25 votes

Can "due" meaning "owed" be used without "to" in AmE? e.g. "the recognition which was due her"

As a native speaker of AmE, I find that the recognition due her sounds fairly standard to me (leaving aside the spoken similarity with do her). The alternative ...due to her does seem clearer, and it'...
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7 votes

Can "due" meaning "owed" be used without "to" in AmE? e.g. "the recognition which was due her"

I am also British, but to me the original phrase sounds correct and has a different meaning to what you are trying to correct it to. "...tries to salvage the dignity due the situation" ...
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  • 71
2 votes

One-syllable word/adjective for 'receives little attention'

In addition to the past-tense-used-as-adjectives from the verbs in dubious's answer, there's also "shunned". But all of these carry emotional baggage. If there was no particular reason for ...
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2 votes

Is there a word or phrase to define several words linked by hyphens, such as in "a sit-back-and-wait-for-it attitude"

Going with Lambie's suggestion that the asker intended to find a name for 'whole sentences' used as a modifier in a noun phrase, this phenomenon should be pretty straight forward to categorize. First, ...
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  • 6,132
2 votes

Is it correct to place the adjective before 'is/was'?

Yes, it's just fine. This device strengthens the writing when used judiciously. Literary you may call it,* but it is not unusual in English in any way. Here’s the longer explanation, with references ...
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  • 127k
2 votes

Does it make sense to use 'untenable' in this context?'

Untenable is usually used of an opinion or point of view rather than an inappropriate emotion. You might use out of the question, or look up its synonyms.
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  • 17.8k
1 vote
Accepted

Time series: hyphenated or not?

The point of punctuation is to help more easily readers grasp the intended relationships between or among words or groups of words on a page. If a particular punctuation mark doesn't promote that goal,...
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  • 151k
1 vote

Time series: hyphenated or not?

The most common use of noun phrases is to function as subjects, objects, etc. Therefore, when "time series" is used that way, it seems natural and no hyphen is needed. Using a noun phrase as ...
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1 vote
Accepted

Ambiguity between present participle, ing-adjectives, and gerund

In a comment, John Lawler wrote: Like Schrödinger's cat, the -ing word in the example sentence is in an unknown state, since the sentence doesn't have sufficient context to distinguish between the ...
1 vote
Accepted

Specialized or Specialist

No you are not correct. Doctors at the cited hospital practice various distinct specialties, instead of being merely "hospitalists" or "general/family practitioners". Were they to ...
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1 vote

Is it correct to place the adjective before 'is/was'?

The former sentence, "Shut were his blinds" is grammatically correct. The difference in meaning lies in emphasis: Shut were his blinds puts more emphasis on shut, while His blinds were shut ...
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1 vote
Accepted

Antonym of operational in the sense of larger scope, and non-recurrence but not military

Organizational: From Collins Dictionary: ADJECTIVE [ADJ n] Organizational abilities and methods relate to the way that work, activities, or events are planned and arranged. Evelyn's excellent ...
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  • 329
1 vote

Word for sadness at something ending, but excited about new

I have to admit I cheated on this question. I thought I had a word in my vocabulary to describe the emotion or state of mind you mentioned, and it eluded me simply because I couldn't jog my memory. ...
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