21

This may be subtle and comes down to inflection and intention. I suspect that your manager was not being rude but trying to refer succinctly to a particular trade. If you were talking about a construction site you might talk about the "concrete people" or the "drywall people" to refer to the particular trades that were expert in those parts of the project. ...


9

It depends on the implication. If you assume "floor" to be a metaphor for "the lowest strata" or "beneath my feet" then certainly, it's derogatory. However, I don't think this was your manager's intention. Instead, in his question, "floor people" is an ellipsis of the people whose job it is to clean the floor This use is much the same as saying "the ...


9

Since biblioclasm is basically unheard of in the English language, and bibliopyrosis was literally unheard of prior to this question, I think the question deserves an answer that will actually be recognized: book burning noun : destruction of writing or pictures regarded as politically or socially harmful or subversive or produced by persons ...


9

They are very different constructions, though both are (probably) possible here. First, note that stop, like many verbs denoting a change of state, can be used both transitively and intransitively: The boy stopped the ball. (transitive) The ball stopped (intransitive). The transitive use usually implies that the stopping was caused by something ...


7

Both sentences are grammatical. They can both be used in the same contexts, with the same results. The sentences differ only in the Wh- clause at the end: [American pronunciation]: from where it was stopped [frəmˌwɛɹɪʔwɨ'stapt] from where it has stopped [frəmˌwɛɹɪɾɨ'stapt] Phonetically, the boldfaced portions above are almost identical. But they have ...


4

Big is an adjective. Much is not. You can say "he is big" but not "he is much". Enough modifies adjectives (or verbs). It's an adverb (or a determiner). So "he is big enough" or "he is rich enough" or "he has studied enough", but there must be a verb or an adjective for it to make sense. Much is also an adverb/determiner, just like enough. You can often ...


4

There may be some dialect that uses I mind to in that way, but I am not aware of one. I am minded to feels old-fashioned to me, but certainly you still hear it where I live.


2

From the OED: minded a. In predicative use only: intending, disposed, inclined to (†for to) (do something). to be so minded: to be inclined to do what has been mentioned or specified. and the idiom: TFD if you've a mind to do something, your second sentence is more correct: I am minded to seek cheaper results inside the supermarket. In AmE, I ...


2

Without more context its hard to say. "His flaws hinder him" works in a general sense, but if you want to be more specific, context is needed. But speaking specifically to the 'lacking' aspect - perhaps deficiencies is a possible answer: From Merriam-Webster: : the quality or state of being defective or of lacking some necessary quality or element ...


2

It's just writing, and technical regulatory writing at that, so nothing about this would have the gravitas of literature grammar. The mood of the sentence is imperative ("Learn about...") up until that dependent relative clause "that was mandatory." As you point out, this is further complicated by the semantic implications of "mandatory," i.e., it might as ...


1

"I accept my fault" implies that you are admitting that you were at fault at a given point. As defined in Oxford English Dictionary: An unattractive or unsatisfactory feature, especially in a piece of work or in a person's character. "I accept it was my fault" indicates that a specific result was produced because of your mistake. It should also be ...


1

Just say I was born in 1988 or whatever year was


1

This is a different exchange that seems to conclude that there is no good single word. Some suggest Member. https://ux.stackexchange.com/questions/95088/whats-a-good-single-word-term-that-means-a-user-whos-signed-in-to-your-websit Other possibilities: If you are looking for a word to describe recent (but not necessarily current) users I'd suggest ...


1

Answering your question, I think a nice word is wistfulness characterized by melancholy; longing; yearning. It's pensive, especially in a melancholy way.


1

I think "I should note that our current users range from juniors to seniors and graduates."? can give the same meaning.


1

the sidewalk shuffle: the awkward dance that results when two people approach each other from opposite directions, each attempts to move out of the other's way, and both end up moving in the same direction. Often followed by further ungainly movement, apologies, and awkward laughter. [Urban Dictionary]


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