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5

No. The verb "to determine" has two (relevant) meanings that are quite different. Because of a quirk of phrasing, it is exactly the words "have sold" versus "sell" that let us know which sense is meant here. So no, you can't swap them without changing the meaning. Sense 1: "To ascertain definitely" (Loosely, this sense is about figuring out what happened ...


5

The sentence means that it is not normal behaviour for someone to be doing. Of course, you have to know what the normal behaviour for that person is from experience to be able to say it. Gramatically, it seems okay to me. It's in subject-verb form. "Crying" is the subject, "is" ("to be"; present tense, 3rd person singular) is the verb, "like you" is the ...


5

It means that crying is not something normal and expected of you. The speaker would not expect you to cry. Consider that these are all equivalent: Crying is not like you.(-ing clause as subject) To cry is not like you.(infinitive clause as subject) It is not like you to cry.(extraposition of infinitive clause with dummy it as grammatical subject) It ...


4

The entire phrase is a nonsensical piece of wordplay "The lame walk and the blind see" is a well know biblical phrase, said by Jesus to indicate his holiness. The phrase is corrupted here into nonsense, in keeping with the nonsense religious position he claims immediately before it, and the nonsense powers he claims after it. "The lame talk" makes no sense ...


3

The bubble doesn't so much burst as evaporate means that the bubble didn't burst (with any sound) it just quietly disappears. so much [verb 1 ] as [verb 2] in general means that the action is more like [verb 2] than [verb 1]. so much as without the verbs has a different meaning, and even can be a definition in this case. Collins English Dictionary has this ...


3

There is an idiom in the question. Here are some more examples I have spontaneously generated to demonstrate the pattern. Crying is not like you. Complaining is not like you. Playing tennis is not like you. Whining is not like you. Throwing out leftovers is not like you. To not be like someone preceded by an activity using a gerund noun or ...


3

I suggest you look up Oxford Dictionaries or something like that. The pieces you cite are clearly legal papers: so you might also try googling "legal meaning of Re" or something like that. In fact, Dictionary.com has a fair definition of the word. ...Re2 preposition Chiefly Law and Commerce. in the case of; with reference to; in re. ORIGIN OF ...


3

First, for the purposes of following this article, it is sufficient to understand that Re D is the name of a court case, and thus of the judicial opinion rendered in it; it is not necessary to know why the case has that name. It is quite normal to refer to legal cases by their names, without giving any thought to why they are so called. This is because what ...


2

As The Photon suggests, this is almost certainly a reference to the character 'Colonel Blimp' invented by the cartoonist David Low. He was a pompous elderly army officer who expressed old-fashioned ideas in a bombastic manner. The author's father, being a naval officer, was given the nickname with a navy rank substituted.


2

'In re' means 'in the matter [of]'. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_re. And 're' thus means 'the matter [of]'. I would guess that D is the first letter of the child's or juvenile's last name (or of somebody whose identity needs protection for other reasons).


2

How did it evolve? I suspect the word has always carried the implication of "slander" - the word "smear" naturally lends itself to meaning "apply muck to (a previously clean thing)" as opposed to "reveal as (already) mucky". Similar words like "sully", "soil", or "blacken" also carry the figurative connotation, in relation to a reputation, that the damage ...


2

The difference, using the words from your research, is between ruling in place of (i.e. instead of) the monarch (regent) and ruling as a representative of the monarch for part of their land (viceroy). Let's take the UK and India as an example. They're both countries, they have the same monarch, who resides in the UK. If the monarch rules in the UK, and ...


2

I found this paragraph in an article while researching family history. After 1000 A.D., border life was in turmoil. In 1246, 6 Chiefs from the Scottish side and 6 from the English side met at Carlisle and produced a set of laws governing all the border Clans. These were unlike any laws prevailing in England or Scotland or, for that matter, anywhere else ...


2

UK/US usage It would appear from dictionaries that both these expressions are regarded as (mainly) British (which may explain the lack of response to the question, assuming most list members are from the US — I am British and was unaware of this). The evidence for this is entries in The Oxford Dictionary for tight and mean, the Cambridge Dictionary for mean,...


