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5

That's not a relative (adjective) clause; it's a that-clause—a noun clause (warning: grammar terms vary). It functions as a noun does in its various roles: subject, object, complement, appositive, etc. This that is a conjunction, not a relative pronoun. See Merriam-Webster at that conjunction English and Language Usage's "resident" authority, linguist John ...


3

James once asked the cat, “Have you seen another person like me?” The cat crossed his legs and thought for a while, then replied, “I’ve scratched lots of trees, but I’ve never seen a boy like you.” The above would follow the rule you cited. No addition period is needed after the question mark closing the first quote. Additionally, it follows the rule ...


2

Technically, no, they are not required. However, as "pause commas" to aid reading, then they can be justified.


2

There is a general rule in English that bitransitive verbs like give, send, offer, promise, sell, lend, show, tell can have two different syntaxes. Either I gave the book to John or I gave John the book. Similarly I am going to tell some news to you or I am going to tell you some news. However, your chosen verb, "present" does not do ...


2

This starts with a finite clause, not a relative clause. Aarts, in English Syntax & Argumentation - 1997 2001, states: ...[What] are the particular forms that Subjects can assume? ... [T]hey are typically Noun Phrases .... However, Subjects can also be realised by other phrase types [ ... and clauses]. 5.2 Realisations of the Subject [5]...


1

How many siblings are in the picture? If the answer is "more than one" then you should use the plural form.


1

"Contents sold by weight not volume." has several words missing. This is not unusual on packaging and in places where there is not a lot of space. The full version is "The contents of this pack are sold [by the manufacturer] by weight not by volume." It is therefore a passive.


1

Yes. All modal verbs have two functions: one that modifies the "mode" of the verb and the other which expresses some possibility.


1

Do I understand correctly that the meaning of "only" for "not until" is only valid for past actions: No. You will only be able to put the roof on after you have built the walls. = You will not be able to put the roof on until you have built the walls.


1

The issue here is that the word "to" can be used in a couple of different ways. The usual way to form the infinitive of a verb is to put the particle "to" in front of it -- but that's not you want to do here (even though I just did it 3 times!). I want to design a poster. <-- not your situation A key unlocks a particular lock, and you can use "for" ...


1

Sleeping is not out of the question: Do not wake the sleeping. Sleeping is an example of—in traditional grammar terms—a nominalized adjective or an adjectival noun. It's an adjective—in this case a present participle adjective—functioning as a noun: . . . an adjective that has undergone nominalization, and is thus used as a noun. In the rich and the ...


1

[S [NP That [S a ruined structure found at Aqaba, Jordan, was probably a church]] [VP is indicated [PP [PP by its eastward orientation and overall plan], as well as [PP by the artifacts, such as glass oil-lamp fragments, found at the site.]]] ]


1

According to the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, the clause starting with That... is a content clause, where that is an obligatory expandable declarative subordinator (p. 952):: [That a ruined structure found at Aqaba, Jordan, was probably a church] is indicated... The bracketed elements: [That a ruined structure at Aqaba, Jordan, was probably ...


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