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Because your subordinate clause following which is here an “optional” non-restrictive clause rather the type of “required” restrictive clause which I have just now used here, the orthographic convention in standard written English is to always use a comma. This is quite different from the standard orthographic conventions of written German. In German, you’...


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I think a dash or a colon is required. A comma is not strong enough as the clauses are quite separate. I would not wait**:** I would find the problem and fix it I would not wait - I would find the problem and fix it


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If you are treating your email signature as something that will more-or-less be fully or partially cut/pasted for your surface-mail address, you should format your address in the signature the way your national postal authority recommends. As you have used an address in the United Kingdom as an example, I conclude that you are in the UK, and thus that the ...


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As a Russian-speaker, these two usages remind me of the Russian phrases "Знаешь, а..." and "Знаешь что?". However, I feel like their usage varies with the language. In English, you can only use "you know what?" as a question, typically to show that you've come to some conclusion, made a decision or simply agree with someone (e.g. "You know what? That's not ...


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It is necessary, but not because it separates an enumerated list, rather it marks off a parenthetical insertion. The phrase "but also expert engineers" is inserted and needs to be set off with commas (or dashes): Due to X, it is difficult for researchers, lecturers and students to apply Y. Due to X, it is difficult for researchers, lecturers and ...


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Generally, we don't include a comma before the and if we're combining two parts of a single clause. For example, you wouldn't use a comma in a sentence like (a) "I like bread and butter" or (b) "I like bread and dislike butter." Your sentence is like (b) in that you've got a Subject ("the cost for the new service") and a Verb Phrase ("is...") and then you ...


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