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1 vote

The differences between the word "contradictory" and "ambivalent"?

"ambivalent" refers to one person not being able to choose from among several options, which may be opposite each other. "contradictory" doesn't refer to a single person. It refers ...
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What is the meaning of "pale and cold"? noun or adjective?

What is the meaning of "sharpened features"? The impression of a face that's angular and bony because of disease. why is "eye" a single form ? Because it can be, in poetic ...
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The differences between the word "contradictory" and "ambivalent"?

There is a clue to difference in your chosen definitions. For ambivalent you quote “usually opposing”. Collins has: Collins ambivalent If you say that someone is ambivalent about something, they seem ...
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Is this the correct usage of the word "fraught"?

The synonym substitution test will ferret out spurious uses of "fraught." If you can substitute the words "filled" or "loaded" for "fraught" with no change in ...
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-1 votes

Can "due" meaning "owed" be used without "to" in AmE? e.g. "the recognition which was due her"

You are assuming that 'due' here follows a definition that is synonymous with 'owed'. ...tries to salvage the dignity owed (to) the situation... Which is why the lack of 'to' seems a bit jarring to ...
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Can "due" meaning "owed" be used without "to" in AmE? e.g. "the recognition which was due her"

In American English, may we use "due" without the "to"? Yes (I speak US English), but not in the sentence you're proofreading: ...tries to salvage the dignity due the situation ...
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What is the hypernym for "next" and "previous"?

I just want to add my 2 cents even if it is so much later. The umbrella word would be "Navigation", but... TR:DR - Use "Neighbors" if you only peek at data, use "PrevNext&...
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12 votes

Can "due" meaning "owed" be used without "to" in AmE? e.g. "the recognition which was due her"

I am also British, but to me the original phrase sounds correct and has a different meaning to what you are trying to correct it to. "...tries to salvage the dignity due the situation" ...
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2 votes
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One-syllable word/adjective for 'receives little attention'

In addition to the past-tense-used-as-adjectives from the verbs in dubious's answer, there's also "shunned". But all of these carry emotional baggage. If there was no particular reason for ...
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One-syllable word/adjective for 'receives little attention'

The following verbs, although not exact matches, are single-syllable (but not when put in your sentence): shirk skip skimp spurn scorn
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What's an eponymous adjective that is an antonym of Machiavellian?

Lincolnian Abraham Lincoln was a moral and virtous leader, but also a strategic and cunning commander in chief. He assembled a “team of rivals”, which indicates a willingness to entertain opposing ...
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32 votes

Can "due" meaning "owed" be used without "to" in AmE? e.g. "the recognition which was due her"

As a native speaker of AmE, I find that the recognition due her sounds fairly standard to me (leaving aside the spoken similarity with do her). The alternative ...due to her does seem clearer, and it'...
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0 votes

How would you describe the lava in a lava lamp?

In a lava lamp, the floating luminous waxy substance is called a blob. (Another similar word is a glob, a colloquial word derived from globule). Blob can also be used as a verb and blobbing can be ...
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-1 votes

Is there an adjective for "opportunistic" that lacks its connotation of amorality?

To Capitalize on opportunities . take the chance to gain advantage from.
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Seeking a word with specific connotations of excessive, unashamed hypocrisy

shameless and undisguised; barefaced. BALD-FACED
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What is the best adjective to describe when a flag is flying perpendicularly like in this image?

UNFURLED make or become spread out from a rolled or folded state, especially in order to be open to the wind.
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1 vote
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Time series: hyphenated or not?

The point of punctuation is to help more easily readers grasp the intended relationships between or among words or groups of words on a page. If a particular punctuation mark doesn't promote that goal,...
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Time series: hyphenated or not?

The use of hyphens has considerably decreased over the last century or so, and many style guides now deprecate their use. When I wrote support publications for UK military equipment in the 1980s, we ...
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0 votes

Time series: hyphenated or not?

In a comment, John Lawler wrote: The rule is that modifiers of more than one word go after the noun they modify, but only one-word modifiers may precede the noun. The hyphen is to make one word ...
1 vote

Word for sadness at something ending, but excited about new

I have to admit I cheated on this question. I thought I had a word in my vocabulary to describe the emotion or state of mind you mentioned, and it eluded me simply because I couldn't jog my memory. ...
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-2 votes

What is the best adjective to describe when a flag is flying perpendicularly like in this image?

The only term that comes to mind is "Full Mast" but that doesn't describe the way it's flowing in the wind - that describes the height at which it is in relation to the pole. I suppose you ...
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1 vote

Time series: hyphenated or not?

The most common use of noun phrases is to function as subjects, objects, etc. Therefore, when "time series" is used that way, it seems natural and no hyphen is needed. Using a noun phrase as ...
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0 votes

What adjective (other than "last") means "most-recent previous"?

I think you can say "one version prior to the current one" or "the version preceding the current one".
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0 votes

What's the difference between cunning, crafty and wily?

Cunningness based on acquiring circumstantial favour by means of deceit even creating harms to others. Intelligence is based on genuine methods applicable to attain the goal. Clever is he who creat a ...
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0 votes

An informal term used for someone who has an affinity for American culture?

"Americanized", "enculturated", or "assimilated" all convey the meaning although perhaps not "informally". Very informally (as a colloquialism), "he" ...
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2 votes

Is there a word or phrase to define several words linked by hyphens, such as in "a sit-back-and-wait-for-it attitude"

Going with Lambie's suggestion that the asker intended to find a name for 'whole sentences' used as a modifier in a noun phrase, this phenomenon should be pretty straight forward to categorize. First, ...
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0 votes

When can I use "with" + object + adjective (example: "with him dead")?

with + person or pronoun or object + past participle or adjective or noun is an idiomatic usage. Merriam Weber says this: c—used as a function word to indicate a result attendant on a specified action ...
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2 votes

Does it make sense to use 'untenable' in this context?'

Untenable is usually used of an opinion or point of view rather than an inappropriate emotion. You might use out of the question, or look up its synonyms.
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Does it make sense to use 'untenable' in this context?'

I'm writing about a character who is facing an arranged marriage. Does it make sense to say that, in a situation such as this, developing feelings for someone else is 'untenable'? Are there any other ...
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-1 votes

Is "willfully disingenuous" a tautologism?

I think the actual tautology lies with the actual word, "disingenuous". I may well be displaying my etymological ignorance here, but surely: – "Genuine" – opposite of "genuous&...
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1 vote
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Ambiguity between present participle, ing-adjectives, and gerund

In a comment, John Lawler wrote: Like Schrödinger's cat, the -ing word in the example sentence is in an unknown state, since the sentence doesn't have sufficient context to distinguish between the ...

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