3

Once again, a few caveats, before we start: "Passive" applies to clauses, not sentences. Only simple sentences, without subordinate clauses, can be called "passive sentences", if the main and only clause is passive. Therefore, there is no "active mood" for a sentence to be in, and no "passive mood" that you can ...


2

Both exist but are not particularly common. I will start with the second which is more used than the first. To dupe somebody out of something is not recorded as a set phrase in the dictionaries, but you can find examples with it: It is alleged to have duped some 5,000 people out of as much as $40 million. (Collins) This local police site says: A warning ...


2

Those are resultative constructions in which the result is expressed by a prepositional phrase; they do sound natural, but they are either not quite idiomatic (the first) or not attested in the dictionaries (the second). The first construction is extremely rare, and in fact I find nothing for "out" (ngram). The unique case concerns the preposition ...


2

Syntactically, OP's text is fine with or without to, but I certainly find this NGram usage chart interesting... I'm fairly sure that as a general principle, the prevalence (and semantic significance) of prepositions in English has been increasing over the centuries. The specific verb in our sights here is to send, but it's worth noting this... If a ...


1

No. There are a couple of mistakes here. "Whom" refers to a person. In your sentence it can only refer to "God", not "things". For "things", you should use "that" or "which". You have two different pronouns ("whom" and "them") for the "things". Your structure uses a ...


1

It is grammatically possible but semantically preposterous, except in some dialects.† To see this more clearly, let’s look your ditransitive verb sentence in the active and passive voices. For illustration purposes, I’m changing him to Kim and adding the agent Pat to your passive voice version: Here it is with the direct object following the verb and the ...


1

This letter was sent him yesterday. This is the passive. The passive form does not take an indirect object; it takes adverbial prepositional phrases as complements. In full, this would be This letter was sent (i)by me (ii) to him (iii)yesterday. In “I sent him this letter yesterday”, the active form does take (i) two objects, (a direct and an indirect) or (...


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