11

When a mathematician says that There exists a B they know nothing else about B except that B must exist (in the appropriate mathematical sense of exist, which I won't go into here). Existence and non-existence can be proved without definiteness. The appropriate article for something that has just entered the discourse without any information except its ...


11

Using a is not a mistake but the beginning of the full description. It is common to speak of the object with a and then go into the description which identifies it as unique. Then it is described as the or this mapping to include the details of the description. If you were to use the to describe it from very the beginning it would be assumed that the ...


5

The rule about using the definite article for a specific noun (whether singular or plural) is not that it has been mentioned before. The rule is: The definite article (the) is used before a noun to indicate that the identity of the noun is known to the reader. [Butte College Education; emphasis mine] Very often the identity of the noun is known to the ...


1

Note the capitalisation of God/god. I'm neither a man nor a god- man is a countable common noun; god is a countable common noun. I'm neither man nor God - man is an uncountable common noun designating a class of object; God is an uncountable proper noun, i.e. a name. I'm neither a man nor God - man is a countable common noun; God is an uncountable proper ...


1

I'm upgrading a comment to an answer as suggested by the OP. I apologise for the lack of supporting evidence which, with the reference to KateBuntin's comment, was the reson for my not posting it as an answer initially. They could have said "Ronald Hutton is a professor of history (at the University of Bristol). That would say that he was one among the ...


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