Hot answers tagged

59

"Lemma" is from a Greek word that had t in some of its forms Etymologically, the t in lemmatize comes from the stem of the Greek word λῆμμα, which is the source of the English word lemma. Greek nouns have many inflected forms: the citation form λῆμμα is just the nominative (and accusative) singular form. Most other forms of a Greek noun are built on a stem ...


20

Etymonline states: 1560s, in mathematics, from Greek lemma (plural lemmata) "something received or taken; an argument; something taken for granted," (emphasis mine) This is where the 'T' comes from. In addition, note that lemma derives from Greek, whereas your other examples come from Latin through French. This would account for the difference in forms....


6

American here. These are the terms I would know them by: Pie Pan (metal)/pie dish (glass) Bundt cake pan Springform pan Baking dish


4

What both you and your friend have done is made an adjective (hardcore, calm) into a noun through the process of nominalization. In this case, both of you use the adjective form to specify a group of people who have that quality: the hardcore (people), the calm (people). We see this in many established idioms and proverbs: Blessed are the meek, for they ...


2

As a practical matter, I wouldn't recommend trying to analyze the grammar of "something the matter" in terms of "the matter" being a noun phrase. It looks like one, but I don't know of any way in which it behaves like one in this context. I also don't know of any useful way to explain the grammar with the concept of ellipsis. Idiomatically, "the matter" can ...


2

Much is always used together with an uncountable noun. Many is always used with nouns that are countable. (Source) As Friend is countable, many would be used. (too many friends)


2

Tart form. A pie plate/dish/pan has a flat bottom and sloping sides. Common sizes are 9 and 10 inches. Your dish has an indentation designed to hold fruit or other filling in the finished baked good. You can't bake a pie in one of these. Believe me, I’ve tried. This is a Pyrex pie plate: The closest you'll get to a Guglhupf pan in English is a Bundt pan, ...


1

It's not a matter of singular or plural it's about the mood; "long live [whatever]" expresses a desire for the future, "long lives [whatever]" would be a statement of the present state of affairs, if anyone said it that way. The origin of the phrase "long live Europe" is probably le roi est mort, vive le roi or the king is dead, long live the king, the first ...


1

sit as a transitive verb means to put somebody/thing in a sitting position seat is also a verb, meaning to place something on something, (usually) so it fits closely Sit Dolly and Teddy at the toys' picnic table. Seat the gasket around the base of the tube. seat can also be used to mean to give somebody a place to sit; to sit down in a place (...


1

The word "calm" can absolutely be a noun. The OED has several definitions that are nouns. These two are the most relevant to your example: c. figurative of social or political conditions and circumstances. 1547 J. Harrison Exhort. Scottes 210 The stormes of this tempestious worlde, shall shortely come to a calme. 1609 Shakespeare Troilus ...


1

a pitch to to pitch TFD a sales talk Informal. to attempt to sell or win approval for; promote; advertise As in: to He gave a pitch to use his product at a sales convention.


1

If you really want something based on straw you might use some variation like "mannequin" or "scarecrow" or something like that. I'd suggest not using "straw-man" that way. Some other possibilities: Paste-up First-draft or even zeroth-draft Mock-up Hollywood interface (refers to a chunk of software that has the visible parts but no functionality, based on ...


1

You're dealing with an idiom. something be the matter (with X) is a verbal idiom that means 'something is wrong, broken, sick, or otherwise out of order'. It can be applied to machines, emotions, health, or life in general. Intransitively, it means there is a problem (indefinite -- something or anything is the usual word, or nothing if it's negative). ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible