31

In my estimation, it all amounts to nothing more than an emotionally-driven burst of anger and frustration. Nothing worth parsing word-for-word. [“Fredo“] is like the n-word for us. That's a gross exaggeration. The n-word is used to dehumanize, ridicule and oppress black people. "Fredo" just means the dumb brother. Cuomo is also being a bit hypocritical ...


27

I don't think it's "Fredo" specifically that's the insult. Calling someone by a name that's stereotypically associated with their ethnicity is likely to be viewed as racism. So he would have a similar problem if he called him "Luigi" ("Mario" might work for others, but not him, because that's his father's and son's actual names), called an Arab "Muhammed", ...


5

Trump was re-tweeting a late-night comic who is allowed to be funny. In The Godfather (1972) John Cazale plays the brother Fredo. He eventually takes issue with the way he is treated as the less intelligent gopher, worker bee, by everyone in the organization. The name has taken on this role in popular culture. The man using "Fredo" as the name professed ...


5

This isn't quite right as you are countermanding the command(order), not the person. He commanded you to go to hills. But I countermand that order to go to the hills [and command you to stay here]


4

Today it's common practice to google someone's name in order to do a little background check, or to discover why a certain person is a celebrity or in the news. In 2007, the expression “Googling" was still in its infancy, and although Marge Simpson's character is often portrayed as a naive warm-hearted housewife and devoted mother, she probably guessed, ...


4

It's just uncommon. Uncommon enough to be confusing, and so worth avoiding. The word would be "live" in US English, Canadian English and English English, but not Scottish English which also uses "stay" (which is why I said English English before). Where "live" is used for long term residence, "stay" normally implies a short term visit. If you ask a visitor ...


3

To answer the specific questions asked in the post body. When did calling someone “Fredo” become an insult? Is it considered racist in the US? The origin of the insult is apparently Fredo Corleone, the weaker and less-intelligent of two sons in the Italian mob family from The Godfather. It's not a very commonly known insult, but seems to be more-commonly ...


2

According to merriam-webster nonwork is an actual word, wih the exact meaning you just defined. The only differnce is, that it is written together, without the "-" symbol. As for the phrasing of it, for me something like: "Work related only." or "Work related only please." sounds a bit better. I think, anyone using Skype for business would understand that by ...


2

I don't think such a merger is common in general Even though /æ/ and /ɛ/ tend to have similar realizations, I haven't read of a general merger between the vowels of bend and band being common in any natively spoken variety of English. My understanding is that /æ/ generally has a longer duration than /ɛ/, and I think that this applies also to the raised ...


2

It's hard to test systematically for early instances of "they" as third-person singular pronoun because such instances often follows on a contingent phrase that is highly specific and variable from one instance to the next. For example: If a person [performs action X], they will [get result Y]. However, I decided to check Google Books results for several ...


2

The OED calls that usage of go colloquial. It's a logical extension of the more correct usage of "go" defined as "produced sound" (i.e. "the firecracker went 'bang'"). This usage goes all the way back to the 16th century. It's interesting to note that the earlier examples it gives refer to people making vocalizations that are not entirely words, i.e. "‘Yo-...


2

You could call them remittances: remittance noun [ C ] an amount of money that you send to someone: She sends a small remittance home to her parents each month. ​ [ U ] the act of sending payment to someone: remittance advice/information Cambridge Dictionary


1

Grammarphobia suggests that possibly two indipendent similar expressions developed in BrE and AmE: The Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang and the Oxford English Dictionary cite this quotation from the New York World in 1888 as the earliest printed example: “Dis is only a bluff dey’re makin’ – see! Dey’re talkin’ tru deir hats.” But ...


1

I would use "Do you mind going Dutch?" (wikipedia) which in this case means to split the bill.


1

It is correct to use ‘the ill’ as in ‘I'm going to be a doctor. I'm going to help the ill‘ - but use of ‘the ill’ has declined in popularity, in comparison to ‘the sick’, which is why it sounds odd or unfamiliar. ‘Ill’ has another meaning, which is ‘evil or bad’ as in ‘ill will’. Or ‘he thought ill of her’ (meaning, he thought badly of her’) which now ...


1

Build it in steps with this example: Alice likes apples. Bob likes apples. Alice and Bob like apples. Both Alice and Bob like apples. I hope it is now clear why the sentence should read Both 'right-click' and 'double-click' accept 2 parameters.


1

Patriotic having or expressing devotion to and vigorous support for one's country. Source: Lexico An individual would be a patriot.


1

"Though" is an interchangeable conjunction with "even though" and "although", and even though it sounds weird to some, the first usage (1.) is correct, while the usage with the semi-colon is debatable. Examples 3 and 4 are both correct. In 3, you have the appositive set off by commas, either because of a pause or because of its lack of restrictiveness, or ...


1

So far you have not indicated your gender, and that may have a bearing on it. edit: It has just been pointed out to me by Shoover that gender was noted in a self-comment. I have not been back “home” in over 30 years, but when I lived there I was not aware of any hidden meaning to a “slice”: a slice was a piece of pizza, and given that you were seated at ...


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