Hot answers tagged

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For favour(n.) OED gives 7.a. (concrete of 1.) Something given as a mark of favour; esp. a gift such as a knot of ribbons, a glove, etc., given to a lover, or in mediæval chivalry by a lady to her knight, to be worn conspicuously as a token of affection. 1592 Greenes Groats-worth of Witte sig. C3v She..returnd him a silke Riband for a fauour tyde ...


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"Aegis" I believe is the proper word. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/aegis


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"Connivance", which has more pejorative overtones than some other options, is probably your best bet. OED connivance, n.1. a. The action of conniving; the action of winking at, overlooking or ignoring (an offence, fault, etc.); often implying secret sympathy or approval: tacit permission or sanction; encouragement by forbearing to condemn. 1861 "G....


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When riding a horse, keeping tight reins is to firmly hold the reins (straps used to steer the horse), keeping the horse under control and in most cases slowing the horse down. Loosening the reins gives the horse more freedom to move at their own pace, as Hot Licks put it . .more naturally, and perhaps speeding up. Although tightening the reins is similar ...


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The character is probably confusing "on the nose" with "by a nose", which means to win by a slim margin. But no one bets on that, they just bet on the position that the horse comes in (first, second, third). "on the nose" normally means "precisely" or "exactly", so I suspect she's using this to mean that the horse should be specifically the winner, not one ...


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The phrase 'ya, boss' is used as an informal method to acknowledge or respond. It might not be an insult. Some other phrases are 'Done boss' or 'supp boss'. It's a common use of the phrase by the superior to their subordinates and sometimes even vice versa. But the situation and the expression showed also play a vital role in understanding the true nature of ...


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