2

Agreeing with and adding to Janus Bahs Jacquet's explanation in comments to the original post. I’d get my wages, I’d get tips, and then I would get my own personal tips from finding money on the floor. The sentence is a list of the benefits of working at the club. Wages Tips My own personal tips She could have said "my personal tips" or "my own tips" ...


2

Your first inclination was correct, that the people were willing to participate without being compensated (better phrasing may admittedly have been that they were willing to "forgo payment"). If it were intended to say that people were actually paying to participate, that's an unnaturally awkward way to phrase the statement. If the author intended to say "...


2

For was her god not the god of ruin? This sentence is a rhetorical question – while it appears to be a question, its purpose is to be a statement explaining Hareetha's actions. The fact that Hareetha is laughing at the destruction of Behemoth Mountain appears strange, but the speaker is using this rhetorical question to remind us that she worships a god of ...


2

For was her god not the god of ruin? While the sentence is rhetorical, it also has an almost archaic structure to it. It can be paraphrased as: Wasn't this because her god was the god of ruin? The use of for implies a reason for the fact that the mountain lay in ruins.


1

Rain or shine is an idiom which means - under any circumstances. Here, it means that wind and solar power cannot be generated in every case i.e. there might not be enough wind to move the wind turbines and/or it might be a rainy day or just night and there's no sun to charge the solar cells. In the line "Today, renewables work only with fossil-fuel backup", ...


1

The second sentence is making two points, and it's a bit confusing that they put them both in the same sentence, as they're not really directly related. The first point is that American businesses put up with China's tight restrictions because there's so much business opportunity there. The second point is that China apparently has all these restrictions ...


1

"Whatever is a profession" seems to be used in the sense of "any activity that comprises a profession". "...and maintains numbers" seems to be used in the sense of "and (any profession) which is capable of establishing and reproducing an appreciable number of practising members". What the author is asserting is his view that any profession is within the ...


1

Rubber as a verb can hold two meanings. The act of eavesdropping 1999, Los Angeles Times, "Party's Over for Rural Phone Customers in Green Mountain State," (Jan. 31, 1999): "There's a lot of nostalgia about the phone and how it was the way to get the local news," said Jane Beck of the Vermont Folklife Center in Middlebury. One way was "rubbering," or ...


1

Welcome to EL&U, Blein. There is some apparent overlap in the meaning of these words but really they are quite different. The Oxford Learner's Dictionary defines the verb to value as meaning to think that somebody/something is important or to decide that something is worth a particular amount of money The same dictionary defines to evaluate as ...


1

Definition is a statement expressing the essential nature of something (Merriam-Webster). Definition of something tells you "what that is, what's its essence." A car can be defined as a wheeled motor vehicle used for transportation, primarily on roads, which usually seats one to eight people, has four tires, and mainly transports people rather than goods....


1

Welcome to EL&U, Ali."The proverbial couch" is a reference to the term couch potato. Merriam Webster defines it as : a lazy and inactive person especially : one who spends a great deal of time watching television Proverbial is defined by the Cambridge Dictionary as as used in a proverb or other phrase: So "...to get you up off the proverbial ...


1

Is "personal" redundant here? No. This word signals that the meaning of "tips" is now going to be somewhat different. How does it contribute to the meaning of the sentence? It signals that we are going to another level. The first level of payment is the formal wages, the second is the tips, and the now the new level is the findings while doing the (...


1

It's interesting to use "so much as" on the middle of an idiom, in this case "to burst (one's) bubble" which means to disappoint by bringing back to reality (as in, "I'm sorry to burst your bubble but the train is always late.") The author is playing on that phrase by perhaps implying that their bubble was not suddenly burst, or not burst by external forces, ...


1

As Xanne's answer says it means "except". This is a valid meaning of "but", however it isn't used much these days: ordinary English has changed quite a lot since 1791. Gooling "but define" returns, among others, this entry from the Online Oxford Living Dictionary in which: meaning 2 is {with negative or in questions} Used to indicate the impossibility ...


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