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4

You are correct. That is not idiomatic. While "that big of a [noun]" is commonly used, you can see from this Google Ngram comparison that usage of "one big of" is practically non-existent


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You could use epistilologist or epistilographer. However these words tend to mean both those who study letters and those who are skilled in the art of letter writing. "Epistilologist" is a description associated with the Russian historian V.A. Smetanin, who specialised in the study of letters (see Hatlie). "Epistilology"/"...


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In commerce, if you are able to treat one side as the seller and the other as the buyer, then the buyer provides consideration for the seller's supply. Consideration may be thought of as the concept of value offered and accepted by people or organisations entering into contracts. Anything of value promised by one party to the other when making a contract ...


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This is comic inversion (or comedic inversion) or, more ploddingly stated, amusing reversal. It parallels your anastrophe, which seems to have no comic overtones. The term is implicit in literary analysis: Inversion and Subversion: During different eras, drama has been considered morally wrong, politically dangerous and dubious, but comedy has always been ...


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Articifial mythology, or mythopoeia describes the devices in fiction, fantasy, or world building that can sometimes be quite parallel to our own. In the same vein as your examples, the Thursday Next series by Jasper Fforde is a parallel world of metafiction with worlds within worlds of alternate history where fantastic literary detectives police novels ...


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Here's my take:The expression "go home" being elliptical, "home" takes on the meaning of the missing preposition (hence its name). Pseudogapping begets semantic void. [https://www.thoughtco.com/ellipsis-grammar-and-rhetoric-1690640][1]


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You could call such a person an epistoler. epistoler, literary: A letter-writer; = epistler Lexico Epistolist is another word for a letter-writer. Someone who writes epistles Collins


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This is called calling someone's bluff. Challenge someone to carry out a stated intention, in the expectation of being able to expose it as a pretence. She was tempted to call his bluff, hardly believing he'd carry out his threat. [Lexico]


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You can test each possibility by substitution with words that you are confident are nouns, adverbs and so on. Noun: “it’s time to go * car” - this doesn’t work. Adverb: “it’s time to go quietly” - this is grammatical, but quietly provides the manner of going while home in the original quote doesn’t. Preposition: “it’s time to go up” - this is grammatical and ...


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