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3 votes

Why is "Up" in "Climb up + noun" a preposition and not an adverb?

They are prepositions because they behave as you would expect a preposition to - they take an optional complement in the form of an NP, do not inflect (up, *uply, *upping, etc.), and, under different ...
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3 votes
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Is the quantifier modifying the verb or the noun in this sentence "He gave a lot of advice"?

He gave [a lot of advice]. No: the non-count quantificational noun "lot" is not a modifier, but head of the NP "a lot of advice" functioning as direct object of "gave". ...
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2 votes

"As I told you" or "Like I told you"?

Close the door like I told you Denotes to a method While, Close the door as I told you Denotes to a circumstance. In the first one, a specific way of closing the door has been told and the speaker ...
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1 vote
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Difference between "duly admitted" and "graduated"

This conforms most closely to this definition from dictionary.com to permit to exercise a certain function or privilege: admitted to the bar. In this case, the graduate gets the privileges afforded ...
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1 vote

Use of “innit” in informal English English

Most dictionaries still record innit as an invariant tag (from isn't it), as you mention, but it is very true that its use is currently spreading, though it is still considered non-standard, and ...
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1 vote

Can an adverb be the subject in a sentence?

Adverbs do not function as subjects. Adverbs modify adjectives, verbs, other adverbs, phrases, clauses, or entire sentences. While adverbs can be placed at the start of a sentence, they still act on ...
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