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2

I suggest arbitrarily. The word is often used in science when discussing a non-specific quantity that may be of any chosen or otherwise determined (perhaps random, or merely exemplary) value. There is a useful discussion at https://math.stackexchange.com/questions/775333/arbitrarys-meaning


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There is a probable duplicate, but I've never seen this (doubtless nonce) compound secondary-modifier (adjective modifier, traditionally adverb) before. Fibonacci∞spiral∞attractive. Where if anywhere does one hyphenate? Looking for similar strings that are idiomatic, we find drop-dead gorgeous and arguably lead-pipe cinch but stone cold sober as well as ...


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You already know what "up" means. Why do you know and how do you know "up" is "up" ? It's because "up" has been used as that and you learned "up" as that. Water is water. Boy is a boy and girl is a girl. For many years, "up" has been used in so many ways having so many applications, keeping its ...


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Ergo is an option too but I like consequently.


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You could just use hence which implies a logical connection or deduction. See Merriam Webster because of a preceding fact or premise : THEREFORE. The definition of Dictionary.com says as an inference from this fact; for this reason; therefore: e.g. The eggs were very fresh and hence satisfactory. Synonyms like subsequently would perfectly work as well. (...


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The quoted text uses otherwise as an adjective to qualify tale. It might also be argued that otherwise is used as an adverb to qualify the implied elliptical verb in “… tale {that is} otherwise so…}”. Let us consider both possibilities: Otherwise adjective = used to show that something is completely different from what you think it is or from what was ...


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No, it would not be rewritten as “already.” Think of it as “even without which it would be considered . . .” It is not a different use of the word from that in use today. Mary Shelley is an adroit user of language, and her text does not seem out-of-date today. You yourself report searching the 19th century books in Google Ngram and not finding any use of “...


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We need air to be able to breathe and continue to our lives. On that account, we need to make an effort to reduce the air pollution. Instead of "on that account", you could also use: For this reason/As a result/Consequently,... You can find many other synonyms on WordHippo.


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Here are some to pick from: accordingly, basically, clearly, consequently, effectively, indeed, inevitably, necessarily, particularly, specifically, subsequently, ultimately.


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There's a name for repetition that adds nothing: tautology. Oxford Lexico example for tautology: It is conceivable that the key to truth lies in tautology and redundancy. Hopefulness and probability are too close in meaning, like Big Fat Greek Wedding, where the tautology is funny. Other times, you need tautology for emphasis, like "Cash only. No ...


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It looks like you wonder if you can use two adverbs naturally at the same in a sentence. You should keep in mind that "adverb" is just an additional information in a sentence(not the core). Hopefully, they will probably help us out in the future. (I can't find what's wrong) Hopefully and probably, they will help us out in the future.(Alternative) ...


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