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44 votes

I am looking for a word (a noun preferably but an adjective would suffice) that denotes a person that knowingly allows another to use them regularly

One possibility: Merriam-Webster doormat 2: one that submits without protest to abuse or indignities It's metaphoric extension of the basic meaning - someone who gets "walked on" a lot.
15 votes

I am looking for a word (a noun preferably but an adjective would suffice) that denotes a person that knowingly allows another to use them regularly

I would propose pushover or lapdog Pushover someone unable to resist an attraction or appeal : sucker Lapdog 2 : a servile dependent or follower
12 votes

I am looking for a word (a noun preferably but an adjective would suffice) that denotes a person that knowingly allows another to use them regularly

A fashionable word is "simp". It refers to men who allow themselves to be used by women in the hope of receiving favours or approval. The older meaning of this word is "simpleton", ...
7 votes

I am looking for a word (a noun preferably but an adjective would suffice) that denotes a person that knowingly allows another to use them regularly

Consider servile: too eager to serve and please someone else in a way that shows you do not have much respect for yourself Cambridge Dictionary
  • 10.4k
6 votes
Accepted

I am looking for a word (a noun preferably but an adjective would suffice) that denotes a person that knowingly allows another to use them regularly

Can I suggest milquetoast? a timid, meek, or unassertive person A milquetoast person knows they are being abused, but does nothing about it. I think it fits pretty well, though the word is often ...
5 votes

Blogosphere: what is it?

I think you are overthinking the idea. The definitions you give, taken together, should give you a good idea of the concept of "the blogosphere". If they don't the OED may be of help to you ...
  • 29.9k
5 votes

I am looking for a word (a noun preferably but an adjective would suffice) that denotes a person that knowingly allows another to use them regularly

If the person is a man and the word can be a little vulgar then pussy whipped would be an option. The Free Dictionary: "pussy whipped: (vulgar slang) Totally controlled, domineered, or ...
  • 152
3 votes

I am looking for a word (a noun preferably but an adjective would suffice) that denotes a person that knowingly allows another to use them regularly

subservient She was subservient to her partner to a fault. Cambridge Dictionary defines the term as adjective • disapproving willing to do what other people want, or considering your wishes as ...
  • 86.2k
2 votes

I am looking for a word (a noun preferably but an adjective would suffice) that denotes a person that knowingly allows another to use them regularly

Co-dependent — this was very popular in the 1980s. I'm surprised it hasn't shown up yet. From Mental Health America via Google: A tendency to do more than their share, all of the time. A tendency to ...
1 vote

I am looking for a word (a noun preferably but an adjective would suffice) that denotes a person that knowingly allows another to use them regularly

Why does it always have to be one word with these posts? I just do not get it. Nonetheless obsequious and credulous are the two words I should use to describe the person about whom you are talking.
  • 57
1 vote

In the sentence "He doesn't like people telling him what to do" why is there a Gerund after people and not an infinitve?

He doesn't like people [telling him what to do]. Infinitival clauses are not nouns. Clauses have a verb as their head, while noun phrases have a noun as their head. And clauses don't function as ...
  • 10.4k
1 vote

I am looking for a word (a noun preferably but an adjective would suffice) that denotes a person that knowingly allows another to use them regularly

I immediately thought "tool", but that doesn't necessarily imply love as a motivator. Also, "tool" subtly implies not knowing you're being used (possibly willing disbelief), so ...
  • 127
1 vote

Gerund as a passive adjective

It is true that *the being injected material doesn't make sense, but the material being injected is perfectly fine. This is a type of reduced relative clause - reduced to a present participle phrase. ...
  • 18.9k
1 vote

Should "lecturer" be capitalised?

If it is a job title, then yes. Please report any misprints to either Professor Jones or Lecturer Smith. If it is a generic noun, then no. Our department employs six lecturers but only one janitor.
  • 22.5k
1 vote

Are there any differences between "oval" and "ellipse"?

In geometry a ellipse has two foci, a major axis and a minor axis which are perpendicular to each other and the foci are located on the major axis. It is possible to draw an ellipse using two pins (or ...
  • 16.5k

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