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6

Well, here's an article in The Atlantic from as far back as 2013. It suggested that this use of "because" as a preposition had already become common even then. https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/11/english-has-a-new-preposition-because-internet/281601/ At the same time, the Cambridge Dictionary acknowledges the prepositional use of the word ...


4

The dictionary confirms that cancer has a plural, cancers. It also confirms that cancer is a variable noun, so it can be countable or uncountable. As cancers grow, a cancer is singular no matter how large it is or how far it spreads. Clinicans refer to multiple cancer sites when someone has different kinds of cancers, but everyday speech you might say ...


3

This kind of person might be described as a "rabble-rouser," defined by Merriam-Webster as "one that stirs up the masses of the people (as to hatred or violence)." Alternatively, they might be a "provocateur," which Merriam-Webster defines as "one who provokes."


2

Taking specific examples is not particularly helpful when discussing the general idea of countability/uncountability. Nouns are strange things. They resemble Schrödinger’s Cat: a noun is neither countable nor uncountable until it is observed in context. As guidance, a noun is never uncountable unless it is used in a context that makes it uncountable. So, ...


2

checkout (M-W) checkout noun Definition of checkout (Entry 1 of 2) 1: the action or an instance of checking out … Educators receive new library card privileges, including 100 simultaneous checkouts … — Andrew Wilson and Leanne Ellis Disclaimer: Of course, checkout(s) has other meanings and is context dependent (library, hotel, store,...


1

This would seem to be an established use of curse ...both of us cursing that we had not brought our skis ...and cursed that he hadn't the time to bind it before now ...others curse that they never got within range All of the above make sense if the definition of curse is taken to be (Merriam Webster 2b): to execrate in fervent and often ...


1

In your example, built is a nominalised adjective: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nominalized_adjective The most common appearance of the nominalized adjective in English is when an adjective is used to indicate a collective group. This happens in the case where a phrase such as the poor people becomes the poor. The adjective poor is nominalized, and the ...


1

a whale – probably borrowed from the financial industry, meaning a big investor. a bear – specifically referenced in How to Marry a Millionaire (1953) in the context of 3 gold diggers setting a 'bear trap', and only needing to trap 1 bear.


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