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I would suggest marginalize -- or workplace marginalization. verb (used with object), mar·gin·al·ized, mar·gin·al·iz·ing. to place in a position of marginal importance, influence, or power: the government's attempts to marginalize criticism and restore public confidence. If you google, you'll find a lot of articles on the subject. Here is an ...


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"embedding theoretical knowledge into practice" may appear grandiose. Another way to phrase this could be ; "put my knowledge into action". Or; "Set what was learned to work". Best of luck 😊


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To your first question, the original context would have been legal, and I can find attestation for the exact phrase and similar phrases in the 1960s. A collocation search in the Corpus of Historical American English doesn't turn up "underage woman," but it does turn up several terms related to age-related laws, whether alcohol consumption (drinking, drinkers)...


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a guestbook OED A book detailing the visitors or guests at a particular place or event; esp. a book in which a visitors to a domestic residence, a tourist attraction, etc., can leave their names, addresses, and comments. As in: 2003 N.Y. Times He inscribed the words ‘never forget’ in a guest book, and alighted his motorcade to return to ...


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sidelined to force someone or something into a situation in which they have less influence or importance than before: After I got pregnant, I felt that my bosses were sidelining me. The oil industry would be very unhappy if this legislation was sidelined to stop someone taking an active and important part in something: He was sidelined after criticizing ...


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..."believe you me" is often used by some older folks in Kent, to my mind , it's an awfully old fashioned way to speak, mind you , Father always uses it but , to put things in perspective , he had a tough start due to the war, not to put too fine a point on it, Dad grew up a yokel 😄.


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It is the correct usage. proverbial adjective used in a proverb or other phrase: The players pointed the proverbial finger at themselves as the ones needing to improve. Proverbial Examples: A place where you can let your proverbial hair down and party like an animal, the Ice House has something for everyone So this is when you let ...


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I occurs frequently, as in Into Thin Air google books He nodded. “That's great! That means Amanda is alive.” Or at least she was at some recent point.


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"A recent point" can be interpreted as "a recent point in time". If this phrase were to be written using a single word, the word would be "recently". So you can imagine what it literally means. Therefore, the answer is yes. It does occur in English. By using "recently", you are actually referring to a recent point in time, and vice versa.


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generational adjective relating to or characteristic of all the people born and living at about the same time, regarded collectively. relating to the different generations of a particular family.


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I'd suggest insider. Your parents had insider knowledge. In your sample sentence you could use quotation marks to indicate an analogy to the 'insider joke' (or 'inside joke'). From Dictionary Insider noun a person who is a member of a group, organization, society, etc. a person belonging to a limited circle of persons who understand the actual facts ...


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The yolk is, ostensibly, the ‘good bit’ of the egg, located in the ‘mediocre bit’ ie the white. Here, the white is likened to the sailor, and the yolk is likened to ‘what he has inside him’ - ie the wit, courage, bravery etc - needed to navigate the challenging Cape Horn. It means he’ll need to call on all his inner resources - his ‘yolk’ to succeed. It’s ...


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