4

Pry in the sense of "ask for information" is almost always negative in connotation. Pry in the sense of "use a stick or bar to open something" is neutral in connotation, and is a shortening of prise/prize. (This usage of pry is a verb, so one can't say "be pry" in the way one can say "be curious".)


4

For informal speech, this phrase is okay. For formal speech, or for something written, such as a persuasive letter or a term paper, it would be better to avoid combining "mind" and "mindset" in close proximity. The awkwardness would be kind of like writing, "Next, set the new combination on the combination lock." Oxford's definition of mindset: The ...


3

Perhaps debate suits your purpose: it's shorter and has less syllables than skepticism while meaning the same in a less negative manner (debates can be and usually are healthy). "There was still much debate, but it had to be done." or perhaps "It was the subject of much debate, but had to be done." Macmillan: debate NOUN 1 [...


3

What about simply open? I would have to slightly change your sample sentence: Much was still open, but it had to be done.


3

It might possibly be slog away (at)


2

I'm thinking "not to jibe" comes from sailing language, meaning "it (your argument) doesn't make headway very well against a headwind (of opposing argument): A jibe (US) or gybe (Britain) is a sailing maneuver whereby a sailing vessel reaching downwind turns its stern through the wind, such that the wind direction changes from one side of the boat to the ...


2

The term 'goldbrick' is still in use. Usage goes back about 150 years, primarily in the U.S. Originally it referred to an actual 'brick', made to appear precious, but mostly useless. It can be used as a noun, verb, adjective. Over the years, the meaning has expanded. In regards to a person, it refers to a worker who makes the appearance of being useful, ...


2

Annexure is a common Indian-English word describing supplement or appendix to a document. (usually: legal, taxation, proposals, technical reports etc.) You may want to use annexure when you are referring to the detailed part of the document. "For detailed 5-yr tax assessment worksheet, please refer to Annexure..." Oxford Dictionary: annexure PS// One can ...


2

"He has his mind in the right mindset" is not grammatically wrong but it is an awkward sentence. Either "He is in his right mind" or "He has the right mindset" would work. Putting the two together creates an awkward sentence. in (one's) right mind Thinking soundly; rational. Usually used to set up a context in which any sane person would or could do, ...


2

I don't think there is one word that encompasses both attitudes. Patriotism may lead nationals to frown upon external criticism and, indirectly, to their feeling that they are the only ones empowered or entitled (as @tk421 cleverly suggested) to speak as they wish about their domestic affairs. This issue reminds me of a famous, long poem from my country, "...


1

Slog https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/slog_1 e.g. I had been slogging away at the computer all day without success.


1

"just" has several meanings. One of them is "recently", but when combined with other adverbials of time "just" can mean -- as I think is the case here -- "only". Imagine this conversation: A: Tell me more about your neighbor. B: Well, I don't know him very well. Actually, I just got to know him last year. (= I got to know him only last year.)


1

How about "much questioning"? (You used "willing to question" among the characteristics you seek)


1

Confirmation is still needed. Or I'm reserving judgment for now.


1

This phrase is using "wrestling" in a metaphorical sense. This sense of wrestling is a pretty common usage of the word. See this source with definitions I have copied below. Literally, to grapple with someone or an animal in an attempt to subdue and immobilize or just as part of aggressive play. The kids have been out there wrestling ...


1

"outwardly" or "On the outside" might fit in here. In the sentence you provide an adverb/adverbial phrase would be more fitting than an adjective. Definition of outwardly 1a : on the outside : EXTERNALLY 1b : toward the outside 2 : in outward state, behavior, or appearance was outwardly friendly


1

In American English (and British English so far as I know) the idiom is "You're welcome" you're welcome idiom used as a response after being thanked by someone Merriam-Webster Dictionary Saying "You're welcomed" sounds strange and only makes sense if you're describing the actual process of being welcomed to someone in the second person, for ...


1

Sven is basically right. The feature is a matter of style rather than grammar. It is associated with comparison of the forms:- X visits her doctor more often than does Y. X runs as fast as does Y. The general norm is that noun subjects come before their verbs except in a question (or a second person imperative. The exception can also occur in some ...


1

to pry Macmillan Dictionary [intransitive] to be interested in someone’s personal life in a way that is annoying or offensive As in: I just glanced at the letter; I didn’t mean to pry. The press continues to pry into their affairs. Depending on the context, to pry is meaning to be intrusive and or offensive, though the phrase prying eyes ...


1

I think your first impression was right. As GDoS notes, shuck is used, especially in campus, as an euphemism for suck. (US campus) a euph. for suck v.  Eble Campus Sl. Nov. 3: shucks – a euphemism for sucks: N.C. State shucks!


1

But was there a yesteryear equivalent of “shipping”? A word or phrase before the 1990s that meant you wanted two people to become romantically involved with one another? I suspect not, and have found no evidence of one. Most probably – IMHO – because the need for such a term (or, at least, the desire to make a contraction from relationship/worship) ...


1

Your question relates to appropriate agreement in figures of speech, specifically in a telecommunications signal or telecommunications connection. Here are some examples of possible word constructions, based on the words you provided: a caller on the line lose a call/caller lose a connection/signal line/connection/signal is not stable ...


1

This requires the use of metaphor, but would generally be understood in context. The image is of a passenger fussing, unsolicited, about a driver's speed, chosen route, follow distance, etc. backseat driver noun [ C ] US /ˈbækˌsit ˈdrɑɪ·vər/ a person who gives unwanted advice or criticism, esp. to the driver of a car


1

"Get" also means to go and "fetch" something then bring it back to where you currently are. You left your book in your locker? Go get it. "Take your book" would be to grab it and go elsewhere, like from home to school.


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