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0

The trouble is that 'funny' can be used a noun. ('Red'is a better example: "She's a bloody red"). We carry a a lot of word history in our heads but students may not and could come across the word 'funny' as a noun before meeting it as a adjective. I think one has to describe word usage The very test is like the comparative test and the phrase 'more dead ...


5

An adjective is a lexical class of words. Since the lexicon (as usually, but not universally, assumed) is a finite set of words, there are only a finite number of adjectives. A noun modifier, on the other hand, is a syntactic constituent, which may be built up in a number of ways from other constituents, and there are an infinite number of possible noun ...


4

Grammatical terms are not always used consistently in different sources. In general, the term noun modifier is usually a broad term, often encompassing adjectives, nouns used to modify other nouns, verbs used as modifiers (usually past or present participles), and even phrases and clauses that modify a noun. Some examples: Adjective: I took the big tire ...


1

Noun modifiers is an overall category, which includes adjectives. Basically, they're any word that, well, modifies a noun in some way. Seems too obvious to be right, but sometimes things do go that way!


0

Choleric >> Choler Sanguine >> Sanguinity/Sanguineness Phlegmatic >> Phlegmaticness None of them is as cool as malancholia, but there you go.


3

My first thought after reading the title was "bespoke." But I think context matters and bespoke may not be the best word to use for your example. Bespoke connotes tailored clothes. The opposite of bespoke is "ready to wear." I've also seen bespoke used for other products beside clothes, but the usage seems to be about things hand made. You example context ...


3

tailored from tailor (v): make (clothes) to fit individual customers make or adapt for a particular purpose or person targeted is also fitting here


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There's also tailor-made: 1: made by a tailor or with a tailor's care and style 2: made or fitted especially to a particular use or purpose 3: factory made rather than hand-rolled (With the second definition) FYI - the Wikipedia page for "Bespoke" has some good info on "tailor-made" vs "bespoke"


1

Unconventional, Non-traditional, Fringe, Marginal, Radical, Specialized, ”Not your garden-variety”, Beyond the status quo or anti-consensus, Underground, Cult, Avante Garde Off the top of my head...


1

Merriam-Webster, Oxford, and Collins all indicate that “undeceived” is acceptable, but none of them appear to accept “ungullible”.


1

Useful 1 Able to be used for a practical purpose or in several ways. ‘aspirins are useful for headaches’ 1.1 British informal Very able or competent in a particular area. ‘He is a healthy sceptic to much paranormal activity, and would be a useful expert to have.’ Used in your original sentence: Your advice was so useful because it went far ...


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Specific (adj) 2a. restricted to a particular individual, situation, relation, or effect (adj) 3. free from ambiguity Which can be used in various ways, to show why you appreciated that advice: Thank you for giving me such specific advice. Meaning; thank you for giving me advice, that was directed at my individual situation, and for me personally. ...


1

I would use the word 'Original'


52

While lbf's answer is also good, I prefer bespoke: 1 a: CUSTOM-MADE // bespoke suit I would argue that bespoke has the connotation of being particularly fancy, which draws a nice contrast to boilerplate or cookie-cutter. I'm not sure if it's quite ideal for your situation, but here's how you could incorporate it: Your bespoke advice was so valuable ...


2

I'd probably use unconventional here. Cookie cutter means adhering to the norm. I don't know that I'd typically describe advice that way, but that's the term you requested a semantic opposite. I'd personally use the term conventional like in conventional wisdom. Thank you for your unconventional advice! It was much more helpful than the run-of-the-...


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As in: Your custom advice was valuable because it addressed my particular needs. made to the specifications of an individual customer This sense of custom can also describe something that is made just the way you want it.


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thoughtful advice : characterized by careful reasoned thinking e.g. a thoughtful essay definition 1b at Merriam-Webster or considered advice : matured by extended deliberative thought e.g. a considered opinion definition 1 at M-W Could also work: sagacious and insightful, but I more like "thoughtful" and "considered" to describe good or ...


0

Contemporary marries the two meanings, "modern" and "specific to a certain time". So when the reader sees it in a title of a textbook, they still understand it was modern at the time, but they will also invariably wonder what time that actually was and make sure to look at the publishing date.


0

As you adequately state it, the period can be considered both an uncountable chunk of time (as in the example you provide) or in relation to its individual units (hours, days). That's why I have less than 2 days/months/years. is correct. A similar use often occurs with money. The new model costs less than ten pounds. Regardless, we should also ...


1

It depends upon why he was avoiding the subject -- If he was sickened by the discussion: Squeamish : easily nauseated : QUEASY b : affected with nausea 2a : excessively fastidious or scrupulous in conduct or belief b : easily offended or disgusted Genteel if he was too polite to discuss such base matters. c: elegant or graceful in ...


-1

I would phrase this as follows: Patients who, at 6 months, showed persistently low values of peptide A (and normal peptide B) ... You can further qualify this: ... after initially presenting with low peptide A (and low or normal peptide B) at time zero. The parenthetical statements are optional if you feel it adds clarity to your statement. But, it ...


0

I'd suggest hydralike, which is an adjective form of 'hydra'. A Hydra, according to Greek mythology, is a many-headed beast that has a curious habit of growing two more heads every time you cut one off. (Heracles/Hercules had to defeat one in his second task.) It has taken on the meaning of: A complex, multifarious problem or situation that cannot be ...


