from which things are evicted; or retain evictable (deletable) for the things and find another word (...


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It is 'open to correction'. This phrase can be used in many other contexts (e.g. I'm open to ideas, I'm open to suggestions etc.). I haven't really ever heard the phrase 'I'm open with...' used before.


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Subject to others’ opinions, I feel your concluding version to be clear, unambiguous, grammatical and correct. Another way of achieving your aim might be ... and the mind, the latter being little more than a reductive account of the former or ... the mind, it being little more ...


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