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15

In general, it is good practice that the symbol that a number is associated with agrees with the way the number is written (in numeric or text form). For example, $3 instead of 3 dollars. Note that this doesn't apply when the numbers are large, so it is perfectly fine to write 89.5 percent, as eighty-nine-and-a-half percent is very clunky. This source ...


9

If you're writing out the number then write out 'percent', e.g. ten percent, otherwise use the sign, e.g. 10%.


8

Well, if you're just looking for usage examples, it's easy enough to do a Google search for the phrase "which decision proved," which method will give you quite a few examples. (They will include many quotations of a passage from Little Women involving a "second tumble down the beanstalk.") Of course, you can also substitute different nouns and verbs for "...


5

I think it helps to look at the etymology of born. Old English boren, alternative past participle of beran (see bear (v.)). "In modern use the connexion with bear is no longer felt; the phrase to be born has become virtually an intr. verb" [OED]. So it's origin is as a past participle, such as used in the passive voice, and that is strictly speaking ...


4

You will probably find many results if you search for relative adjective, which term you will find in Merriam–Webster and elsewhere: Relative adjective: a pronominal adjective that introduces a clause qualifying an antecedent (as which in: “our next meeting will be on Monday, at which time a new chairman will be elected” ) or a ...


3

Born can either be thought of as an adjective or as a verb that can only be used passively, or it's the past participle of the verb bear as in: transitive verb 1a : to accept or allow oneself to be subjected to especially without giving way //couldn't bear the pain// I can't bear seeing you cry ... 2a : to move while holding up and ...


2

1) Two and two is four. = 2 and 2 is four. [spoken more than written] The written form is: 2 plus 2 is 4. [arithmetic numbers, formal register] 2) Two and two make four. [informal speech, arithmetic] "But Little Johnny, two and two make four, not five." 3) Two twos make four. [informal speech, not arithmetic, cards, for example] Correction: Two twos make ...


1

I think it should be singular in this case, as in cell populations. As a native speaker, I'd avoid an "s" here unless it was possessive (and therefore also had an associated apostrophe). I don't think your usage is possessive. For proof, see this ngrams graph showing that "cell populations" is much more common than "cell populations". For explanation, it's ...


1

Let us "Let's" is a contraction of "Let us". Expand that, and the sentence is pretty straightforward. Don't let us get you cheap The meaning here is the literal meaning, but to understand it, you have to see the line in context. The character who says this, Barbara, is trying to get the other character, Bill, to mend his ways and join the Salvation Army. ...


1

Oxford's online English-Spanish dictionary has the exact same example you mention: which cuál, pron. Pronunciación /(h)wɪtʃ/ /wɪtʃ/ ADJETIVO 2 2.1 (as relative) we arrived at two, by which time they had gone — llegamos a las dos y para entonces ya se habían ido Más frases de ejemplo in which case — en cuyo caso he refused, ...


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