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5

From the context, the translation of the French verb déterrer (to unearth) fits pretty well. As in 'he (and his identity) will soon be déterré (unearthed or uncovered). Presumably, the inference is that very talented people are rarely unknown or obscure, as their talents are already known in certain circles, even if not widely publicised. 'We shall ...


4

It rains a lot in London, and many of the buildings have eaves that can shelter people from the rain if they are underneath them. However, they're not terribly large eaves, so in order to gain shelter from the rain as you're walking along, you'd need to walk right up against the wall. As a result, if two people walking in opposite directions along a given ...


4

In British English it's normally spelt either "deodorant" or "air freshener" depending on whether you want to deodorise a person or a room. Apparently, according to Collins, "deodorizer" and "deodoriser" are both acceptable in British English, but I can't say I've ever heard of them in 30-something years of living in South East England.


3

This is a matter of style, so it's not possible to give a definitive answer on what the correct use is. Different style guides, and different people, will use dashes in different ways. Having said that, it's generally been the case that more British style guides will say to not use an em dash but, where US style would use an em dash, to use an en dash that'...


3

The Oxford English Dictionary has examples earlier than the 90s. Here's its earliest for "reality programming", from Public Opinion Quarterly (1962): When the broadcaster presents fantasy, children attend by the millions, while parents and educators complain; when he presents reality programming, the critics applaud but few children..watch. The OED ...


2

Dictionaries generally agree that drop out is the verb form and dropout or drop-out is the noun form. (See Merriam-Webster, which has dropout for the noun, and the Oxford English Dictionary, which has drop-out for the noun.) This fits a general pattern for nouns formed from phrasal verbs: as a noun they tend to form a word without a space or a hyphenated ...


2

It means, here, “except”. “Effected” means “made to happen” here. The “not . . . but” in combination mean “only.”


1

As Xanne's answer says it means "except". This is a valid meaning of "but", however it isn't used much these days: ordinary English has changed quite a lot since 1791. Gooling "but define" returns, among others, this entry from the Online Oxford Living Dictionary in which: meaning 2 is {with negative or in questions} Used to indicate the impossibility ...


1

As nick012000's answer indicates, to "give the wall to X" is to defer to X, to show respect to X, to yield to X, or to protect X. The implication is that the one to whom you are giving the wall is deserving of your respect or deference. The following is a historical trip through ancient digitized works with examples to illustrate the usage of this phrase. ...


1

"Whatever is a profession" seems to be used in the sense of "any activity that comprises a profession". "...and maintains numbers" seems to be used in the sense of "and (any profession) which is capable of establishing and reproducing an appreciable number of practising members". What the author is asserting is his view that any profession is within the ...


1

Such terminology is closely tied to the peculiarities of the legal system of a particular country, and there is therefore no straightforward way of translating a term like this into the language of a country with a different legal system. If one is speaking to an audience whose country happens to have something very similar in its legal system, one may use ...


1

Some local councils in the United Kingdom employ meighbourhood wardens. These are civilians, with no special powers of arrest. The Neighbourhood Warden Service deal with environmental problems to improve local areas. They promote community involvement and social inclusion, especially among young people. Regular patrols are carried out throughout the ...


1

As a British person, I have always known (and use) the expression That's the way the cookie crumbles. given by the Oxford Dictionaries as a North American phrase. However I never buy cookies — even when that word is on the packet — but biscuits. One British term for a cookie jar is biscuit barrel NOUN British A small barrel-shaped ...


1

I think sentence #4 does treat horses as the class of all horses, and that's exactly the problem with it. It is possible for a class of objects to be a tool, if those objects collectively form a resource that is useful for accomplishing some task. But it is not possible for a class of objects to be an animal, which is by definition a single living being. ...


1

This answer contains opinion. A concise solution, I believe, would be "spark up" as in "Spark Up Big Data In Economics". One, this directly prompts (commands) your audience to get active, i.e. to use your tool, which the more impersonal "Lighting/Setting the spark" doesn't do. And two, this dominant effect contrasts somewhat amusingly against the ...


1

Hello SAFEX welcome to EL&U. I looked for examples of "light a spark" online and found a few, although I couldn't find a definition of it as an idiom. Similarly I tried "Set a spark" which seemed more natural to me as a spark is a transitory thing which is used to light something else. This returned a similar number. I then ran a Google Ngram to find ...


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