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The last explanation here is the most to the point: go by a manual of style. However, the example is an incorrect rendering of the Chicago manual. First, the answer to your question is "no"--with the exception of the hyphen (as you see here, a quotation mark followed by a hyphen). Second, since the sentence which has the questions within it is not a question,...


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There is considerable leeway given to titles, as evidenced by terms such as headlinese. Quite separately, however, “why green” can be parsed as a question, or alternatively, as the introduction to an answer. As a question, it can be thought of as an ellipsed form of “Why is it green?” As a non-question, it can be thought of as an ellipsed form of “This is ...


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Yeah, a four dot ellipsis is mostly used to indicate omitted text in a quotation after a sentence ends, but can also be used to convey pauses, silences, leading statements & unfinished thoughts that occur after a sentence ends. To use your example: Alf: "Are you sure Mary isn't the park poo-jogger?" Bazza: "Well, today, Mary went to the park...." Alf: "...


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Interesting question, but the sentence sounds odd. As soon as I read your question, the concept of Relative Clauses tugged upon my mind. Upon further searching, I found out that your sentence can be better presented with a co-ordinating conjunction. In this case, it might be better off as: I don't have access to the internet right now, so could you handle ...


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Titles like this are appositives: a construction where one noun phrase identifies an adjacent. Your question on comma use is almost a duplicate of this one, but a little broader, so I'll try to answer it in full. I'll quote the same style guideline as the top answer there: Commas are used to set off an appositive when the appositive can only refer to a ...


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TL;DR My short answer? Punctuate your sentence in one of the following two ways: "The contents of your bag will include cheese, crackers and, optionally, vegetable stock." "The contents of your bag will include cheese, crackers and (optionally) vegetable stock." THE LONG & BORING ANSWER To be really boring, your question raises two technical ...


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If you are treating your email signature as something that will more-or-less be fully or partially cut/pasted for your surface-mail address, you should format your address in the signature the way your national postal authority recommends. As you have used an address in the United Kingdom as an example, I conclude that you are in the UK, and thus that the ...


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I'll discuss the arguments in favor of adjectival analysis that Greg Lee offered in the post above. PPs come after the noun they modify, not before. Not only PPs but any possible form can be made a noun premodifier with the help of punctuation. I'll repeat that it is not only wrong to classify "off the cuff" as an adjective, even worse, it obscures ...


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"Off the cuff" cannot be thought of as a word in any grammatical context. As a syntactic constituent, this sequence of words is a prepositional phrase. As a PP it can be used as an attributive noun modifier, predicative complement or a manner adjunct. He apologized for his off-the-cuff remark. His remark was off the cuff. The question cannot ...


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