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Even though many widely accepted "rules" of grammar have exceptions, your strategy has far too many flaws for me to say it is even a good rule of thumb. Your strategy suggests that if there is no reason to put the indefinite article before a noun then you should not use the definite article either. The first problem is that any specific noun may require an ...


2

In your examples, I would use "the". But in other cases I might use no or the indefinite article, for example, It was a smoggy day. Pollution made the air at ground level almost unbreathable. It's an understatement to say that Labron James plays basketball at a high level. It depends on whether the adjective you're using is chosen from an implied ...


2

Practical implications really means 'what will (or more accurately is likely to) happen if a certain event happens or perhaps more usually if a certain policy is implemented'. But [the findings of] a research study usually [don't /] doesn't trigger events, especially if kept secret, so here, a broadening from the usual sense to 'what the research ...


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It's all fine. Here is something which might help you understand the problem. Michael Swan, Practical English Usage, 3rd ed. point 179(3) 'In informal English we often leave out unstressed words at the beginning of a sentence if the meaning is clear. The words include articles, possessives, personal pronouns, auxiliary verbs and the preparatory subject ...


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The example from the grammar book is correct and breaks no rules of the English language. 'Truth' can be: An abstract noun equal in meaning to 'veracity', 'honesty' What we live by in our community is truth and justice. A regular noun equal to 'fact' You need to learn these scientific truths. A noun equal in meaning to 'reality', 'what happened' I ...


2

The difference between the two sentences really comes down to context. If there have been no preceding sentences, and there are no following sentences, then the meaning is essentially the same. But if there is other information conveyed by another sentence, then there can be a significant difference between the use of the definite article and the ...


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No, the article can't be omitted. "I decided to run $1000 giveaway" is grammatically incorrect for the same reason "I decided to run giveaway" is.


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1 The man turned traitor ([dative noun or] adjectival as complement) after he was arrested. Compare "The man turned traitorous ( adjectival as complement) after he was arrested. OED Traitor 3. attributive [noun] or as adj. That is a traitor, traitorous. 1837 A. Tennent Vis. Glencoe 18 Some traitor spy, Meant to betray thee with a lie. OED: ...


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"All the other variables" implies that they are known and being referred to by using the word "the". "All other variables" implies all variables, known, unknown, or that may someday be known. It sounds more like it's covering everything in existence. If I had five automobiles and said, "Two are cars and all other automobiles are trucks," it would sound ...


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Standard usage and common practice show that this is correct, despite what you may have been taught from a grammarian standpoint. Most English native speakers don't know the grammar of their own language, as it is not usually taught in schools so thoroughly as in other countries. "The truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth"is a standard phrase for ...


1

No, there's no article missing here. Rather than referring to some specific exhibition of a particular film, the author is using the word "exhibition" to refer in a general way to the practice or business of exhibiting motion pictures in movie theaters. "The Laemmle name is now associated with exhibition" means that the name is associated with exhibition ...


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You say : I was told that for 1 B is correct and for 2 A is correct. So sometimes an article is required and sometimes not. You were having difficulty understanding why there was an article used in ...is called a computer programme, but not in ...is called code. The answer is simply that "computer programme" is a countable noun, while "code", used in this ...


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