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6

Imitating some of the styles of Early Modern English is a good way of giving a fantasy feel to a piece of writing. You don't want imperative verbs – those are what you'd use to give command. In Early Modern English, you'd use the base form of the verb, as we do today. "Come!" "Halt!" "Get thee hence." There's no need for any "-eths" or "-ests". In Early ...


5

Big is an adjective. Much is not. You can say "he is big" but not "he is much". Enough modifies adjectives (or verbs). It's an adverb (or a determiner). So "he is big enough" or "he is rich enough" or "he has studied enough", but there must be a verb or an adjective for it to make sense. Much is also an adverb/determiner, just like enough. You can often ...


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Much is always used together with an uncountable noun. Many is always used with nouns that are countable. (Source) As Friend is countable, many would be used. (too many friends)


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What you are trying to say is that you have had experience of something else and that experience lasted for 5 years. You could just say: I have five years of experience working in... However, if you don't want to use "of" then you do need to use the possessive apostrophe as your spellchecker is showing you. Apparently though, it cannot determine the ...


2

You didn't ask a question. I think you mean to ask what one would call these "sides": they are faces. As per Wolfram MathWorld: Face the intersection of an n-dimensional polytope with a tangent hyperplane. It is common to refer to the front face, back face, left face, right face, top face, and bottom face of a cube.


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As others have said in the comments, the nouns in your first example are not quite related in the right way to justify omitting the articles: instead of kitchen, you need to have an item that, like the sink and the fridge, is typically found in a kitchen. I agree with you that the second example is marginally acceptable. It's only marginally acceptable ...


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(Edit: this was a response to a discussion in the Writing SE. I tackled the non-grammatical elements for that SE by addressing a modified version of the question to aid translation, "How should one approach creating formal speech for a fantasy novel in English?" It's clearly not as relevant in the English Language & Usage SE, but I'm not going to delete ...


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As far as I can tell from what Mitchell & Robinson say in A Guide to Old English, no. Verb forms in OE only have one voice - the active voice. The one exception is the word hātte (is called, was called). If someone wanted to indicate the passive voice in OE, using any other verb besides hātte, they'd either use man (one, one person, someone, anyone) ...


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The sentence fails in terms of both syntax and semantics. Syntactically, without knowing more about the meaning of the sentence than what is in the sentence, it needs to be changed to the following: ✔ What the Europeans refer to as the habit of dreaming (singular) by the Aborigines is (singular) not what the Aborigines themselves believe it (the habit of ...


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I think it's incorrect. It's not always simple to give a yes-no answer to the question "is there any grammatical error in this sentence". The correctness of pronoun usage often depends on the intended meaning: a pronoun might be grammatically correct with one meaning, but incorrect with another meaning. In that sentence, "them" seems to stand for "dreams", ...


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How the west was won is something that they still debate. What it was was not clear to me then, and wouldn't be for years to come. I can show you how to tie a tie. She had a tendency to promise that which should never be promised. There are some grammars which cannot separate out the grammatical relations of a word or phrase from its internal ...


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Would have instead of had in a unreal conditional/subjunctive is found in informal spoken American English and in printed or digital sources close to it. Did Albert Einstein really say he wished he would have “studied the Talmud?” — Quora question. In numerous talks with his wife, the subject of school kept coming up, and many times he found himself ...


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An apostrophe showing possession always goes after the thing that is doing the possessing. You might not think of a week as possessing time, but that is actually what it's saying - the amount of time that is contained within a week. It often helps to turn the phrase around in your head to make it clearer: The girl's toys: the toys belonging to the girl ...


1

Your usage of 'for' is acceptable as Kate commented. I'm sure the reason you are asking is because it sounds a little clunky. This is what I would do to simplify it. The umbrella section “socioeconomical understanding” was chosen to mediate the understanding of innovation in X industries. The following subsections are intertwined in their individual ...


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I almost completed Indicates an action in the past, which you were doing, and is all gone now. So you say "I almost completed the running race, but had to stop half-way through." I have almost completed Means something is still ongoing, and you expect to finish soon. "I have almost completed the race, there are only 500m to go." (The tense names give ...


1

right out of the box = immediately Authentic Journeys Possibly, for this first definition, we can expand the phrase to "out of the box feature" or "out of the box software." Basically, this means using the product straight off the shelf, or out of the store or manufacturer without making any changes. As in: Running an eight-minute mile right (...


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A phrasal verb such as break down (= stop working, e.g. a computer) can be used in the various past, present and future verb constructions because the action of stop working can take place in the past, present or future. It cannot be used in passive constructions because it is an intransitive verb and has no object. But when break down means hit something ...


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Normally stative predicates are supposed to be incompatible with the progressive form. E.g., The car is red, not *The car is being red. However, this is flouted in a special class of constructions generally referring to a person's behavior: You're being annoying, You're being dumb, etc., pointing out some temporary extreme of behavior. You're looking good ...


1

The difference is one of the perception in time and also immediate relevance to the reader. Use of the auxiliary verb 'have' indicates a time relationship relative to the present, implying that this could happen in the relatively near future. This is called use of aspect in grammar. It could also be understood to indicate greater relevance to the reader. In ...


1

Yes, "inherent" modifies "problems" in your example. The usual grammatical treatment begins with a relative clause modifying a preceding noun: "the many problems which are inherent in the setup" -> "the many problems inherent in the setup" (by WHIZ, a rule that deletes "which is/are") -> "the inherent problems" (if "in the setup" is not present, the ...


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