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[Technology1]'s foundational idea foundational (adj.) Of or relating to the basis or groundwork on which something rests or is built; needing to be understood or established at the beginning: We believe that fostering a strong local community is a foundational component of our inner-city scholarship program, guiding everything else we do. dictionary.com ...


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Rube Goldberg / Rube Goldberg-esque / Rube Goldbergian Rube Goldberg (adj.) Ingeniously or unnecessarily complicated in design or construction. A Rube Goldberg machine Oxford Languages Accomplishing by complex means what seemingly could be done simply A kind of Rube Goldberg contraption … with five hundred moving parts m-w Rube Goldberg Attributive. ...


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A comma should be placed between two adjectives (of equal rank) that describe the same noun. Adjectives “of equal rank” are adjectives that can exchange locations in the sentence with one another such that the sentence will still make sense. Adjectives which do not have equal rank do not require a comma. An example of adjectives of different rank: Several ...


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Both four-door car and four-doored car are correctly constructed according to English grammar rules. Which one is more idiomatic based on actual usage is a separate issue. The use of a phrase four-doored car does not necessarily imply the existence of a verb to door. English -ed has multiple functions. It can form the simple past tense of a verb, as in They ...


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For whatever it’s worth, the OED has four-door for the adjective. They provide this citation: 1957 P. Frank Seven Days to Never i. 13 A four-door sedan. So probably that’s what you should say unless you mean something else than is meant by the way their citation uses it. See below for such contrasting examples using other pairs than yours. What you ...


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If I describe a motor car as a 'four door car' I am making 'door' an adjective. No. Although it has an adjectival function. You are using "door" as an attributive noun that, itself, is modified by "four". four-door = noun phrase acting attributively. The hyphen is not necessary, but if you use it, use it consistently: In four-door ...


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How about contextualized? Definition* of contexture: 1: the act, process, or manner of weaving parts into a whole also : a structure so formed // a contexture of lies 2: CONTEXT Definition† of context: 1: the parts of a discourse that surround a word or passage and can throw light on its meaning 2: the interrelated conditions in which something exists or ...


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If something has lots of room for improvement then it has not yet reached its optimal point of development . You could say “and their low level of initial optimization” or “and their sub-optimal initial state.”


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I believe you example requires a noun rather than an adjective as you requested: The key advantages of synthetic organisms are lack of emotions, apathy, ruthless pragmatism, exponential learning and updatability. updatability The condition of being updatable Wiktionary updatable (adj.) That may be updated. OED update (v.) Make (something) more modern ...


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You could call these examples of a neologism, which is defined in the Oxford dictionary as "a newly coined word or phrase".


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Two ideas have to be combined in this adjective, the possibility of being improved and the easiness of any improvement; it is not likely that such a term exists. However a combination of words is possible. (vocabulary) meliorative adjective tending to ameliorate synonyms: ameliorating, ameliorative, amelioratory bettering changing for the better The key ...


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Lexico has a word that is applicable to people and to technology: adaptable ADJECTIVE 1 Able to adjust to new conditions. rats are highly adaptable to change 1.1 Able to be modified for a new use or purpose. telephone links that are adaptable for modems The example could be The key advantages of synthetic organisms are lack of emotions, apathy, ruthless ...


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Person-A checkmates Person-B. Consequently: Person-B is checkmated! Is 'checkmated' correctly used? Yes, but it is not an adjective it is the passive past participle of "to checkmate." OED: Chess (transitive). To give checkmate to: see checkmate n. 1. (Now, commonly, to mate; see mate v.2) 1856 R. Whately Bacon's Ess. (ed. 2) xxii. Annot. 215 ...


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This is a turn typical of newspaper and magazine articles. Here is another example from The Independent. He might angrily protest when Vincent (John Travolta) shows up with an unconscious Mia (Uma Thurman), who has snorted one line too many, but there's never any doubt of him helping his pal through his predicament. According to Wikepedia the use of ...


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This may look a little strange - and maybe it is by grammar rules - but it is absolutely normal in native English. Equally weirdly the definite article is just as acceptable and means exactly the same. If you don't want to write it like that there are plenty of alternatives. The one you gave, plus: Michael Jackson, unconscious, was rushed... Michael ...


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Auralize and auralization are in common use. There’s a Wikipedia entry at https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/auralize I recall this term being used at conferences like ACM Siggraph as the audio counterpart to visual rendering of data (which includes the animation data used in games and movies. Here’s an academic reference from 2002: https://www.cs.princeton....


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It's a noun. The root word is "studier", which is a person. All the rest are modifiers of this noun. It's basically turning the noun phrase studier who is enthusiastic, determined, and well-intentioned from 6pm until midnight into a compound word.


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If it does a noun's job, it's a noun for the day. The examples like "the rich" and "the poor" are nominalized adjectives. The hyphenated construct in the initial example is unquestionably the subject of the sentence ("The ___ is a person"). Yes, it's highly descriptive and includes many adjectives, but one could argue that the ...


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Neither Lexico nor Chambers confines the use of concurrent to only two simultaneous events or processes. Indeed the first example at Lexico is there are three concurrent art fairs around the city while Chambers defines the word to mean running, coming, acting or existing together or simultaneously. It's a mite redundant to include the word concurrent in ...


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A judicious person is someone who exercises sound judgement. This fits the OP's description of someone who trusts the trustworthy and distrusts the untrustworthy —in other words, merited trust. Judicious also seems to be a reasonable midpoint between naive and cynical. judicious (adj.) Having, exercising, or characterized by sound judgment m-w Having, ...


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Dung-dropping means pooping. For translation purposes, if mentioning pooping isn't culturally appropriate, then you could translate "dirty" or "contaminating" without loss of meaning.


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You're asking for specific input on "well" as an adjective. My feedback is that while you might find "weller" or "more well" in usage, and also the superlative "wellest" as well, I have personally never encountered this in conversation or regular usage, and you're better off using the other common expressions (e.g. he'...


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He's in the best shape of his life or some similar variation, such as he's in great shape. These idiomatic expressions are also used to refer to how physically fit someone is, which isn't strictly referring to one's health. One can appear physically fit from exercise, yet have a fatal disease. Wellness is complex. Shape the condition in which someone or ...


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The Lexico online dictionary from Oxford dictionaries provides the following definitions of the three words as applied to places: lively - (of a place or atmosphere) full of activity and excitement bustling - (of a place) full of activity. vibrant - Full of energy and life. So, when it comes to describing a place, all three words are very close synonyms ...


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