5

The other answer is correct. They are not allophones. But if you want even more proof, in the form of a minimal pair, the two words tarry /ˈtɑːri/, (to be covered with tar) and tarry /ˈtæri/ (to delay) are a minimal pair, where the difference in these vowels distinguishes the two meanings.


4

'Acker' in the nineteenth century Whether acker in the sense of "friend or mate" is Somerset-specific or not, the term probably arose within the past 100 years. William Holloway, A General Dictionary of Provincialisms (1840) has nothing for acker in the relevant sense, nor does James Halliwell, A Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words (1852) or ...


4

Bail out appears to be more common than bale out in BrE, at the moment at least. Ngram Up to about 1970, the sources Google uses for this data had bale as more favoured; perhaps the influence of American English became more effective around that time. The comparatively huge increase in bale out in BrE sources during the Second World War would indicate that ...


3

Standard is not a synonym for team. If the form is asking what games the student has taken part in at their previous school, I would assume that it means "what sports teams have they been a member of, and to what standard (i.e. level) do they play?"


3

The phrase "healthy risk" is describing the risk itself as being "healthy". Obviously, if the risk were related to an individual's well-being, then the phrase "healthy risk" would be paradoxical and wouldn't make any sense, since a risk is defined as being "a situation involving exposure to danger" (according to the ...


3

No, they are not allophones or in complementary distribution. There are several words with /ɑːɹ/ followed by a vowel. The word "starrer" is pronounced /stɑːɹə/ in British English (Lexico), not */stæɹə/. I'd imagine "sparrer", "starring", "scarring", "charring", "tarring", etc. also have an /ɑːɹ/ ...


2

There's a good explanation of the difference here. In addition to the regional differences among English-speaking nations, it points out that 'specialty' is more commonly used as an adjective; 'speciality' as a noun. As a native speaker of British English, this is the distinction I make.


2

How early in the morning did you send the e-mail? Perhaps the person who replied would have started it straight away, and guessed that they would have finished it that morning if they had, but they can't start on it until the afternoon, because they have problems to deal with, and they must deal with those problems first.


1

If you are British, the comma goes outside of the quotations (in this case). If you are American, the comma goes inside of the quotations (in every case). In British English, commas are only written inside quotations if they were in the original quote. Also, you place a comma at the end of a quote if you are quoting a whole sentence (this doesn't apply to ...


1

@Elliot in the comments is correct for "normal" usage, the preposition in is used with "mood", or you can use the adjective moody. However, recent slang does use "mood" without a preposition. The most common way might be attached to a picture, illustrating said mood, as explained by Daily dot and Slate. This can also take the ...


1

Your question is ambiguous when you say "the answer indicates 'shows' in bold is not correct." This is ambiguous because you said (one line above) that the original text includes the word "shows." The drug company profits from the experiment it shows that its product is effective. This sentence is ungrammatical; it is made of two ...


1

I see the Annotated Mother Goose was published in 1962. In those (pre-decimal) days the yard was familiar to every British reader. 12 inches = 1 foot. 3 feet = 1 yard. An inch is about 2 1/2 centimetres, and a yard is a little under a metre. The point of a 'yard of ale' is the difficulty of drinking from such an awkwardly-shaped glass, not the exact volume.


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