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"are white people colorless? Isn't white a color too?" There is an interesting question at Is there a word for "bright colored eyes"? that is related. The answer to that question is that the Farsi expression assumes that everyone has brown eyes. Coloured" is used because the people who called other people "coloured" were ...


18

Some say that "colored" is neutral or in some cases even respectful, but it is hard to avoid the conclusion that the term is a racist distinction (cf. Jim Crow) and only ever meant "non-white." According to Wikipedia: Colored, or coloured, is an ethnic descriptor historically used in the United States (predominantly during the Jim Crow ...


11

Terms like this are inherently problematic. If I describe my friend as "this kid with glasses and a lightning-shaped scar over his right eye," it's pretty clear that I'm describing objective identifying characteristics that are value-neutral, probably so you'll recognize him the next time you see him at Hogwarts. Not so with words that describe ...


9

"are white people colorless? Isn't white a color too?" In scientific terms, white is not a single colour (i.e. a single wavelength of light). It is a combination of all visible colours. Some people describe white as a colour others don't. Of course "white" people aren't white at all. Their complexion varies according to health and ...


8

Appropriately, this site grew out of a site for computer programmers (of which I am not one, not even close). It is a reference to rubber duck debugging In software engineering, rubber duck debugging is a method of debugging code. The name is a reference to a story in the book The Pragmatic Programmer in which a programmer would carry around a rubber duck ...


2

self-confidence lack of self-confidence self-confident not self-confident unsure unconfident in the Merriam Webster, yes, it's there. No one uses it. Will you find it in some books on psychology etc. Yes, you might. Is it used in everyday speech like confident? No, it isn't.


2

Not enough rep to comment, but as a programmer I can confirm Damila's answer is correct, at least in context of the exchange outlined in the question. In programming and QA, it's helpful to say your problem (or even just your thoughts) out loud, and often this means having some object to "tell your problem to". A rubber duck is the somewhat ...


1

Probably in the way conveys the meaning you are referring to: If you say that someone gets in the way or is in the way, you are annoyed because their presence or their actions stop you doing something properly. 'We wouldn't get in the way,' Suzanne promised. 'We'd just stand quietly in a corner.' (Collins)


1

The sayings you are referring to appear to derive from the neurological sense of nerves: From the neurological sense come Nerves "condition of hysterical nervousness," attested by 1890, perhaps from 1792. to get on (someone's) nerves is from 1895. War of nerves "psychological warfare" is from 1915. The ÔÇťaudacity sense is attested from ...


1

The OED gives buggerlugs and bug-a-lugs at the same entry. Bugger started off as "Bogomil" - a member of a 13th century Bulgarian sect. The sect was heretical and, in order to villianise them, the Catholic Church's propaganda against them accused them of homosexual practices. Bugger then took the meaning of an active homosexual. In this meaning it ...


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