5

I agree with Cascabel and GEdgar: this usage of post seems very unlikely, at least for native speakers. The Oxford English Dictionary records six different verbs post. They are all listed as regular verbs, however, with no special notes. I also looked at the Merriam-Webster, Lexico, American Heritage Dictionary, Collins, Macmillan, Cambridge, and Wiktionary. ...


3

Old English ind, und were lengthened to [aɪnd], [aʊnd] The spelling “ou” is used in present-day English found, bound, wound to represent the diphthong vowel sound [aʊ]. Before the consonant cluster "nd", [aʊ] developed from Old English [u] (through a lengthened stage [uː]). But [aʊ] did not develop before “ng” or “nn” (the "n" in spun is ...


2

The first one would be correct. "An unexpected condition caused an error". You could use the other form however that one would be to say that it will or it is causing the error. It might be worded like this but probably wouldn't fit. "An unexpected condition is the cause of the error". To me, the first one sounds better.


2

The standard past tense form of post is posted. There are some verbs ending in [st] where standard English uses a past tense form ending in [st] (it is possible to analyze this as a simplification of [stt], with [t] as an irregular past tense marker instead of the syllabic [əd] that regularly appears with verbs ending in [t] or [d]). For example, cast. ...


1

On a computer the error normally occurs first and the the error message comes later, so "An unexpected condition caused an error". If the error is ongoing the message might be "An unexpected condition is causing an error". This would be less common because the response to an unforeseen error is more likely to be a system halt.


1

The past and past participle of "post": posted "I post flyers every day" <-- this "post" is present tense and "every day" implies "habitual actions that are repeated often in your life" so it means a kind of a habit -- posting flyers -- which you had done in the past, are doing now, and will probably be ...


1

I agree with @Cascabel , "post" is not correctly used as a past tense. There is the possibility that "post" is used as a subjunctive; and that may refer to something in the past. "The judge ordered that the mayor post the notice in the town square".


1

Of the nine standard modal verbs in English, only eight of these are inflected for tense as four pairs: Present Tense Past Tense will would shall should can could may might And these naturally pair like this: Present Tense Past Tense Today, I think I will go. Yesterday, I thought I would go. I think I can get to it today. I thought I could get to it ...


1

had to I must go. (present) I had to go. (past)


1

[Learniv] This verb has both an irregular and regular form. You can use both and both are correct. Speakers in North America and Canada use learned while the rest of the English-speaking world seems to prefer learnt. Learned (but not learnt) is also an adjective. When said of a person, it means ‘ having a lot of knowledge because you have studied and read a ...


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