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4

Satellites picked up something that nestled somewhere. There's nothing inherently wrong with the syntax of the example - it's just potentially ambiguous to pedants who might suppose it's the satellites that were nestling, rather than whatever they picked up. But that's a pointlessly perverse interpretation. Whether I say Hiding in the bushes I saw a fox or I ...


3

You can use ratio to refer to more than two items. But proportion or relationship are also possible. Proportions or parts are often used in recipes. Definition of ratio 1a : the indicated quotient of two mathematical expressions b : the relationship in quantity, amount, or size between two or more things : PROPORTION 2 : the expression of the relative ...


2

The English used by the King James version is mid-16th century English. It is Early Modern English in which it not was uncommon to use "to be" as the auxiliary to form the past tense of verbs of motion and of change of state - to perish is a verb of change of state: M't:12:43: When the unclean spirit is gone out of a man, he walketh through dry ...


2

Does is mean "Please pay attention not to harm the books when heating the book!" or "Take it easy! This operation won't harm the books!"? You are almost correct, it is not an imperative, it is a shortened form of It doesn't harm the books! (It = putting them in the oven at 165F).


2

There'd be nothing ungrammatical about the version with would meet, however it would change the sense of suggest from definition 1 below to 2 or 3. AHD To offer for consideration or action; propose: suggest things for children to do; suggested that we take a walk. To express or say indirectly: The police officer seemed to be suggesting that the death was ...


2

You are part of the overall percentage of graduates, more specifically the top 10%. As the graduates are seen as a collection of people, that you are within, it would be correct to refer to this as 'in' the top 10 percent.


1

The word 'as' in the latter statement seems to suggest that the top 10 percent of your class is something very distinct from the rest of your class. Consider the following statements- I graduated as a biologist. I graduated as a physicist. In general, I do not think that being in the top 10 percent of a class deserves this kind of distinction. However, the ...


1

Either is grammatical, according to the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Huddleston and Pullum 2002). The comparative determinatives more, less, fewer can occur after the head provided there is a determiner. Thus we have a post-head alternant for one more day but not for more days: compare [One day more]/*[Days more] will be needed. (Underlining ...


1

No, not really, although it could maybe depend on what you mean by "more fully supported by English grammar". Neither interpretation is ungrammatical at all in the model of English grammar that is standardly accepted by syntacticians. It's very clear that English grammar rules produces ambiguous output in many situations. Grammar rules are not ...


1

Your example (Change 100% of the requests to INO service) is grammatically correct and understandable if every request in the system is currently IVO. If not, I would recommend for clarity: Change 100% of the IVO requests to INO service. NOTE: "Change 100% of the requests for INO service" indicates that you want to make some change to all the ...


1

To "adopt" does not merely mean to use. In order to adopt, you must start using it. to take up and practice or use Emphasis mine. For instance, during the Neolithic, humans used both agriculture and fire, but they only adopted agriculture, since they had long used fire.


1

If you are British, the comma goes outside of the quotations (in this case). If you are American, the comma goes inside of the quotations (in every case). In British English, commas are only written inside quotations if they were in the original quote. Also, you place a comma at the end of a quote if you are quoting a whole sentence (this doesn't apply to ...


1

Then simply means the next thing that happened was... They could be quite routine things. "I got up, then had breakfast, then took the dog for a walk." We would use afterwards to refer to something that happened after a significant action or event. "I spent the afternoon working hard in my garden. Afterwards, I was too tired to do anything but ...


1

@Elliot in the comments is correct for "normal" usage, the preposition in is used with "mood", or you can use the adjective moody. However, recent slang does use "mood" without a preposition. The most common way might be attached to a picture, illustrating said mood, as explained by Daily dot and Slate. This can also take the ...


1

The use(s) of of with quantifiers The usual function of "a couple" can be described by the label of "quantifier". Other words that can act as quantifiers include numerals, more, and all. Many quantifiers cannot directly precede a definite noun phrase: we can't say "twenty the children" or "more the children". Since a ...


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