21

Because they differ in (Wells's model of) General American. The whole point of lexical sets is to make it easier to describe differences between accents. Since not only phonetic values but the distribution of phonemes vary across accents, it's often not enough to say e.g. "What is phoneme X in Received Pronunciation is realized as Y in this accent" ...


8

A lexical set does not represent a vowel. It represents a set of words that are all pronounced with the same vowel phoneme in Wells's two reference accents of "Received Pronunciation" and "General American". These are artificial standards and as Nardog says, Accents of English was written several decades ago, so this is not exactly ...


2

Bog-standard being related to toilets/lavatories at some point is probably because of the term bog-house. In your quote from OED, it says that the use of box-standard in the meaning of "ordinary" first appeared in 1983, thus making this theory not as possible. I have also found that 1983 quote, just for fun. This quote was said by the inventor Sir ...


2

All are comprehensible, but they're not all equal. First some to avoid: (d) is wrong because "between" is (usually) paired with "and" not "to". (c) can be read as the analysis taking place during that time, rather than being an analysis of data from that period. (e) "until" doesn't quite seem idiomatic here. Beyond ...


1

As an adjective, equal is defined (to quote one source) as: -the same in amount, number, or size -someone or something that has the same importance as someone or something else and deserves the same treatment -the same in amount, number, or size Cambridge From this point of view it is therefore impossible to make a comparative. Either two things are equal ...


1

Early figurative occurrences of 'smashing' as an adjective With regard to early instances of "smashing" used in a figurative sense—specifically in the sense of "whopping" or "bang-up" (that is, variously, "forceful," "very large," "impressive," or "successful")—an Elephind search of ...


1

I'm from California and how I personally say the words is can is pronounced the same as the name Ken whereas can't is pronounced like how most people say can and the "t" isn't pronounced.


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