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15

You're actually correct about the etymologies: they are cognate with four and three, respectively. Farthing is from Old English fēorthing, from fēortha "fourth" + -ing 1. Riding is from Middle English triding, Old English *thriding, which is from Old Norse thridjungr "third part"; the Middle English t- was a variant of Old English th-; this -t was later ...


6

A farthing is an obsolete British coin, a quarter of an old (pre-decimal) penny. As far as I know it is only used for an administrative region in the works of Tolkien. A riding is one of the three former administrative regions of the county of Yorkshire. The word is not used in this sense in any other context. I agree with Cerberus that there isn't a word ...


4

An the English word meaning "1/3 of a circle" is trine, but it is now only used in astrology. It was also used in astronomy to describe the position of two objects when there was an angle of approximately 120 degrees between, until modern accurate measurements made such an imprecise term redundant.


3

I'm afraid this child is, in fact, a native speaker - since the language is already hardwired in his/her brain. I am aware that the word 'native' relates to origin by birth, but in the case of languages, the word 'native' is closely related to how deeply intrinsic the language is in one's life and culture.


3

Low Valley Given that the first line uses high, I think the 2nd line is using low as its antonym. Per Google Ngram Viewer, it does seem like low valley is not as common as deep valley (although not nonexistant): I think usage of "low" versus "deep" also lends the song some additional benefits. It's easier to modulate "low" (and more fun) than deep. Wide ...


3

You have spared them unnecessary effort. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/spare Verb, definition 3: to relieve of the necessity of doing or undergoing something.


3

Consider eloquent: 1 Fluent or persuasive in speaking or writing. Oxford Living Dictionaries


2

"Such that" is idiomatic mathematical jargon most often used in the definition of mathematical objects. The usage in your example is a bit atypical. The phrase is difficult to directly gloss, but one possible rendering for the phrase as it is used in definitions is "...for which it is true that..." For example, we define a rational number as "any p/q such ...


2

Hee, hee. All of them are ‘wrong’ in the sense that they are not standard usage in Britain. South Wales …is what people say (and have been saying for a long time, hence New South Wales, the former British colony and now a state in Australia). See, for example the Wikipedia entry, this tourist guide and a newspaper, The South Wales Argus.


2

I'm thinking w/o deadline. This means that you don't actually need a different word—but are simply looking for ways to make the phrase shorter. Given this, I think that no deadline would be simpler and take up even less space.


2

Given that Appendices brevia is not an English phrase. A printed book is fixed, not a "work in progress". A web page usually is a "work in progress", or dormant. then your phrase Author's World-building Notes seems to be the right approach.


2

I think you'd get more interesting answers if you asked this question on https://music.stackexchange.com, but here's my take on it. First, thanks for posting an alternative, because reading it made it clearer to me why the original is the way it is. how to make the same note sound different Think about how the lines are sung, and where the emphasis is ...


1

There are the language specific names such as Anglophone - fluent in English, Francophone - fluent in French. According to the OED these can be used both as nouns and adjectives. However they can be applied to non-native speakers as well, such as language teachers and students, translators and similar.


1

How do we call each of the parts of a circle divided in 3 parts? Like with alephzero's trine, this mostly just shows up in astrology, but another term that shows up is trigon Astrology (a) A set of three signs of the zodiac, distant 120° from each other, as if at the angles of an equilateral triangle... (Also figurative or allusively.) (b) The ...


1

You can use "once" or "used to" separately but they are generally not used together. As in, "I once read the Times every day" or "I used to read the Times every day."


1

Hyphenated adjectives Adjectives like "one of its kind" should be written with hyphens, to remove the exact problem that's making it difficult for you to make a decision here. To make your decision simpler, replace "one of its kind" with "yellow", a one-word adjective, and look at your two options again. We are yellow app ... We are a yellow app ... It ...


1

Used colloquially, the two phrases are equivalent (I am very hungry). In the UK anyway, the choice between them is regional. But interestingly, in Lancashire the phrase "I'm starved" can mean "I am cold". Foreign nurses trained to understand Lancashire phrases.


1

"Abandon" and "Forsake" imply permanence. In your example the people who forsook farms and villages are not coming back. Similarly the owner of an abandoned car doesn't want it any more. "Leave" can be both permanent ("I left home when I was 18") and temporary ("I leave home every morning at 7:30") Although "Abandon" and "Forsake" can be applied to both ...


1

When referring to a section and a subsection (or a paragraph and sub-paragraph, etc) the abbreviation that corresponds to the highest 'level' of the section (or paragraph, etc) should be used -- for example, using the Section Designation Guidelines from DBSK_FAN and imagining that it was taken from 'Chapter 9 - Witty Examples', you would say 'chapter 9, ...


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