9

I suspect the intended meaning is, "As the farmers, we provide all our teas with a Tea Passport..." The producers are saying that they have farmed the tea themselves, rather than bought it from others, and therefore can vouch for its "quality and sustainability".


5

I think this may be a case of a misplaced modifier. Consider the part As the farmers, all our teas... It seems to suggest that teas are the farmers. Equivalently, if you use the participle phrase Being the farmers, all our teas..., the participle phrase Being the farmers is left dangling. So, one might rephrase the sentence as— As the farmers we sell all our ...


5

Which one is standard depends on which variety of English you speak. In the U.S., the standard pronunciation is [ɛ]. If you say [bɛt], people would understand you to be saying bet, while if you say [bet], it might be heard as bait (although probably not if the meaning is clear from context). In the U.K., the standard RP (upper-class) pronunciation used to be ...


3

Ngram charts of 'despatch' versus 'dispatch' The Ngram chart plotting the frequency of occurrence of "despatch" (blue line) versus "dispatch" (red line) for the period 1650–2019 is rather unusual: The chart shows an extended period (roughly 160 years) of dominance for dispatch early on, followed by a sudden decline around 1810, ...


3

In ordinary American speech the second syllable of dirigible is very likely to be deleted. That is the fate of most such unstressed syllables with centralized vowels in long words that were inherited from Latin, a syllable-timed language where every syllable, and thus every vowel, was pronounced in the same rhythm, like Modern Spanish. Modern English, by ...


3

According to A Shakespeare Glossary by C. T. Onions, revised by Robert D. Eagleson (Oxford University Press, 1986), "tenable" means Capable of being held, that may be kept back or held secret The adjective has the same stem as the French verb "tenir" (and the Spanish verb "tener"), which can mean both "to hold" and &...


2

In AmE the pronunciation is rather [ɛ]: /bɛd/; in BrE the traditional pronunciation, considered to be RP by some, is [e]: /bed/. However, in BrE regional variants tend towards [ɛ] or are [ɛ]. This can be verified at John Wells Phonetic Blog.


2

I hear a mistranslation and a word that is missing, but assumed: "As the farmers know, all our teas come with blah, blah, blah, but really." As it stands, our farmers are dangling in wait of Lord-knows-what but a hook to hang their straw hat on. Remember that marketing BS does not have to do more than put us in a good mood. So when all else fails,...


2

As it stands this sentence is grammatical (with the added comma), but makes no sense (the farmers come with a Passport… and so do the teas.). What was probably meant and what makes most sense is this. As we are also the farmers growing those teas, we are able to guarantee quality and sustainability from bush to cup and that is ascertained for each one of ...


2

As a native speaker of British English (Surrey), I pronounce all those words with a fronted vowel [ɑ̟]. It's also a bit raised. In fact, all the people around me pronounce them with [ɑ̟]. [ɑː] is considered too "posh" in my neck of woods.


2

Dictionary.com https://www.dictionary.com/browse/ridiculous defines ridiculous as causing or worthy of ridicule or derision; absurd; preposterous; laughable The original meaning is "causing or worthy of ridicule", but the word is now often used to mean "absurd" without a strong negative connotation. This allows for the slang meaning, ...


2

I am a non-native English speaker, and you are not alone in getting confused. However, we have two clues to help us get less confused: Look at the content You should look at the expression in the content it is said. If it is used in negative/ positive content, it also probably means something negative/ positive. E.g., That is ridiculous! He has no ...


2

Origin : While I would love to do A, I cannot wait to do B. "While~do A" is an adverbial clause(an adverbial clause is also an adverb). I cannot wait to do B while I would love to do A. We removed the comma. It looks more easy now. But you should remind that "while clause" almost always(as I know) is closely related with main clause so ...


2

See "subjunctive" "What if money were beautiful" relates a hypothetical situation. "What if money was beautiful" relates a past tense, at some time in the past it was true. As time passes, the subjunctive is being used less and less, and sometimes it is replaced by the past tense.


1

The sentence is something akin to the passive voice: although grammatically speaking, the subject of the main verb is "all our teas", the teas aren't really performing the action, they are the recipient of the action. A more clearly passive voice construction would be "all our teas are sent with a Tea Passport guaranteeing quality and ...


1

The phrase "dot-and-carry-one" is used by Mary Stewart in Chapter 6 of her novel The Gabriel Hounds, published in 1967. She wrote, Then I recklessly dragged the bed away from the wall. It came across the cracked marble with a dot-and-carry-one screech of broken castors. I take the "dot-and-carry-one" to mean that the bed moved in a ...


1

[Learniv] This verb has both an irregular and regular form. You can use both and both are correct. Speakers in North America and Canada use learned while the rest of the English-speaking world seems to prefer learnt. Learned (but not learnt) is also an adjective. When said of a person, it means ‘ having a lot of knowledge because you have studied and read a ...


1

Rugger often stands for Rugby Football, usually called Rugby, in informal English. And that makes sense in combination with team. 'Made the team' means 'joined the team'. The first team is the best of the teams in the school. And XI stands for the number of players in the field, 11 in this case, so a reduced size team, as explained in a comment by @...


1

It is so unfortunate that “remember me to ___” is going out of fashion. It is such a good way of saying Let ——- know that I say hello. In fact, it means more than just "hello", it’s fonder with a hint of respect. It sounds very formal but many times I’ve heard this colloquially used in Nottinghamshire growing up. Very pleasant to the ear.


1

Historically firstborn boys were very often named after their father and firstborn girls after their mother. My family tree has four successive Williams in the 19th century, and the practice was widespread before then. 18th century parish records might show "John son of John Price jnr was born", or even "John son of John Price jnr. (cooper) ...


1

It refers to the direction of travel from the Clink prison, in Southwark (London, England), to the gallows at Tyburn (London, England). The Clink dates back to the twelfth century, and the earliest recorded execution at Tyburn was also in the twelfth century: it's possible the expression is of similar vintage. You can still visit the Clink but Tyburn gallows ...


1

I am (almost) certain no one uses pressurize in the US or Canada in this way unless maybe they are originally from the UK. As a Canadian who lives on the border and watches both Canadian and US media all the time I have never in my 50 years heard talk of pressurizing people except on Corrie.


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