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As others have said in the comments, this sentence has the standard word order, so it is not anastrophic. The subject is indeed a lot, but there is an ellipsis of the of-part that normally follows. Here is the relevant discussion from CGEL (p. 349, the emphasis in boldface mine). Most relevant to you are the B examples in [56]: (a) Number-transparent ...


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From your comment that you're trying to directly solve the problem the sentence mentions, I'd connect the use of "solution" directly to the use of "problem".. One solution to unemployment problems is help from governments. One solution to the problem of unemployment, is help from governments. ..or if you want to connect "solve"...


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There are at least two explanations for the construct. Both depend on ellipsis. My suggestions for the omitted material are shown {so}. One solution to {the question of} solving unemployment problems is help from governments. One solution to {the} solving {of} unemployment problems is help from governments. Ellipsis = a situation in which words are left out ...


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The Be (auxiliary verb) used with the infinitive with to to express futurity, arrangement in advance, or obligation. in this case it conveys "not surprising and be foreseen" meaning. MisĀ­takes are likely to hapĀ­pen = Subject + be +adverb + to Verb likely is adverb that used for expressing emphasis You can also remove "likely" or use "...


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As pointed out in comments, (be) likely is a Raising predicate. That means that the noun phrase subject of be likely with a following infinitive complement is not really the subject of likely, but of the following infinitive clause. It's been "Raised" up from its position as infinitive subject to a role in the clause the infinitive is part of. ...


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