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4

The original sentence and all the possible "corrections" are wrong. My friend Neha anxiously watched her cat who, having given birth to six kittens, was exhausted. Or, more simply: My friend Neha anxiously watched her cat who was exhausted after giving birth to six kittens.


3

I think it should be - He, like me, is a doctor.


2

It seems that a child could be adopted by more than two adults, although it would be very rare and would have to reflect very special circumstances. So strictly speaking, both in the phrase "both my parents" is not necessarily pleonastic. Even in the more standard two-parent situation, this might be done for the sake of emphasis or because of ...


2

This sentence is not standard. It becomes standard if you suppress "that". What she likes I like. If you try to restore the normal order, there is no place for "that". This is an indication that the construction is most probably not correct. This is a case of fronting the object (emphatic sentences); so, there is no difference with the ...


2

[1] It's important [that this is done]. [2] I'm sure [that this will be done]. The lexical class of the bracketed elements is 'declarative content clause'. In [2] The subordinate clauses combines with the adjective it complements to form a larger adjective phrases functioning as predicative complement of "be". By contrast, in [1] (an extraposed ...


1

There is quite a large overlap between the uses of these three phrases (or if you're happy with Venn diagram terminology there is a large intersection between the sets of their uses). However there are shades of meaning that are unique to each one. "Couldn't have gone" is unique in that it can refer to something having been impossible in the past ...


1

"this is supposably wrong" means (at least to my ear) "it is just barely possible that this is wrong", whereas "this is supposedly wrong" or "this is supposed to wrong" means that "it is generally thought that this is wrong". A complication with supposedly is that it sometimes is used to mean "as ...


1

"Metaphor" here appears to be used as a metonymy, where the ship itself is not a metaphor, but used as a shorthand for all the metaphorical usages of it and its situation to represent globalisation's and efficiency's flaws.


1

The sentence is correct and grammatical. It is also ambiguous, because it is unclear whether the structure "standing by the road" is qualifying "she" or "the boys" (although its position suggests the latter). But there is nothing wrong about the sentence's grammar per se.


1

The verbal construction you are using is "would like sth to + inf without to". I would like my skirt to be shorter. I would like the car to go fast. I would like the cake to have a cherry on top. I would like it to have worked for me too, but it didn't. You can see that in the four sentences above a conjugated form would not do. So, you must ...


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