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There is, in current English a clear distinction between smoke and steam OED Steam: 6. a. The vapour into which water is converted when heated. In popular language, applied to the visible vapour which floats in the air in the form of a white cloud or mist, and which consists of minute globules or vesicles of liquid water suspended in a mixture of ...


2

I'm not sure that "sentence" does have a negative connotation - although the convict might not agree. The first entries in the OED for "Sentence(n.)" are †1. Way of thinking, opinion. Obsolete. 1340 Ayenbite (1866) 69 Þer byeþ zome..þet none guode techinge ne onderuongeþ ak alneway weryeþ hare sentense huet þet hit by. 1609 Bible (Douay) ...


2

When you take the phrase "be bleat" on its own, it is meaningless in English. As you noted, "bleat" means a cry of pain or displeasure, typically made by a sheep, and of course no one can literally be that cry of pain. But as with many song lyrics, that doesn't mean it's actually meaningless. Essentially it's a shortening (or "contraction") of "he can't be ...


2

The definitive English usage of forbear is surely the epitaph on Shakespeare’s grave: William Shakespeare's grave, Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-on-Avon, England.ᴀᴛᴛʀɪʙᴜᴛɪᴏɴ: Clipping of image by David Jones from Wikipedia Containing this quatrain in iambic tetrameter: Good frend for Iesvs sake forebeare, To digg the dvst encloased heare. Bleste be ...


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Referring someone is simply directing a person's attention to another person without mentioning any qualifications. Recommending someone is saying that the person has a good rating.


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"As per" is a preposition, meaning according to/in accordance with. 'As per checking' does not sound natural to me. I'd rather use "upon checking."


2

"Face lift" (which I have also seen as "face-lift" and "facelift") involves only cosmetic changes, not structural changes are made. There might be a perception that the face lift has been done to hide some flaws. In a house it is not unusual to find that vinyl siding is hiding rotting wood. There is nothing inherent in the term that says it is ...


1

Just can be a noun, and has been used that way since Middle English: The prophetis..that bifore teelden of the comynge of the iust. Wycliffe Bible, c1384 (See more modern translations of this passage.) This is similar to how we often talk about the rich and the poor. However, in your sentences it is just an adjective.


1

Worry is fear-based. It is a projection of negative energy. Care, on the other hand, is a projection of positive energy. In the word context "You don't have to care about your appearance.", the word "don't" is more likely to be a negative statement. Therefore, worry is more suitable. However, "You care about your appearance" is much consider to be a ...


1

In a comment, John Lawler wrote: Too is a negative. Too high means so high that Not S, where S is some expected result. Too doesn't take a that complement clause. But so does. The idiom is so Adj that S or such (a) NP that S. So and such mean the same but work with different kinds of words. So it's probly a mistake, with somebody typing too instead of so, ...


1

Far be it from me to criticize your work.( I certainly would not criticize your work.) We are dealing here about the present subjunctive form of the verb that is almost like bare infinitive ( root verb without " to" i.e. go, be, read, play etc.). Here we don't use third person singular "s" and don't require "do" support to form negative. It's use is ...


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Interestingly, and as you wish to be "archaic", the verb to forbear + from (intransitive and reflexive) is agood choice: Yes, there is no reason why you should not use "forbear" in the imperative. OED: a. transitive. To refrain from using, uttering, mentioning, etc.; to withhold, keep back. †Formerly const. from, to, or dative. b. reflexive. ...


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