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63 votes
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What is the term for a sentence which reads same forwards and backwards?

They are still called palindromes, but are qualified by the term word-unit. There are also word-unit palindromes in which the unit of reversal is the word ("Is it crazy how saying sentences ...
Lawrence's user avatar
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63 votes

Is there a sentence that begins with “them”?

Them? This is a complete sentence.
George White's user avatar
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62 votes
Accepted

Is there a sentence that begins with “them”?

Fronting the object for focus, by converting an SVO sentence into an OSV one, is a common enough syntactic pattern in English: Contest Rules Submitting ungrammatical sentences is of no use here.Them ...
tchrist's user avatar
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56 votes

Is there a sentence that begins with “them”?

At the risk of stating the obvious: 'Them' is the word that starts this sentence. If that's a little too meta: 'Them' is my favourite movie.
DJClayworth's user avatar
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45 votes

How is “The Stars My Destination” a grammatically correct title/sentence?

It makes complete sense. You're under-citing. Here's the entire verse from The Stars My Destination: Gully Foyle is my name And Terra is my nation. Deep space is my dwelling place, The stars my ...
tchrist's user avatar
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43 votes

Is there a sentence that begins with “them”?

This form (using a gerund, or noun phrase) hasn't been mentioned yet, and is grammatical albeit awkward: Them being able to come up with such unusual sentences was a surprise to some but not to ...
Noldorin's user avatar
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25 votes

Is there a sentence that begins with “them”?

Them was Van Morrison's band in the 60's. Them Again was the name of their second album. Them In Reality was the name of their 1971 album. At least four sentences on the linked wikipedia page ...
mcalex's user avatar
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19 votes

Is there a sentence that begins with “them”?

Have you never seen a Western? Typical dialogue: “Them there critters are mighty jumpy tonight” And here is a real example from The Legend of Barry Claw “Them there Injuns sure won’t never ...
David's user avatar
  • 12.9k
13 votes

Is there a sentence that begins with “them”?

Them and meth are anagrams. This is a sample sentence.
Prasanth Ganesan's user avatar
11 votes

What is the term for a sentence which reads same forwards and backwards?

Chiasmus, would be my response. Taken from literarydevices.net: Chiasmus is a rhetorical device in which two or more clauses are balanced against each other by the reversal of their structures ...
Inoutguttiwutts's user avatar
9 votes

Is there a sentence that begins with “them”?

‘Them bones, them bones, them dry bones’ are lyrics from a spiritual, where they originally appear as 'dem', that also appear as 'them', in a song by Alice in Chains. http://www.metrolyrics.com/them-...
Jelila's user avatar
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9 votes
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Is this just an error or am I missing something?

I suspect the intended meaning is, "As the farmers, we provide all our teas with a Tea Passport..." The producers are saying that they have farmed the tea themselves, rather than bought it ...
The Photon's user avatar
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8 votes
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an "X is an X is an X" what does this mean?

It usually means an X is an X and will never be anything other than an X - reinforcing the idea with repetition. If you look only at the number of words and think all repetitions are tautological (...
anongoodnurse's user avatar
8 votes
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Trivia quesiton logic

"Ago" means "earlier than the present time" or "before now". It is not used to talk about time before future events. Jane is twelve years old. For the answer to be eight, the riddle would be "In two ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
8 votes

Is there a sentence that begins with “them”?

My grandmother, who lived through the depression as a sixth child in a hardscrabble mining family, had a saying - "Them that has, gets."
Jeremy Brown's user avatar
6 votes
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Using synonyms to improve text readability ("elegant variation")

This is a matter of style, on which people disagree. In the past, people in English-speaking countries, just like the OP, have been taught that such ‘elegant variation’ is desirable, that it makes ...
jsw29's user avatar
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6 votes
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Will definitely be Vs will be definitely

There are certain adverbs in English that are typically placed in mid position (as opposed to front or end position). Among these mid-position adverbs are 'certainty' adverbs such as definitely, ...
Shoe's user avatar
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6 votes
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What are the differences between the following?

The sentences mean slightly different things. I did this for the first time in Tibet. This implies that this is the first time you've done it ever. I did this in Tibet for the first time. This ...
FeliniusRex - gone's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

What's the syntactic explanation in "Mistakes are likely to happen":

As pointed out in comments, (be) likely is a Raising predicate. That means that the noun phrase subject of be likely with a following infinitive complement is not really the subject of likely, but of ...
John Lawler's user avatar
6 votes

Skipping a relative pronoun

You are in error. If you had only skipped the relative pronoun, you would have produced the ungrammatical clause *I slowly turn toward the elderly gentleman is standing at my side In fact, in ...
John Lawler's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

What do you call a sentence that reverses parts of the first clause in a second clause that makes sense, too?

I found the answer. The phrase is actually called an antimetabole, defined by Wikipedia as: the repetition of words in successive clauses, but in transposed order (e.g., "I know what I like, and I ...
Tyler's user avatar
  • 347
5 votes

Through a Glass, Clearly / A Scanner Darkly / In a Mirror, Darkly / etc

The phrase through a glass darkly originated in the 1560 Geneva Bible translation of The First Epistle of Paul to the Corinthians, Chapter 13, verse 12. But, the phrase's popularity correlates with ...
Arm the good guys in America's user avatar
5 votes

Is this just an error or am I missing something?

I think this may be a case of a misplaced modifier. Consider the part As the farmers, all our teas... It seems to suggest that teas are the farmers. Equivalently, if you use the participle phrase ...
user405662's user avatar
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5 votes
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"There are fish of every hue." For different kinds of fish, should fish be in plural form here?

The plural form of "fish" is "fish" ("fishes" is also an accepted plural, but it is less common). The same is true for bison sheep deer moose aircraft and a number of ...
garnerstan's user avatar
4 votes

Is there a word in English for this particular type of humourous use of a word twice

As far as I know, there is no word for this specific example of using a word twice in a humorous way. I can, however, point you to similar sentences which exhibit the same kind of humor, and explain ...
DyingIsFun's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

What's wrong with the sentence "I got so many requests to make some Valentine's Day treats.", if anything?

What you miss here is a final clause, of the sort that expresses not so much purpose as result. Such final clauses are commonly introduced by that, though the that is often optional. The following, ...
Brian Donovan's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Is there a term for filler sounds in written language

Those are known as interjections. Merriam-Webster says of this part of speech: An interjection is a word or phrase that is grammatically independent from the words around it, and mainly expresses ...
1006a's user avatar
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4 votes
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Mixing countability; how to correctly say "there is plenty of rice, earthquakes and typhoons"?

The OP asks: “But here I am asking if there is a way that I can keep the three nouns as close together as possible” One sentence. Earthquakes and typhoons are as plentiful as rice where I live.
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
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4 votes
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What does it mean when you say 'What I wouldn't give to be there?

It's a less dramatic version of the doubtless hyperbolic "I'd give my right arm [/hand] to be there." (See, for example, Cambridge Dictionary) The implication is that you'd give up many of your ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar

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