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The Oxford English Dictionary has this definition: piss-take  n. colloquial (chiefly British, Australian, and New Zealand) a parody, a send-up; an instance of mockery Related to this is the earlier attested expression take the piss (out of): colloquial (chiefly British, Australian, and New Zealand): to make fun (of), to mock, deride, satirize (Ibid.)


4

Her majesty's government has a legal definition of a childminder. It is someone who is paid to look after someone else's children in their own home. This is distinct from a babysitter or nanny who looks after someone else's children in that someone else's home.


3

GDoS suggest a possible origin from medieval French roussin: Rozzer: (also rawser, razzer, rosser, roz) [? Rom. roozlo, strong or roast, a villain; B&L suggest rousse, roussin, a policeman (from Medieval. Fr. roussin, a warhorse or hunter)] a police officer; also attrib. 1888 [UK] Sporting times 26 May n.p.: Up walks a rozzer and ...


3

The use of what is sometimes referred to as the emphatic do expresses the speaker's personal desire that the command be performed. It seems to re-frame what would otherwise be a simple command as something approaching a request. Thus, one might say "Do sit down" to a guest in a situation where "Sit down" would sound rude. (Modern American speakers might be ...


3

It is a participle. You can tell this because it qualifies (describes) "they", the subject of the verb. Being a participle, it is a kind of adjective: a verbal adjective. that is, it is an adjective formed from a verb base - in this case, hear. Now in the following sentence, hearing is a so-called gerund. Hearing the sound was the most significant ...


3

Use of the article 'a' is correct because when triangle is used, it hasn't been previously introduced; the specification follows after the subject. The sentence is wrong, though, because of number: "whose side is 3cm, 14cm and 7.5cm." wrong because there are three sides (and three measurements). "whose sides are..." would be correct.


2

No. For example, in the 2004 printing of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (for the British market, by Bloomsbury, the British publisher for the series), something is repeatedly hyphenated (pp. 46, 73, 135, 141, etc.)


2

The word “unticked” is found defined in the Cambridge Dictionary but not in the Merriam-Webster online dictionary. It is not used in American English and the equivalent word is “unchecked”. Normally you would say either, I left the tick box unticked. BRITISH OR I left the checkbox unchecked. AMERICAN It may be regarded as strange by many ...


1

In the religious/ritualistic sense, the verb is "to anoint [oneself] [+ with]" (Anoint can be transitive or intransitive.) OED: To smear with an unguent. To smear or rub over (medicinally or cosmetically) with oil or unguent; to oil, grease, apply ointment to. 1611 Bible (A.V.) Rev. iii. 18 Anoint thine eyes with eye salve, that thou ...


1

Essentially, there is no difference. Depending on context, to have can have various meanings, one of which is "take". He has a car - has = owns; possesses, etc. He has a headache - has = is experiencing; is suffering from We had a shower - had = took We had a shower - we used to own a shower


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"unticked" is a valid adjective. "Accounting: A Practical Approach" Valarie Wilson, ‎Suellen Freeman, ‎John Freeman - 2015 - Page 295: b Unticked items in the cash payments journal or cash book represent unpresented cheques...


1

It means exactly what it says. The speakers hopes that when they are in a car accident rather than being 'trapped' by the seatbelt they are thrown out of the vehicle, somehow miraculously avoiding injury in the process. As the quote says, "a view since proven as wholly terrible".


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