-1

In terms of flagging a post several actions, or reactions, tend to be grouped together. In this example "rude or abusive". In this view "rude" can be an action that induces a reaction whereas "abusive" is a direct action with intent (or uses inappropriate words or statements). Examples: rude: "your post is dumb" abusive: "no one with a brain would post ...


1

Being "rude" is more of a passive action. If you walk by someone without greeting him or her, that would be rude. Being "abusive" is being active in causing offense. If you push or bump into someone (intentionally), that would be being abusive.


1

This is one of those words you imagine might exist but probably doesn't – and if it does, it will be too obscure to use or have a default meaning other than the one you want. However, according to Merriam-Webster equatable adjective: capable of being equated different but equatable terminologies — Ethel Albert and we surely need the appropriate ...


4

Aza on Literature, worth reading, predates other events; later wrote an update that's even more worth reading. Aza on Literature, worth reading, predates other events; later wrote an update that's worth reading even more. The original, (1) was fine as it was, even if some people might find it clunky. The edited version, (2) is positively damaging ...


3

Could the word have been dilettante? It doesn't necessarily imply several different media, but it means a person whose interest in (usually the arts) is only superficial.


1

Jack of all trades, master of none. "Jack of all trades, master of none" is a figure of speech used in reference to a person who has dabbled in many skills, rather than gaining expertise by focusing on one. . . . When abbreviated as simply "jack of all trades", it is an ambiguous statement; the user's intention is then dependent on context. However ...


0

The Elements of Style by William Strunk Jr. and E. B. White says, “Some words require a particular preposition in certain idiomatic uses. When such words are joined in a compound construction, all the appropriate prepositions must be included …” (p. 44 in the 2000 illustrated edition). It gives an example, “His speech was marked by disagreement and scorn for ...


1

From the clarification of the question, the problem is to describe a group of patients typified by those satisfy columns 1, 3, and 4 in the first table below ------------------------------ Start 6 months A B A B ------------------------------ low normal low normal low low low normal --------------...


-1

The first one is correct: The ruling class is incapable more than unwilling to pursue the public interest. You could, however, flip ‘more’ and ‘incapable’, to make the sentence clearer and highlight the contrast between ‘incapable’ and ‘unwilling’ thus: The ruling class is more incapable than unwilling to pursue the public interest. The second is ...


1

high-energy works as a compound modifier (adjective). Hyphens are used to construct the compound modifiers. high-energetic is incorrect. highly energetic works without hyphen.


-1

Using "high-energy" is alright but it would be better if you specify the amount of energy and avoid using subjective terms like "high" in a scientific paper.


-1

1 is better judging it based only on those 3 examples.


-1

a small sliver of moon rock I think the above is a noun phrase and small is an adjective qualifying sliver of moon rock..


1

I think the word you're looking for is contradictory. Lexico has the following relevant definition: 1.1 Containing elements which are inconsistent. ‘politically he exhibited contradictory behaviour’ So your friend could say: I had contradictory impressions of the movie. I liked the actors, but hated the plotline.


-1

I believe the problem you’re having is due to the fact that because your first sentence is so linguistically incorrect, the second sentence—regardless of how you word it—is also going to be incorrect. Assuming your first sentence is just the second part of a whole sentence (it would’ve been better if you had written the whole sentence in order to have the ...


2

Very is only an adjective when it modifies a noun, as in "Those were my very words" or "Let's start from the very beginning." In all other cases, it is an adverb.


0

I think that if you have to make up a word to create a sentence, then the chances are you need to be more succinct. When writers and editors come across these problems, the first step is always to think about how to flip the sentence – what are we really trying to say? Of course, we don't have the full context of what you were trying to express here, but I ...


1

nascent TFD adj. starting to grow or develop; being born As in: Los Angeles Times 2019 “He did this for many artists. It was his gift; a rare gift. He spotted and nurtured nascent talent and brought to their work a layered intelligence rooted in acute observation.” nascent describes the birth or beginning of something, like a new experience, a ...


0

Your character is stoic: not affected by or showing passion or feeling. especially : firmly restraining response to pain or distress —MW For example: Study could explain why some people are more stoic than others, researchers say It's been a mystery why some people can withstand pain better than others. —Genes May Help Determine Your Pain ...


0

I made a call to my friend I got or received a call from my friend These are idiomatic I had a call with my my friend is possible I had a talk with my friend is idiomatic


1

If you want to express that you experienced a phone conversation with somebody, yes, it is correct to say "I had a call with..." in the same way you could say "I had a chat with..." when you don't want to specify how or if you met face to face for a few drinks "I had some drinks with..." That happens because the construction actually comes from the verb to ...


0

Here, Adjective. Grammatically the function of 'got' in the sentence/phrase "got married" is Past participle. But we know past participle/any kind of participle functions as 'Adjective'. 'Get' sometimes can be used as Disguised form of 'To Be'. For xmple: He was married/He got married. Here, 'got'=was. Anyway,in such kind of use of 'get' in past ...


2

One fairly common way to say this is more narrowly scoped (an adjectival phrase). scope 1 noun ... The extent of a given activity or subject that is involved, treated, or relevant: the scope of the debate ... Synonyms ... range [AHD] (the senses of the verb and participial adjective follow). narrow: adjective ... Limited in area ...


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